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1 I B RARY 

OF THE 
UN IVLR.SITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

C 
D56H 
19IO/II- 
1917/19 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/catalogueregist1019dick 



VI 



FEBRUARY, 1911 



No* 1 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

THJE CATALOG 
1910-1911 




Carlisle, Pa. 



PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 



February— May— July— November 

J a^'' * CCOad ?* sa matter January 19, 1906, at the postoffice at Carllsh 
under Act ot Congress of July 16, 1894.] ^«*"»»« 




CATALOG 



OF 



Dickinson College 



1910=1911 



128th Annual Session 




CARLISLE, PA. 
Published by the College 
mdccccxi 



U 



1910 





JULY 






s... 


3 


10 


17 


24 31 


M... 


4 


11 


18 


25 




T... 


5 


12 


19 


26 




W.. 


6 


13 


20 


27 




T... 


7 


14 


21 


28 




F 1 


8 


15 


22 


29 




S 2 


9 


16 


23 


30 





AUGUST 



s... 




7 


14 


21 


28 


M... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


T... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


W.. 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


T... 


4 


11 


18 


25 




F 


5 


12 


19 


26 


... 


S 


6 


13 


20 


27 





SEPTEMBER 



s... 




4 


11 


18 


25 


M... 




5 


12 


19 


26 


T... 




6 


13 


20 


27 


W.. 




7 


14 


21 


28 


T... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


F... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


S... 


3 


10 


17 


24 





OCTOBER 



s .. 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


M.. 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


T .. 


4 


11 


18 


25 




W.. 


5 


12 


19 


26 




T... 


6 


13 


20 


27 




F... 


7 


14 


21 


28 




S 1 


8 


15 


22 


29 





1911 



NOVEMBER 



s .. 
M... 
T... 
W.. 
T... 
F... 
S ... 



613120 

7 14 21 

8; 15 22 

9 16 23 

10 17 24 

111825 

1219J26 



DECEMBER 



s... 

M... 
T... 
W.. 
T... 

F... 2 

s 3 



411 
512 
.. 13 
7 14 
BIS 
9 16 
10 17 



25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
23|30 
24 31 



JANUARY 



s.... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


M.... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


T... 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


W .. 


4 


11 


18 


25 




T.... 


5 


12 


19 


26 




F.... 


6 


13 


20 


27 




S.... 


7 


14 


21 


28 





FEBRUARY 



s... 




5 


12 


19 


26 


M... 




6 


13 


20 


27 


T... 




7 


14 


21 


28 


W.. 


1 


8 


15 


22 




T... 


2 


9 


16 


23 




F... 


3 


10 


17 


24 




S... 


4 


11 


18 


25 







HARCH 






S... 




5 


12 


19 


26 


M... 




6 


13 


20 


27 


T... 




7 


14 


21 


28 


W.. 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


T... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


F... 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


S... 


4 


11 


18 


25 







APRIL 






S... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


M... 


3 


10 


17 


24 




T... 


4 


11 


18 


25 




W.. 


5 


12 


19 


20 




T .. 


6 


13 


20 


27 




F... 


7 


14 


21 


28 




S 1 


8 


15 


22 


29 







MAY 






S... 




7 


14 


21 


28 


M... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


2" 


T... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


W.. 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


T... 


4 


11 


18 


25 




F... 


5 


12 


19 


26 




S... 


6 


13 


20 


27 





JUNE 



S ... 
M... 
T... 
W.. 
T... 
F... 
S ... 



411 

5 12 

6 13 

7 14 
815 
9 16 



JULY 



s... 

M... 
T... 
W... 
T... 
F... 
S 1 



AUGUST 



s... 

M... 
T... 
W... 
T.... 
F.... 
S... 



SEPTEMBER 



s... 




3 


10 


17 


24 


M.. 




4 


11 


18 


25 


T... 




5 


12 


19 


26 


W... 




6 


13 


20 


27 


T .. 




7 


14 


21 


28 


F... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


S... 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 



OCTOBER 



s... 

M.... 
T... 

W... 
T... 
F... 
S... 



NOVEMBER 



S.... 
M.... 
T.... 
W... 
T.... 
F.... 
S.... 



19(26 

20127 
21 ! 28 



15 22 29 



30 



DECEMBER 



18 25 
20 26 

20 27 

21 28 

22 20 

23 30 



S ... 
M.... 
T .... 
W... 
T... 
F l 



3 10 17 24 ...IS : 9 162330 ... 



31 



1912 
JANUARY 



S... 
M... 
T... 
W... 
T... 
F... 
S... 



2128 
22 29 



20 27 



FEBRUARY 



s... 




4 


11 


18 


25 


M... 




6 


12 


19 


26 


T... 




6 


13 


20 


27 


W... 




7 


14 


21 


28 


T... 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


F... 


2 


9 


16 


23 




S... 


3 


10 


17 


24 





MARCH 



s... 

M... 
T... 
W... 
T... 
F 1 
S 2 



2431 
25... 
26... 

27... 
28... 
29... 
30... 



APRIL 



s... 

M .. 
T... 
W.. 

T... 
F... 

S... 



7 14 21 

815 22 

91623 

101724 



11 18 
1219 
13 20 



HAY 



S 5121926 

M 15 20 2; 

T 7 14 21 28 

W.. 1 8 15 22 20 
T... 2 9162330 
F... 3 10 17 24 31 



S... 



4 11 18 25 ... 



JUNE 



S ... 
M... 
T... 
W.. 

T... 

r ... 
s 1 



16 25 

17 24 

18 25 

19 26 



30 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



COLLEGE CALENDAR— 1910-1911. 



TALL TERM— 1910. 



Sept. 14, Wednesday. 

Sept. 15, Thursday. 

Sept. 16, Friday. 

Nov. 13-18. 

Nov. 24, Thursday. 

Dec. 21, Wednesday, 12.30 p. m. 



Entrance Examination. 
Fall Term begins. 
Y. M. C. A. Reception 
Week of Prayer. 
Thanksgiving- Day. 
Fall Term ends. 



WINTER TERM-I9II. 



Jan. 4, Wednesday, 8.15 a. m. 
Jan. 20, Friday. 
Jan. 26, Thursday. 
Feb. 3, Friday. 

Feb. 22, Wednesday. 
Feb. 24, Friday. 

Mar. 4, Saturday. 
Mar. 7, Tuesday. 

Mar. 17, Friday, 12.30 p. m. 



Winter Term begins. 
Inter-society Debate, Johnson Prize. 
Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Anniversary of the Belles Lettres 

Eiterary Society. 
Washington's Birthday Celebration. 
Anniversary of the Union Philo- 
sophical Society. 
Mid-winter Sports. 
Freshman Contest for Miller and 

Walkley Prizes. 
Winter Term ends. 



SPRUNG TERM— 1911. 



Mar. 28, Tuesday, 8.15 a. m, 
April 7, Friday. 

April 14, Friday. 

April 29, Saturday. 
May 15-19. 
May 29-June 3. 

June 3, Saturday, p. tn. 



Spring Term begins. 

Belles Eettres (Sophomore) Oratori- 
cal Prize Contest. 

Union Philosophical (Sophomore) 
Oratorical Prize Contest. 

Inter-scholastic Track Meet. 

Senior Final Examinations. 

Final Examinations of I the Junior, 

Sophomore, and Freshman Classes. 
Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 
Prizes. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



June 4, Sunday, 10.30 a. m. 

June 4, Sunday, 6.30 p. m. 
June 4, Sunday, 7.30 p. m. 



June 


5, 


Monday, 9.30 a. m. 


June 


5, 


Monday, 4 p. m. 


June 


5, 


Monday, 7 p. m. 


June 


5, 


Monday, 8 p. m. 


June 


5, 


Monday, 10 p. m. 


June 


6, 


Tuesday. 


June 


6, 


Tuesday, 7.30 p. m. 


June 


7, 


Wednesday, 8 a. m. 


June 


7, 


Wednesday, 9.30 a. m 


June 


7, 


Wednesday, 12 m. 



Baccalaureate Discourse by the 
President of the College. 

Campus Praise Service. 

Sermon before the College under the 
auspices of the Christian Asso- 
ciations. 

Class Day Exercises of the Class of 
1911. 

Annual Meeting- of the Incorpora- 
tors of the School of Law. 

Annual Meeting- of the Trustees of 
the College. 

Concert by the Musical Organiza- 
tions of the College. 

Junior Promenade — Campus. 

Alumni Day. Program to be An- 
nounced. 

Reception at the President's House. 

Final Chapel Service and Announce- 
ment of Class Advancements. 

Graduating Exercises of the College 
and Law Classes of 1911. 

Commencement Dinner. 



PALL TERM— 1911. 



Sept. 13, Wednesday. 
Sept. 14, Thursday. 
Dec. 20, Wednesday. 



Examinations for Admission. 
Fall Term begins. 
Fall Term ends. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 




HE COLLEGE CHARTER. 

AN ACT for the establishment of 
a college at the borough of Car- 
lisle, in the county of Cumber- 
land, in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Section I. Whereas, the hap- 
piness and prosperity of every 
community, (under the direction 
and government of Divine Provi- 
dence,) depends much on the right 
education of the youth, who must 
succeed the aged in the important 
offices of society, and the most ex- 
alted nations have acquired their pre-eminence, by the virtuous prin- 
ciple and liberal knowledge instilled into the minds of the rising gen- 
eration : 

Section II. And whereas, after a long and bloody contest with a 
great and powerful kingdom, it has pleased Almighty God to restore to 
the United States of America the blessings of a general peace, whereby 
the good people of this State, relieved from the burthens of war, are 
placed in a condition to attend to useful arts, sciences and literature, 
and it is the evident duty and interest of all ranks of people to promote 
and encourage, as much as in them lies, every attempt to disseminate 
and promote the growth of useful knowledge : 

Section III. And whereas, by the petition of a large number of 
persons of established reputation for patriotism, integrity, ability and 
humanity, presented to this House, it appears that the institution of a 
college at the borough of Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland, for the 
instruction of youth in the learned languages, and other branches of 
literature, is likely to promote the real welfare of this State and espe- 
cially of the western parts thereof : 

Section IV. And whereas, this House is informed, as well by the 
said petition as by other authentic documents, that a large sum of 
money, sufficient to begin and carry on the design for some considerable 
time, is already subscribed by the generous liberality of divers persons, 
who are desirous to promote so useful an institution, and there is no 
doubt but that further donations will be voluntarily made, so as to 
carry it into perfect execution ; and this House cheerfully concurring 
in so laudable a work : 



8 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Section V. Be it therefore enacted, and it is hereby enacted by the 
Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
in General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same, That there 
be erected, arid hereby is erected and established, in the borough of 
Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland, in this state, a college for the 
education of youth in the learned and foreign languages, the useful 
arts, sciences and literature, the style, name and title of which said col- 
lege, and the constitution thereof, shall be and are hereby declared to 
be as is hereafter mentioned and defined ; that is to say, 

I. In memory of the great and important services rendered to his 
country by his Excellency, John Dickinson, esquire, president of the 
Supreme Executive Council, and in commemoration of his very liberal 
donation to the institution, the said college shall be forever hereafter 
called and known by the name of "Dickinson College. " 

II. That the said college shall be under the management, direction 
and government of a number of trustees not exceeding forty, or a 
quorum or board therof, as hereinafter mentioned. 

III. That the first trustees of the said college shall consist of the 
following persons, viz : 

His Excellency, John Dickinson, esquire, president of the Supreme 
Executive Council, Henry Hill, James Wilson and William Bingham, 
esquires, and Doctor Benjamin Rush, of the city and county of Phila- 
delphia. 

The Reverend James Boyd of the county of Bucks. 

Doctor John McDowell of the county of Chester. 

The Reverend Messieurs Henry Muhlenburg, A. M., and William 
Handell, and James Jacks, esquire, of the county of Lancaster. 

The Reverend Messieurs John Black, Alexander Dobbins, John 
McKnight, the Honorable James Ewing, esquire, vice-president of the 
Supreme Executive Council, and Robert McPherson, Henry Schlegel, 
Thomas Hartly and Michael Halm, esquires, of the county of York. 

The Reverend Messieurs John King, Robert Cooper, James Lang, 
Samuel Waugh, William Linn, and John Linn, and John Armstrong', 
John Montgomery, Stephen Duncan, Thomas Smith, and Robert Ma- 
gaw, esquires, and Dr. Samuel A. McCoskrey, of the county of Cum- 
berland. 

The Reverend Christopher Emanuel Schulze, and Peter Spyker, 
esquire, of the county of Berks. 

John Anint, esquire, of the county of Northampton. 

William Montgomery and William McClav, esquires, oi tin* county 
"t Northumberla nd. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 9 

Bernard Dougherty and David Espy, esquires, of the county of 
Bedford. 

The Reverend James Sutton and Alexander McClean, esquire, of 
the county of Westmoreland. 

And William McCleary, esquire, of the county of Washing-ton. 

Which said trustees, and their successors, to be elected in the 
manner hereafter mentioned, shall forever hereafter be, and they are 
hereby erected, established and declared to be one body politic and cor- 
porate, with perpetual succession, in deed and in law, to all intents and 
purposes whatsoever, by the name, style and title of "the Trustees of 
Dickinson College, in the borough of Carlisle, in the county of Cum- 
berland ; " by which name and title, they, the said trustees, and their 
successors, shall be competent and capable at law and in equity to take 
to themselves, and their successors, for the use of the said college, any 
estate in any messuages, lands, tenements, hereditaments, goods, chat- 
tels, moneys or other effects, by the gift, grant, bargain, sale, convey- 
ance, assurance, will, devise or bequest, of any person or persons whatso- 
ever, provided the same do not exceed in the whole the yearly value of 
ten thousand pounds, valuing one-half Johannes, weighing nine penny- 
weight, at three pounds ; and the same messuages, lands, tenements, 
hereditaments, and estate real and personal, to grant, bargain, sell, 
convey, assure, demise, and to farm, let, and place out on interest, or 
otherwise dispose of, for the use of the said college, in such manner as 
to them, or at least seven of them, shall seem most beneficial to the in- 
stitution, and to receive the rents, issues, profits, income and interest 
of the same, and to apply the same to the proper use and support of the 
said college ; and by the same name to sue, commence, prosecute and 
defend, implead and be impleaded, in any courts of Law or Equity and 
all manner of suits or actions, whatsoever, and generally, by and in the 
same name, to do and transact all and every the business touching or 
concerning the premises, or which shall be incidentally necessary there- 
to, as fully and effectually, as any natural person or body politic or cor- 
porate within this Commonwealth have power to manage their own 
concerns, and to hold, enjoy and exercise all such powers, authorities and 
jurisdictions as are customary in other colleges in Europe or America. 

IV. That the said trustees shall cause to be made for their use one 
common seal, with such devices and inscriptions thereon as they shall 
think proper, under and by which all deeds, diplomas, certificates and 
acts of the said corporation shall pass and be authenticated, and the 
same seal, at their pleasure, to break, and devise a new one. 

V. That the said trustees of the said college, or nine of them at 
least, shall meet at the city of Philadelphia, on the third Monday in 



10 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

September, instant, for the purpose of concerting- and agreeing- to such 
business as, in consequence of this act, shall be proper to be laid before 
them at the commencement of the work they have undertaken, and shall 
have power to adjourn from time to time, as they shall see cause, to any 
other times and places, for the purpose of perfecting the same. 

VI. That there shall be a meeting of the said trustees held once 
in every year at least, at the borough of Carlisle, at such time as the 
said trustees, or a quorum thereof, shall appoint, of which notice shall 
be given after the first meeting, either by public advertisements in two 
of the public newspapers of Philadelphia six weeks before the time, or 
by notice in writing, signed by the clerk or other officer of the said 
trustees, for that purpose to be appointed, and sent to each trustee, at 
least twenty days before the time of such intended meeting ; and if at 
such meeting nine of the said trustees shall not be present, those of 
them who shall be present shall have power to adjourn the meeting to 
any other day, as fully and effectually, to all intents and purposes, as if 
the whole number of trustees for the time being were present ; but if 
nine or more of the said trustees shall meet at the said appointed times, 
or at any other time of adjournment, then such nine of the said trus- 
tees shall be a board or quorum, and a majority of the votes of them 
shall be capable of doing and transacting all the business and concerns 
of the said college, not otherwise provided for by this act ; and particu- 
larly, of making and enacting ordinances for the government of the 
said college, of electing trustees, in the place and stead of those who shall 
resign their places, or who shall die ; of electing and appointing the 
principal and professors of the said college ; of agreeing with them for 
their salaries and stipends, and removing them for misconduct, or 
breach of the laws of the institution ; of appointing committees of their 
own body to carry into execution all and every the resolutions of the 
board ; of appointing a treasurer, secretary, stewards, managers, and 
other necessary and customary officers, for the taking care of the estate, 
and managing the concerns of the corporation ; and, generally, a ma- 
jority of voices of the board or quorum of the said trustees, consisting 
of nine persons, at least, at any annual or adjourned meeting, after no- 
tice given as aforesaid, shall determine all matters and things (although 
the same be not therein particularly mentioned) which shall occasionally 
arise, and be incidentally necessary to be determined and transacted by 
the said trustees : Provided always, That no ordinances shall be of 
force, which shall be repugnant tO the laws of this state. 

VII. The head or chief master of the Baid college shall be called 
and styled, "The Principal of the College"; and the masters thereof 
shall be called and styled "Professors"; but neither principal nor pro- 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 11 

fessors, while they remain such, shall ever be capable of the office of 
trustee. 

VIII. The principal and professors, or a majority of them, shall be 
called and styled, "The Faculty of the College," which faculty shall 
have the power of enforcing- the rules and regulations adopted by the 
trustees for the government of the pupils, by rewarding or censuring 
them, and finally by suspending such of them, as, after repeated admo- 
nitions, shall continue disobedient and refractory, until the determi- 
nation of a quorum of trustees can be had ; and of granting and con- 
firming, by and with the approbation and consent of a board of the 
trustees, signified by their mandamus, such degrees in the liberal arts 
and sciences, to such pupils of the college, or others, who, by their pro- 
ficiency in learning, or other meritorious distinction, they shall think 
entitled to them, as are usually granted and conferred in other colleges 
in Europe or America, and to grant to such graduates diplomas or cer- 
tificates, under their common seal, and signed by the faculty, to authen- 
ticate or perpetuate the memory of such graduation. 

IX. Persons of every religious denomination among Christians 
shall be capable of being elected trustees ; nor shall any person either 
as principal, professor, or pupil, be refused admittance for his conscien- 
tious persuasion in matters of religion; provided he shall demean him- 
self in a sober, orderly manner, and conform to the rules and regula- 
tions of the college. 

X. As it has been found by experience that those persons separated 
from the busy scenes of life, that they may with more attention study 
the grounds of the Christian religion, and minister it to the people, are 
in general zealous promoters of the education of youth, and cheerfully 
give up their time and attention to objects of this kind ; therefore, 
whenever a vacancy shall happen, by the want of qualification, resigna- 
tion, or decease of any clergyman hereby appointed a trustee, such 
vacancy shall be filled by the choice of another clergyman of any Chris- 
tian denomination, and so toties quoties such vacancies shall happen, 
whereby the number of clergymen hereby appointed trustees shall never 
be lessened. 

XI. No misnomer of the said corporation shall defeat or annul any 
gift, grant, devise or bequest, to or from the said corporation; provided 
the intent of the parties shall sufficiently appear upon the face of the 
gift, grant, will, or other writing, whereby any estate or interest was 
intended to pass to or from the said corporation, nor shall any disuser 
or nonuser of the rights, liberties, privileges, jurisdictions, and authori- 
ties, hereby granted to the said corporation, or any of them, create or 
cause a forfeiture thereof. 



12 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Sec. VI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
the constitution of the said college, herein and hereby declared and es- 
tablished, shall be and remain the inviolable constitution of the said 
college forever, and the same shall not be altered or alterable by any 
ordinance or law of the said trustees, nor in any other manner, than by 
an act of the legislature of this State. 

Sec. VII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said trustees, herein before appointed, and their successors, 
and the principal and professors, and every of them, hereafter to be 
appointed, in such manner and form as herein is directed and required 
before he or they enter upon the duties of their trust or office, shall be- 
fore two Justices of the Peace of the city of Philadelphia, or of some 
county of this State, take and subscribe the oath or affirmation pre- 
scribed by the fortieth section of the constitution of this commonwealth, 
to be taken by the officers of this State, and also the oath or affirmation 
of allegiance directed to be taken by the same officers, in and by the 
seventh and eighth sections of an act of Assembly, made and passed 
the fifth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven 
hundred and seventy-eight, entitled, "A further supplement to the act, 
entitled, 'An act for the further security of the government,' " and shall 
also take an oath or affirmation for the faithful discharge of their trust 
of office aforesaid. 

Passed 9th September, 1783. 



AMENDMENTS. 

AN ACT supplementary to an act, entitled "An Act for the establish- 
ment of a college at the borough of Carlisle, in the county of Cum- 
berland, in the State of Pennsylvania." 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House ofMeprem ntatives 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and if 
is hereby enact( <> by the authority of the same, That persons of everj r 
religious denomination shall be capable of being elected trustees, presi- 
dent, professor, or tutor, nor shall any pupil be refused admittance 
into said college, or denied any of the privileges, immunities, or ad- 
vantages thereof, for or on account of his sentiments in matter! of reli- 
gion ; and that the tenth clause of the fifth section of the Act pasted 
the 9th September, 1783, entitled "An Act for the establishment of a 

college at the borough of Carlisle, i 1 1 the county of Cumberland, in the 
State of Pennsylvania," be and the same is hereby repealed : /'roriifxl. 

Thai nwt more than one-third of the trustees shall at any one time be 

men. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 13 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
the Governor shall annually, on the 1st day of January in each and every 
year, for the space of seven years, draw his warrant on the State Treas- 
urer, in favor of the trustees of said college, for the sum of three thou- 
sand dollars, to be applied to the support of the institution. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it 
shall be the duty of the trustees of the said college, annually on the 1st 
day of January in each and every year, during the said term of seven 
years, to render a statement of the way and manner in which they shall 
expend the said sum of three thousand dollars, annually as aforesaid, 
to the Governor, which said statement shall be by him laid before the 
Legislature : Provided, however, That this act shall not take effect until 
at a general or adjourned meeting of the trustees of said college, called 
for the purpose, they shall accede to the provisions of this act, and shall 
cause a notice under the corporate seal of the college, of such accept- 
ance, to be filed in the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, to 
be obligatory upon them at all times. 

Approved the thirteenth day of February, 1826. 

A SUPPLEMENT to an act entitled "An Act for the establishment of 

a college at the borough of Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland, 

in the State of Pennsylvania." 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is 
hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the principal of the 
college for the time being shall be ex-officio President of the Board of 
Trustees, and have all the rights of any other member of the Board ; in 
case of his absence the members present at any meeting may elect a 
President pro tempore. 

Sec. 2. The Board of Trustees shall have full power from time to 
time to declare the seat or seats of any member or members who shall 
have been absent from the meetings of the Board for two years or up- 
wards vacant, and to exercise like power in reference to any member of 
the Board who shall from any cause be rendered incapable for one year 
of attending to the duties of his office, and in all such cases to fill up the 
vacancies. 

Sec. 3. The discipline of the college shall be essentially vested in 
the professors and faculty, they being held responsible for the proper 
exercise of the same ; they shall have the power of censuring, suspend- 
ing, dismissing, or expelling such of the pupils as may be disobedient 
and refractory, or shall have incurred any such penalty by the commis- 
sion of any offense in violation of the by-laws or statutes of the insti- 



14 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

tution, and no appeal shall be allowed to the Board of Trustees, unless 
in case of expulsion. 

Sec. 4. The oaths and affirmations required to be taken by the sev- 
enth section of the act to which this is a supplement, may be taken be- 
fore any justice of the peace or any judge of any court of record in the 
United States. 

Sec. 5. So much of the original act to which this is a supplement 
as is hereby altered or supplied, is hereby repealed. 

Approved the 10th day of April, A. D., 1834. 

At the term of the Court of Common Pleas of Cumberland county, 
held May, 1879, the trustees of the college presented a petition praying 
that the charter be amended as in said petition specified, to-wit : that 
the term of office of each trustee be limited to four years, but declaring 
the incumbent eligible for re-election; dividing the body into four equal 
classes in such a way that the terms of one-fourth of its members should 
expire each year ; making provision for the declaring of vacancies and 
the filling of the same ; providing that the head or chief master of the 
college should be called the president of the college, and the masters, 
professors ; that the president of the college should be ex-officio presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees, and have all the rights, privileges and 
duties of any member of the Board ; making provision for regular and 
special meetings ; the granting of power to appoint committees of their 
own body to carry into execution all and every the resolution of the 
Board ; to appoint necessary and customary officers for the managing of 
the concerns of the corporation, and appointing the number necessary 
to constitute a quorum. "Whereupon the Court made the following order: 
"In the Court of Common Pleas of Cumberland county, 
"In the matter of the application for the amendment of the charter 
of the trustees of Dickinson College, in the borough of Carlisle, in the 
county of Cumberland. Now, to-wit, 20th June, 1879, the amendments 
to the charter of 'the trustees of Dickinson College, in the borough of 
Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland,' having been heretofore, to-wit, 
on the 26th day of May, 1879, filed in the office of the prothonotary of 
said court, and the notice by advertisement having been in conformity 
with the direction of the Act of Assembly, on motion of W. F, Sadler it 
is declared and decided that the amendments to the* said charter are 
hereby granted as prayed for in the petition of J. A. MeCaulev, presi- 
dent of the corporation ; and it is further ordered and decreed that the 
said amendments shall be recorded in the office for the recording of 

deeds, &C, in the county of Cumberland, and upon .said a inendiuents 

being so recorded the same shall be deemed and taken to be a part of 
the charter of 'the trustees of Dickinson College, in the borough of ^<\\ 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 15 

lisle, in the county of Cumberland,' to all intents and purposes as if the 
same had been originally made a part thereof." 

At the term of the Court of Common Pleas of Cumberland county, 
held February, 1889, the trustees of the college presented a petition 
praying that the fifth and seventh sections of the charter be amended 
as in said petition specified, to-wit, that the requirement of oath or 
affirmation for the induction of trustees into office be changed to a re- 
quirement to subscribe in a permanent record book to an obligation to 
accept the office of trustee and to a promise to discharge the duties with 
diligence and fidelity. Whereupon the court made the following order: 

"And now, to-wit, March 7, 1889, the within certificate having been 
presented, and it appearing that the order of Court heretofore made 
had been duly complied with, it is therefore ordered and decreed that 
upon the recording of the said certificate with the endorsements and 
this decree in the office of the recorder of deeds in and for the said county, 
which is now hereby ordered, the said improvements, amendments or 
alterations shall be deemed and taken to be a part of the charter of the 
trustees of Dickinson College, in the borough of Carlisle, in the county 
of Cumberland." 

At the term of the Court of Common Pleas of Cumberland county, 
held December 15, 1890, the trustees presented a petition praying for 
power and authority to increase the number of trustees from forty to 
fifty, six of the additional ten to be elected by the board as trustees-at- 
large, and the remaining four by the alumni of the college, in such 
manner as the board might direct. Whereupon the Court made the fol- 
lowing order : 

"And now, to-wit, 7th January, 1891, the within certificate having 
been presented, and it appearing that the order of Court heretofore made 
has been duly complied with, it is therefore ordered and decreed that 
upon the recording of the said certificate and its amendments and this 
decree in the office of the recorder of deeds in and for said county, which 
is hereby ordered, the said improvements, amendments and alterations 
shall be deemed and taken to be a part of the charter of the trustees of 
Dickinson College, in the borough of Carlisle, in the county of Cumber- 
land." 



16 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



ALUMINI STATISTICS. 

Graduate Alumni 2824; Non-graduate Alumni 2587; Total 5411 

Legal profession 1040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of United States 1 

Chief Justice of United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant Governors of States 3 

Attorney Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 3^ 

Members of State Assemblies 132 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 3 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church 1 

Presidents of colleges 42 

Heads of professional schools 10 

Professors i n col leges 135 

Superintendents of Schools <>i> 

Principals <>f academies, seminaries and high schools 260 

Instructors in Lower grade schools 610 

N'ni b.— Thli record, II should be observed, doei not iuii\ express Hi>' nsefnl work 
done bj the College, si In the esrllei dsya <>i the Institution the recofdi were bui 
1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 .■ i . ii 1 1 % preset \ ed, 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 17 

BOARD OP TRUSTEES. 

Rev. GEORGE EDWARD REED, S. T. D., LL. D., Ex-Officio. 

REPRESEINTATIVES-AT-LARGE. 

FRANK C. BOSLER,Eso Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1913) . 

Gen. HORATIO C. KING, EL. D Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

JOHN A. SECOR, Esq New York City. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

ALEXANDER PATERSON, Esq Clearfield. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

JAMES G. SHEPHERD, Esq Scranton. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

WILLIAM D. BOYER, Esq Scranton. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

REPRESENTATIVES OF BALTIMORE DISTRICT. 

Rev. Bishop LUTHER B. WILSON, D. D., LL. D Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

THOMAS C. SMITH, M. D Washington, D. C. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Rev. LTTTHER T. WIDERMAN, D. D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

DAVID H. CARROLL, D. D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

HENRY M. WILSON, M. D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

J. HENRY BAKER, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

ISAAC McCURLEY, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Hon. HAMMOND URNER Frederick, Md. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

REPRESENTATIVES OF PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT. 

Rev. FRANK B. LYNCH, D. D Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

Hon. LESLIE M. SHAW Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1914) . 

Rev. WILLIAM L. BOSWELL, D. D Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1911). 



18 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

CHARLES K. 2UG, Esq Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D. D Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

REV. FRANKLIN F. BOND, D. D Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

BOYD LEE SPAHR, Esq Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

REPRESENTATIVES OP CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA DISTRICT. 
Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

JOHN P. MELICK, Esq Harrisburg. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

JOSEPH J. BAUGHMAN, Esq New Cumberland, 

(Term will expire 1913) . 

JOHN S. BURSK, Esq Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

REV. WILLIAM W. EVANS, D. D Harrisburg. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

Rev. WILLIAM A. STEPHENS, D. D Clearfield. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

C. PRICE SPEER, Esq Chambersburg. 

(Tefmwill expire 1914). 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, Jr., Esq Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

WILLIAM L. WOODCOCK, Esq Altoona. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

REPRESENTATIVES Of NEW JERSEY DISTRICT. 
Hon. EDWARD C. STOKES Trenton, N J. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Rev. BENJ. C. LIPPINCOTT, D. D Ooean Grove, N. ./. 

(Term will expire 191 1). 

Rev. WILLIAM P. DAVIS, D. D Salem, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1913). 
REV. GEORGE B. WIGHT, D. D Trtnton, N.J. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

Ckn. .iames K. RUSLING, LL. D Trenton, X. ./. 

(Tei iii will expire 1912). 

D. HARRY CHANDLER, Esq Vineland, N. J. 

(Term will expil I 

<;i;< >RGE D. cii].\< >\vktii, Sc. D Woodbury, V. ./. 

(Tei in will < \ pin 1911). 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 19 

REPRESENTATIVES OP WILMINGTON DISTRICT. 

MELVILLE GAMBRILL, Esq Wilmington, Del. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

REV. THOMAS E. MARTINDALE, D. D Salisbury, Md. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Rev. CORNELIUS W. PRETTYMAN, D. D Snow Hill, Md> 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Hon. JOSEPH E. HOLLAND Milford, Del. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Rev. LOUIS E. BARRETT, D. D Chestertown, Md. 

(Term will expire 1914) . 

CHARLES B. PRETTYMAN, Esq Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Hon. ROBLEY D. JONES Snoiv Hill, Md. 

(Term will expire 1914). 

REPRESENTATIVES OP ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

Philadelphia District. 
CHARLES J. HEPBURN, Esq Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

Baltimore District. 
G. LANE TANEYHILL, M. D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1911). 

Carlisle District. 
HARRY I. HUBER, Esq Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Term will expire 1911) . 

Wilmington District. 
HENRY P. CANNON, Esq Bridgeville, Del. 

(Term will expire 1912). 

OFriCERS OF THE BOARD. 

George Edward Reed, President. 
William W. Evans, Secretary. 
John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

George Edward Reed, Chairman, ex-officio. 
John P. Melick, Edward W. Biddle, 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr., John S. Bursk, 

Charles W. Straw. 



20 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

George Edward Reed, Chairman, ex-officio. 
John P. Melick, Charges W. Straw, 

Edward W. Biddle, John S. Bursk, 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Government and Instruction. 



Cor. W. Prettyman, 
John S. Bursk, 
C. Price Speer, 
John P. Meuck, 
Luther B. Wilson, 
Harry I. Huber, 



Thomas C. Smith, 
Wm. A. Stephens, 

BENJ. C. LlPPINCOTT, 

George B. Wight, 
J. Henry Baker, 
Geo. D. Chenoweth, 



Faculty. 

Luther T. Widerman, William L. Boswell, 
Luther B. Wilson, Joseph E. Holland, 
Charles J. Hepburn, William W. Evans, 
Edward C. Stokes, George B. Wight, 
Hammond Urner, Isaac McCurley, 



Horatio C. King, 
James F. Rusling, 
David H. Carroll, 
Joseph J. Baughman, 
Leslie M. Shaw, 
John P. Melick, 
William D. Boyer, 

Hknry M. Wilson, 
William W. Evans, 
Thos. E. Martindale 

EdwakdM.BiddlE, Jk 
Frank C. Boslkk, 
Jambs F. Rusling, 

David H. Carroll, 

E&DWARD M. BlDDLE,J '••' 

W I i.i.iam I'. Davis, 
Mi.i,\ II. i, i. i> XMUWII.L. 



Finance. 

Boyd L. Spahr, 
Frank C. Boslkr, 
William W. Evans, 
Chas. B. Prettyman, 
Charles K. Zug, 
Isaac McCurley, 
Wm. L. Woodcock, 



Henry M. Wilson. 
Charles W. Straw, 
Louis E. Barrett, 
Henry P. Cannon, 
Robley D. Jones, 
G. Lane Taneyhii.l. 



G. Lane Taneyhill, 
Thos. E. Martindalk, 
Frank B. Lynch, 
Alexander Patkrson, 
William L. Woodcock. 



D. Harry Chandler, 
John A. Secor, 
Edward W. Biddle, 
Henry P. Cannon, 
Alexander Paterson, 
J. Henry Baker, 
Robley D. Jones. 



Vacancies. 

Frank B. Lynch, William A. STEPHENS, 

Luther T. Widkrman, Benj. C. Lippincott, 
Hokatio C. King, William P. Davis. 

Library. 
, Hknry P. Cannon, 
J. Hknry Bakhk, 
Charles w. straw, 

Grounds and Buildings. 

John P. Mki.k k, FRANK C. Hosu R, 

,Ki>wAKi> w. Biddle, John s. Bursk, 
William D. Boysr, Geor< bD.Chenoweth* 

Fr a n k i.i \ i\ Bond, 



Henry M. Wilson, 
Thou \s C. Smith, 
Ch \ki.i s .1. Hepburn. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

PACULTIES. 
I. COLLEGE. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, S. T. D., LL. D., President, 
and Professor of Art of Public Discourse. 

OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph. D., 
Professor of Romance Languages. 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph. D., Dean, 
and Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph. D., 
Thomas Beaver Professor of English and American Literature. 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc. D., 

Susan Powers Hoffman Professor of Mathematics. 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph. D., 
Professor of Physics. 

MORRIS WATSON PRINCE, S. T. D., 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy and Education. 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS, Sc. D., 
Professor of Biology. 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER, A. M., 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

CORNELIUS WILLIAM PRETTYMAN, Ph. D., 
Professor of German Language and Literature. 

MONTGOMERY PORTER SELLERS, A. M., 
Professor of Rhetoric and the English Language. 

HENRY FREEMAN WHITING, Sc. D., 
Professor of Latin and Greek. 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LEON CUSHING PRINCE, A. M., LL. B., 
Professor* of History and Economics. 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph. D., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

GEORGE A. CRIDER, A. M., 
Professor of Social Problems and Business Institutions. 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A. M., 
Adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Physical Director. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SCHAPPELLE, A. M., 
In charge of department of German Language and Literature for year 

1910-11. 

SAMUEL N. BAKER, A. M., 
Instructor in French. 

LUCRETIA JONES McANNEY, M. O., 
Dean of Women and Instructor in Oratory. 

ARTHUR BATES JENNINGS, Jr., 
Instructor in History and Theory of Musi >. 

WESLEY A. HUNSBERGER, S. T. D., 
Assistant to the President. 

OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph. D.. 

Secretary of the Faculty, and Librarian. 

JOHN S. BURSK, 
TYeaswrer. 

SARA M. BLACK, 
Registrar. 

RACHEL TALBOT MORROW, 
((try to President. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 23 

II. SCHOOL Of LAW. 

WILLIAM TRICKETT, LL. D., Dean., 
and Professor of the Law of Real Estate. 

The Honorable WILBUR FISK SADLER, A. M., 

President Judge of the Ninth Judicial District, 

Professor of Practice. 

SYLVESTER BAKER SADLER, A. M., LL. B., 
Professor of Criminal Law. 

A. J. WHITE HUTTON, A. M., LL. B., 
Professor of Laiv of Decedents' Estates and Partnership. 

JOSEPH PARKER McKEEHAN, A. M., LL. B., 
Professor of Law of Contracts and Torts. 

FRANCIS BENJAMIN SELLERS, Jr., A. M., LL. B., 
Professor of Practice. 

WALTER HARRISON HITCHLER, B. L., 
Professor of Equity. 

Ml. CONWAY MALL. 

HEADMASTER. 

WILLIAM ALBERT HUTCHISON, A. M., Ped. D., 
Mathematics. 

MASTERS. 

CHARLES LOWE SWIFT, A. M., 
English. 

JOHN HENRY SUPER, Jr., A. B., 
Latin, and French. 

JAMES HUGH McKEE, Ph. B., 
German. 

CLARENCE GEORGE SHENTON, A. B., 

Greek and Latin. 

WEBSTER STRAYER BLADES, A. B., 

Mathematics and Science. 

JOHN SCOTT CLELAND, A. M., 

History and English. 

THOMAS ELLISON ARNOLD, B. S., 

Mathematics and Science. 

LUTHER E. BASHORE, 
Assistant, Commercial Department. 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A. M., 
Director of Physical Training. 



TREASURER. 

JOHN S. BURSK. 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SPECIAL STAfP 1909-10. 

The Reverend JOHN H. WILLEY, Ph. D., 
Commencement Preacher before College Christian Associations. 

The Reverend FREDERICK F. SHANNON, D. D„ 
College Preacher, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

The Reverend J. HARPER BLACK, D. D., 
Regular Preacher before the College. 

STANDING COMMITTEES— College. 

Government and Discipline. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, JAMES HENRY MORGAN, 

WM. LAMBERT GOODING, JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, MERVIN GRANT FILLER, 

Graduate Work. 

MORRIS WATSON PRINCE, BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, 

MONTGOMERY P. SELLERS. 

Library. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, ( >VANDO BYRON SUPER, 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, LEON CUSHING PRINCE. 

Athletics. 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS, WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, 

F( > R K EST E i T ( ; E N E CR A v i<; R . 

The Faculty Senate Conference Committee. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS 

HENRY FREEMAN WHITING. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 25 

VISITORS TO DICKINSON COLLEGE. 
JUNE, 1910. 

Baltimore. 
Rev. E. C. Guthrie, Rev. F. R. Bayley. 

Central Pennsylvania. 

Rev. D. S. Monroe, D. D., Mr. A. J. Brenneman, 

Rev. H. E. Crow, A. M., Kimber Cleaver, Ph. D., 

Rev. T. S. Wilcox, D. D., J. W. Lowther, Esq., 

Rev. J. S. Souser, Hon. Herbert T. Ames, 

Rev. J. B. Brenneman, Mr. Elmer Hefflefinger. 

New Jersey. 

Rev. John Y. Dobbins, D. D., Rev. Sherman Grant Pitt, 

Rev. George Story Meseroll. 

Philadelphia. 

Rev. Franklin F. Bond, D. D., Rev. George W. Babcock, A. M., 
Rev. W. H. Bisbing, John Walton, Esq., 

Rev. A. W. Witwer, A. M., C. D. Foss, Jr., Esq. 

Wilmington. 

Rev. John M. Arters, A. M., Rev J. Harry Mitchell, 

Rev. W. P. Taylor, A. M. 

Newark. 

Rev. Morris D. Church, Rev. William Redheffer, 

Rev. Edwin L,. Earp, Ph. D. 

New York East. 
Rev. B. F. Gilman, A. M., Rev. W. J. Thompson, D. D. 

Wyoming. 

Rev. George S. Connell, Rev. R. Floyd Eesh, 

Rev. H. W. Thomas. 



26 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

DECREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE. 

JUNE 8, 1910. 

I. MOINORIS CAUSA. 
LL. D.— Doctor of Laws. 

General John C. Black, President of the United States Civil Service 

Commission, Washing-ton, D. C. 
Hon. George R. Willis (Dickinson, '72), Baltimore, M. D. 

D. C. L.— Doctor of Civil Law. 

Ruby R. Vale, Esq. (Dickinson, '96), Philadelphia, Pa. 
D. D.— Doctor of Divinity. 

Rev. Thompson Prettyman Ege (Dickinson, '55), New York City. 

Rev. John H. Hackenberg, Reading, Pa. 

Rev. Morris E. Swartz (Dickinson, '89 J, Clearfield, Pa. 

Rev. John W. R, Sumwai/t, Washington, D. C. 

A. M.— Master of Arts. 

Rev. Edward Hayes, Cumberland, Md. 

Charles Lowe Swift (Dickinson, '04), Carlisle, Pa. 

2. IPS CURSU. 
A. M.— Master of Arts. 

Betts, William Williams, McClintock, Walter John, 

Dickinson, '02. Allegheny, '07. 

Bohner, Edward Ellis, McElwain, Andrew, 

Dickinson, '06. Dickinson, '09. 

Day, John Wiley, Mauch, Russell Charles, 

Waynesburg, '05. Muhlenberg, '07. 

Derick, Charles Bruce, Miller, John Lane, 

Dickinson, '07. Dickinson, '06. 

DeShong, William Wkldon, Moyer, Phil Shive, 

Dickinson, '09. Dickinson, '06. 

Dunning, Charles Crkvkk. Pearce, Elmer Ellsworth, 

Dickinson, '01. Dickinson, '05. 

GIBBS. JAMB8 Warren, Rohrbach, Lewis Guv, 

Dickinson, '09. Dickinson, '07. 

GRBBN, Frank BbLTZHOOVRR, Shki'LKk, Norm \n BRUCB, 

Dickinson, '()<>. Dickinson, '06. 

1 1 m.i,, k M.iMi ( Iwbns, Shilwng, John, 

Dickinson, '06, Dickinson, 'OS. 

Univ. of Pennsylvania, '09. 

Johnson, ETrBD A., Sk ii.i.inc. ton. JAMBS E&DGAR, 

Swarthmore, '"2. Dickinson, 'OS. 

!»\is, EJlwood Wbston, Woodward, Hugh Bbibt&b, 

Dickinson. '05. Dickinson, *"^ 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



'21 



A. B— Bachelor of Arts. 



Balls, Harry John, 
Bean, Albert Morton, 
Blair, Rosannah Greene, 
Craighead, Rebecca, 
Dum, Blanche Lightner, 
Gutbub, Frederick Willia] 
Hartzel, Lina Miller, 
Logan, Henry, 



McIntire, Marjorie Lenora, 
Myers, George Erwin, 
Ramsburg, Ira Calvin, 
Sanderson, Harriet Elliott, 
Shenton, Clarence George, 
Snyder, Ivan Lott, 
Stuart, Hugh Chalmers, 
Wyman, Lillian Katherine . 



Ph. B.— Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Bacon, Anna Maria, 
Baker, George Harold, 
Beauchamp, Levin Creston, 
Behney, Ralph Hook, 
Collins, Betty Louise, 
curran, grathwohl carman, 
Dout, Samuel Reuben, 
Edwards, Walter Vincent, 
Evans, Lucile, 
Filler, Alma Grace, 
Garrison, Englebert Hiles, 
Gooding, Eydia Marian, 
Harnish, Jacob Hiestand, 
Helm, Viola Alice, 
Houck, Frank McGowan, 
Huber, Ira S., 
Judd, Albert Goe, 
Kelbaugh, Charles Henry, 
Ledden, Walter Earl, 
Leinbach, Magdalene Bitzer, 
Levy, Hyman Norman, 
McIndoe, William, 
Maust, Mary Sechrist, 



Mish, George Bitner, 
MtPleasant, Franklin Pierce, 
Mumper, Hewlings, 
Myers, Charles Lewis, 
Porter, Benjamin Franklin, 
Potter, Frances Elizabeth, 
Rawlins, Charles Henry, Jr., 
Richards, Karl Elmer, 
Robley, Mary Alice, 
Sayre, Woodburn Johnson, 
Shepherd, Clarence Moore, 
Stacy, Paul Frank, 
Sisk, Edwin Kerr, 
Steelman, Frank, 
Stevens, Jeannette, 
Stevenson, George Bond, 
Storey, Henry W., 
Stotler, Edgar, 
Tuvin, Louis Alfred, 
Vanneman, Joseph Stephens, 
Wardrop, George Henry, 
Whiteman, Margaret Metzger. 



Sc. B.— Bachelor of Science. 

Earley, Albert. Latham, Arthur, J. 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LL. B. — Bachelor of Laws. 

Branch, Benjamin John H., Hauer, Charles E., 

Brown, William Elmer, Jenkins, Joseph Burnell, 

Bruce, Oliver Herman, Jones, Charles Alvin, 

Butler, James Vincent, Kinard, John Mervin, 

Case, Selden Spencer, King, Horace Brown, 

Cohen, Eugene Gabriel, McClintock, Walter John, 

Collier, Thomas Benjamin, Mauch, Russell Charles, 

Day, John Wiley, Miller, George J. A., 

Easter, Edgar, Moyer, Phil Shive, 

Fetterhoof, Chester Daniel, Silverman, Louis, 

Frantz, Noah H., Wanner, John Peter, 

Grover, Thomas Jefferson, Woodward, Hugh Beistle, 
Zerby, William Aaron. 



COMMENCEMENT HONORS. 

CLASS 1910. 

Tor Excellence in Scholarship. 

Clarence George Shenton, Carlisle. 
Blanche Lightner Dum, Carlisle. 
Magdalene B. Leinbach, Reading. 
Lillian Katharine Wyman, Oxford, N. H. 



Tor. Excellence in Essay and Oratorical Work, Junior and Senior Years. 

Louis Allkkd Tuvin, ETrostburg', Md. 
Albert Gob Judd, Camden, N. J, 
Albert Barley, Hopewell, N. J. 
Walter Earl Lbddbn, Glataboro, N. J. 
GtBokob Harold Bakbr, Aberdeen, m<i 
Frank srii.iMw, Aebunr Park, N. J. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 



COURSES OP STUDY. 

The College offers four parallel courses of study, each covering four 
years. These are the Classical course, the Latin-Scientific course, the 
Scientific course, and the Philosophical course. 

In each of these courses the studies of the first two years arelarg-ely 
required; but in the last two years the work is mostly elective a6 shown 
under Order of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per week, are 
required in the Freshman year, but are elective, three hours each per 
week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course.— Latin is the same as for the Classical 
course but the Greek of that course is replaced by additional studies 
in the Modern languages and in Science. 

Scientific Course. — Latin and Greek are not required, though one of 
these may be offered for admission, a large amount of time being given 
to studies in Science, Mathematics, and Modern languages. 

Philosophical Course. — The requirements for this course are the 
same as for the Latin-Scientific, or Scientific course. In this course, 
however, the required work in the sciences is not so extensive as in the 
Scientific course. 

Law Electives.— Students in the Junior and Senior years are allowed 
to elect law — three hours per week in the Junior, and five hours per 
week in the Senior year. By judicious election and a little extra work, 
students may arrange to save one year in their subsequent course in 
the School of Law. An extra charge, however, will be made when 
law is elected in place of college work. 

Rules Governing Electives.— All elections must be made in May of 
each year, and no student's name will be placed on any class roll until 
all his electives shall have been reported to the Faculty. No student is 
allowed without faculty action to change his electives after the first 
three days of his presence in College. 

Extra Elective Studies.— Any elective studies may be taken as ad- 
ditional work by students pursuing any one of the regular courses for 
graduation, if, in the judgment of the Faculty, such additional work 
will not interfere with their regular studies. This extra election is 
allowable with studies in the School of Law equally with studies in the 
regular college course; and to take the law elective so as to save a year 
in a subsequent course in the School of Law, it is expected that students 
will plan to take at least two hours extra elective work in Law. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Special Students. — Students with uneven preparation may be ad- 
mitted to the College upon showing- by examination or otherwise that 
they are prepared for college work, but no such students will be admitted 
unless fully prepared in English, History, and one other subject of 
college preparation, and no such student will be admitted on less than 
eleven units of college preparatory work, a unit of such work being 
a year's study of some preparatory subject, not less than four periods 
per week. 

Graduate Work.— Graduate work is provided only for the alumni 
of the College who are candidates for the Master's Degree. For further 
information, see Degrees. 

ADMISSION. 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In all 
cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, and, if 
from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the College will 
not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the College. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE. 

Preparatory and High schools of approved standing are allowed by 
the Faculty to examine their own students for admission to the College, 
and such students are admitted to the Freshman class on the certificates 
of their principals that the requirements for admission have been fully 
met. 

Pennsylvania State Normal Schools.— Students completing the 
Regular Course of Study of Pennsylvania State Normal Schools, will 
be admitted to the College as follows: 

To the Classical course when they offer for admission all the Latin, 
the required English, History, and Mathematics, and all the elective 
Greek of the Normal School course. 

To the Latin-Scientific course when they offer for admission all the 
Latin, the required English, History, and Mathematics, and three 
years of French or German, or two years of French or German and one 
year of Science of the Normal School course. 

To the Scientific or Philosophical course when they offer fot ad- 
mission all the required E&nglish, History, Mathematics, and Science, 
at Least two years of Greek or L a tin, and three years of Modern language 
of the Normal School course. For the two yean of Greek or Latin 

may )><• substituted an additional \<-.n of Modern Language, Solid 

i S-eometry, Trigonometry, and advanced or college Algebra, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates covering- the work of college preparation with 
reasonable completeness will be accepted at their face value, but if any 
student is in arrears in his preparation one full year's work in English, 
or more than one year's work in any other study, he will be examined 
on all the work he offers in the subject, or subjects, in which he is thus 
deficient. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the College may or may not 
be accepted, depending on the institution in which the advanced work 
has been done, and the branches of college work for which the certifi- 
cate is offered. In other words, candidates for such advanced standing 
must satisfy the Faculty that they are capable of doing the work of the 
advanced classes for which they apply. 

A certificate to be satisfactory must contain particular statements 
as to the text books used in preparation and the exact amount of work 
done in each study, as explicitly specified in the blank forms furnished 
by the college. 

Blank forms of certificates for work done will be furnished by the 
College on application to the President, and it is expected that these 
certificates will be sent to the College direct from the principal of the 
preparatory school. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation from schools or seminaries 
will not be accepted by the Faculty, unless accompanied by statements 
from the principals or faculties of said schools, that the applicants 
have completed in a satisfactory manner the work required for ad- 
mission to the College, as indicated in its catalog. 

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION. 

Examinations for admission are held on Tuesday of commencement 
week, and on the day before the opening of the fall term. 

Students applying for admission to advanced classes will be exam- 
ined on both the preparatory work for entrance to College and on the 
studies previously pursued by the classes they propose to enter. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman class in the several 
courses will be examined on the following books and subjects: 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Engush. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is 
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division 
into paragraphs. 

1. Reading and Practice. — A certain number of books will be 
recommended for reading, ten of which, selected as prescribed below, 
are to be offered for examination. The form of examination will usually 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

be the writing- of a paragraph or two on each of several topics, to be 
chosen by the candidate from a considerable number— perhaps ten or 
fifteen — set before him in the examination paper. The treatment of 
these topics is designed to test the candidate's power of .clear and accu- 
rate expression, and will call for only a general knowledge of the sub- 
stance of the books. In every case knowledge of the book will be re- 
garded as less important than the ability to write good English. In 
place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an 
exercise book, properly certified to by his instructor, containing com- 
positions or other written work done in connection with the reading of 
the books. In preparation for this part of the requirement, it is im- 
portant that the candidate shall have been instructed in the fundamen- 
tal principles of rhetoric. 

For the year 1911: Group 1. (Two to be selected). 

Shakespeare's As You L,ike It, Henry V, Julius Caesar, The Mer- 
chant of Venice, Twelfth Night. 

Group II. (One to be selected). 

Bacon's Essays; Bunyon's The Pilgrim's Progress, Part I; The 
Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Franklin's Auto- 
biography. 

Group III. (One to be selected). 

Chaucer's Prologue; Spencer's Faerie Queen, (selections); Pope's 
The Rape of the Lock; Goldsmith's The Deserted Village; Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury (First Series) Books II and III, with especial attention 
to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected). 

Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield; Scott's Ivanhoe; Scott's 
Quentin Durward; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables; 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Dickens' A Tale 
of Two Cities; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Blackmore's Iyorna Doone. 

Group V. (Two to be selected). 

Irving's Sketch Book; Lamb's Essays on Elia; De Quincey's Joan 
of Arc and the English Mail Coach; Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Wor- 
ship; Emerson's Essays (Selected); Ruskin'siSesame and Lilies. 

Group VI. (Two to be selected). 

Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's The Lady of the Lake; 
Byron's Mazeppa and the Prisoner of Chillon; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series) Book IV, with especial attention to Wordsworth, 
Keats, and Shelley; Macaulav's hays of Ancient Rome; I'oe's Poems; 
Lowell's The Vision of Sir Liunfal; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustlimj 
Ltongfellow'i The Courtship of Miles Standish; Tennyson's Gareth 
.Hid Lviici te, Launcelol -in<i Blaine, and The Passing 1 of Arthur ; Brown* 
tag's Cavalier Tunes, The L*os1 [Reader, How They Brought The Good 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

News from Ghent to Aix, Evelyn Hope, Home Thoughts from Abroad, 
Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, The Boy 
and the Angel, One Word More, Herv6 Riel, Pheidippides. 

II. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination presup- 
poses the thorough study of each of the works named below. The ex- 
amination will be upon subject matter, form, and structure. In addition, 
the candidate may be required to answer questions involving the es 
sentials of English grammar, and questions on the leading facts in 
those periods of English literary history to which the prescribed 
works belong. 

For the year 1911, the books set for this part of the examination will 
be as follows: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Eycidas, Comus, E'Allegro, and 
II Penseroso, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Wash- 
ington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; 
Macaulay's Eife of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, and the United States. The 
following works will indicate the amount required: Oman's History of 
Greece, Eeighton's History of Rome, (to the close of the reign of 
Augustus), or Smith's Smaller History of Rome, McLaughlin's His- 
tory of the United States for Schools. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; Algebra 
through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, including the solu- 
tion of one hundred or more original exercises. 

Latin. — I. The Eatin reading required of candidates for admission 
to college, without regard to the prescription of particular authors and 
works, shall be not less in amount than Caesar, Gallic War, I-IV: 
Cicero, the orations against Catiline, for the Manilian Law, and for 
Archias; Vergil, ^Eneid, I-VI. 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by the 
schools from the following authors and works: Caesar (Gallic War and 
Civil War) and Nepos (Lives); Cicero (orations, and De Senectute) and 
Sallust (Catiline and Jugurthine War); Vergil (Bucolics, Georgics, and 
iEueid), and Ovid (Metamorphoses, Fasti, and Tristia). 

The latin requirements as stated above are those recommended by 
the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Greek. — Grammar (Goodwin); Xenophon's Anabasis, four books; 
Homer's Iliad, three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day to day 
in preparation is recommended, and ability to write simple Greek sen- 
tences will be required. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LATIIN-SCIEINTINC COURSE. 

a. English, History, Mathematics, and Latin, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

b. French or German. Three years' work, recitations daily, in 
either French or German. Two years' work in French or German will 
be accepted, provided a year's work in either Botany, Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, or Physical Geography is also presented. 

The preparation in French should comprise careful drill in the 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and the 
common irregular verbs, the inflection of adjectives and the use of the 
participles and pronouns, constant attention being paid to pronuncia- 
tion. Much time should be given to translations both oral and written 
of easy English into French. From 600 to 800 pages of graduated texts 
should be read. Where much attention has been given to oral work the 
amount of reading may be diminished. 

Students offering German as an entrance requirement should be 
thoroughly familiar with the essentials of German Grammar; should 
be able to translate easy English into German; should be able to trans- 
late at sight easy German pro9e, and should be able to pronounce with 
a fair degree of accuracy. From 600 to 800 pages of graduated texts 
should have been read. 

SCIEINTIflC COURSE. 

The requirements for admission to the Scientific course are as fol- 
lows: — 

1. The requirements for the Latin-Scientific course; or, 

2. a. Mathematics, English, and History, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

6. Latin or Greek. — Four books of Caesar, or equivalent of Greek. 

c. French or German. Three years' work. Two years' work, 
however, in French or German will be accepted, provided an additional 
year's work is offered in either History or Latin, or the Mathematics of 
the Freshman year. 

d. Science. — Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany, 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 

3. a. English, and History, the same as for the Classical course. 
6. Mathematics. — The entrance requirements for the Classical 

course, and the Mathematics of the Freshman year. 

c. French and German. — Two years' work in both French and 
German. The work required in each language is fully described under 
admission to Latin-Scientific course. 

(/. Science.— Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany, 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 
The requirements for the Philosophical course are the same as for 

the Latin-Scieni iiie or Scientific course. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

ORDER OP STUDIES. 
PRESMMAIN CLASS. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

English.— Rhetoric (Espenshade). Argumentation (Baker). Narra- 
tion (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Baldwin). (Four 

hours per week). 
Greek. — Selections from Thucydides, Herodotus, and Lysias. Prose 

Composition. Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Sight Reading-* 

(Four hours per week). 
History. — Political and' Constitutional History of England. (Two hours 

per week). 
Latin. — Sallust: Bellum Iugurthinum. Livy: Selections. Cicero: De 

Senectute and De Amicitia. Prose Composition. Sight Reading. 

(Four hours per week). 
Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). Plane 

Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — (One hour per week). 

LATIIN-SCIEINTIFIC COURSE. 

English. — Rhetoric (Espenshade). Argumentation (Baker). Narration 

(Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Baldwin). (Four hours 

per week). 
French. — L y Abbe Constantin. Le Petit Chose. Picheur d' Islande. 

La Mere de la Marquise. Grammar and Composition. 
German. — Course C. Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). 

(Four hours per week). 
History. — Political and Constitutional History of England. (Two 

hours per week). 
Latin. — Sallust: Bellum Iugurthinum. Livy: Selections. Cicero: De 

Senectute and De Amicitia. Prose Composition. Sight reading. 

(Four hours per week). 
Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 

Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — (One hour per week). 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

PhlLOSOPMICAL COURSE. 

English. — Rhetoric (Espenshade). Argumentation (Raker). Narration 

(Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Baldwin). (Four hours 

per week). 
French. — V Abbe Constantin. Le Petit Chose. PScheur d* Islande. 

La Mere de la Marquise. Grammar and Composition. (Four 

hours per week) ; or, 
German. — Course C. Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). 

(Four hours per week). 
French. — Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 

hours per week); or 
German. — Course A. (Beginning German), Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der 

deutschen Sprache. (Three hours per week). 
History. — Political and Constitutional History of England. (Two 

hours per week). 
Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). Plane 

Trigonometry (Crockett). ( Four hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — (One hour per week). 

SCIEINTIPIC COURSE. 

Biology. — General Biology (Needham). (Three hours per week for one 

term). 
English. — Rhetoric (Espenshade). Argumentation (Baker). Narra- 
tion (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Baldwin). (Four 

hours per week). 
French. — L'Abbt Constantin. Le Petit Chose. Picluur <V Telande. 

La Mire de la Marquise. Grammar and Composition. (Four 

hours per week); or, 
German.— Course C. Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). 

(Four hours per week). 
History. — Political and Constitutional History of England, (Two 

hours per week). 
L<ogic. — (Three hours per week for one term). 
Mathematics.— Solid. Geometry (Durell). 'Algebra (Wentworth). Plan* 

Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exorcises iu tight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two noun per week , 

( Optional for .ill students. 

Oratory.— (One hour per week). 
Psychoi#ogy, (One hour per week for one tern 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Required Studies. 

Biology. — General Biology (Needham). (Three hours per week for 

one term). 
English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoaat, 

Revised), (Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading-. 

(Three hours per week). 
Logic— (Three hours per week for one term). 
Political Science. — The State. American Government. Constitutional 

Studies. (Two hours per week). 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week for one term). 

Elective Studies. — (Nine hours to be elected). 
Chemistry. — Text-book with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 
^German. — Course A. (Beginning- German). Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch 

der deutschen Sprache. (Three hours per week). 
Greek. — Lucian: Dialogues. Plato: Apology. Sophocles: Oedipus 

Rex. 
Latin. — First half-year: Horace's Odes and Epodes. Second half- 
year: Roman Comedy, Phormio y Andria, Captavi. (Three hours 

per week). 
Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 

(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading- 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week), 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Advanced work with particular reference to the preparation 

and delivery of original orations. (Optional). 

LATIIN-SCIEINTiriC COURSE. 
Required Studies. 

Biology. — General Biology (Needham). (Three hours per week for one 
term). 

Chemistry.— Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 
Revised), (Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading. 
(Three hours per week). 

*Students electing: beginning French or German must continue it at least through 
the Junior year. 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Logic— (Three hours per week for one term). 

Political Science. — The State. American Government. Constitutional 

Studies. (Two hours per week). 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week for one term). 

Elective Studies.— (Six hours to be elected). 
French. — Hernani. Athalie. L'Avare. Les Miserables. Composition 

and Conversation. (Three hours per week); or 

^Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three hours 

per week). 
German. — *Course A. (Beginning German). Spandhoofd's Lehrbuch 

der deutschen Sprache. (Three hours per week); or, 
Course E. Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours 

per week). 
Latin. — First half-year: Horace's Odes and Epodes. Second half- 
year: Roman Comedy, Phoi'mio, Andria, Captivi. (Three hours 

per week). 
Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 

(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory.— Advanced work with particular reference to preparation and 

delivery of original orations. (Optional.) 

philosophical course. 

Required Studies. 

Biology.— General Biology (Needham). (Three hours per week for 

one term). 
Chemistry.— Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 
English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 

Revised), (CunlifFe), with lectures and class and private reading 

(Three hours per week). 
Fkknch. — L'AbbS Conatantin. Le Petit Chose. Picheur (V Islands 

La Mere d< la Marquise. Grammar and Composition. (Four 

hours per week); or, 
(; BR] vi an.— "Course B (Deutohea RefomUesebuch (Savory), Im Vater- 

land (Bacon), German Daily Life. (Three hours per week). 
Logic— (Three hours per week for one term). 
Music. -Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises La sight reading, 

;uk1 practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per v 

< Optional for all students. 

electing beginning F must continue H at least through 

I lie llllliol '. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

Oratory. — Same as in Classical course. 

Political Science.— The State. American Government. Constitu- 
tional Studies. (Two hours per week). 

Psychology. — (Three hours per week for one term). 
Elective Studies.— (Three hours to be elected). 

French. — Hernani. Athalie. L J Avare. Les Miserables. Composi- 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week). 

German.— Course E. Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three 
hours per week). 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week). 

Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. ( Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoasb 
Revised), (Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading. 
(Three hours per week). 

French. — Hernani. Athalie. L 1 Avare. Les Miserables. Composi" 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week); or, 

^Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week); or, 

German. — *Course A (Beginning- German). Spandhoofd's Lehrbuch 
der deutschen Sprache. (Three hours per week); or, 

Course E. Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three 
hours per week). 

Mathematics.— Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week). 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — (Same as in Classical course). 

Physics.— Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

Political Science. — The State. American Government. Constitu- 
tional Studies. (Two hours per week). 

♦Students electing beginning French or German must continue it at least through the 
Junior year. 



40 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

(Sixteen hours to be elected). 

Archaeology. — Lectures and Readings. (One hour per week). 

Botany.— (Three hours per week). 

Chemistry, — *Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week); or, 

Advanced. — (Two hours per week). Laboratory course in Ana- 
lytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week). 

Economics.— Principles of Political Economy (Gide). (Three hours 
per week). 

English Bible. — Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week). 

English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 
(Two hours per week, second half-year). 

English Literature.— Literary Criticism (Winchester), (Manly)- 
(Two hours per week). 

English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 
Header (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year). 

Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year). 

f French. — Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week). 

German.— Course B. Deutsches Beformlesebuch (Savory), Im Voter- 
land (Bacon), German Daily Life. (Three hours per week). 

Greek. — Homer and the Lyric Poets. (Three hours per week). 

Greek Testament. — Selected Books from the New Testament. (Two 
hours per week). 

History.— A Study of Epochs. Political Parties in the United States. 
(Four hours per week, Fall and Winter terms). 

Latin. — Literature of the Silver Age. Readings from Seneca, Pliny 
the Younger, Martial, and Juvenal. (Three hours per week). 

Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week). 

Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 
Problems. (One hour per week). 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading 1 , 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week 1 . 
Optional for all students. 

< iraToky.- Lectures on Oratory and Orators. (Optional). 

Physics. — *Text-book, with lectures. (Two hems per week). Labo- 
ratory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

I iei Physics 01 Chemistn with corresponding Lsboi musl bed 

Chemisti \ v\.i- i.ii. in in 1 he Sophomon 
(si. ins beg-innii musl continue th< subject through the Senioi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

Psychology.— (Three hours per week, first half-year;. 

Social Problems. — Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 

lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 

the year). 

LATIIN-SCIEINTIPIC COURSE. 

Required Studies. 

Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week). 

Elective Studies. — (Thirteen hours to be elected). 
Botany. — (Three hours per week). 
Chemistry. — Advanced. (Two hours per week). Laboratory course 

in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week). 
Economics.— Principles of Political Economy (Gide). (Three hours 

per week). 
English Bible. — Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week). 
English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 

(Two hours per week, second half-year). 
English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester), (Manly). 

(Two hours per week). 
English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 

Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year). 
Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year). 
French. — Hernani. Athalie. L'Avare. Les Miserables. Composi- 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week). 
German.— Course B. Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory), Im Vater- 

land (Bacon). German Daily Life. (Three hours per week); or, 
Course F. Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week). Note. — 

This course is open only to students who have had at least three 

years of German. 
History.— A Study of Epochs. Political Parties in the United States. 

(Four hours per week, Fall and Winter terms). 
Latin. — Literature of the Silver Age. Readings from Seneca, Pliny 

the Younger, Martial, and Juvenal. (Three hours per week). 
L aw. —Criminal Law. (Three hours per week). 
Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 

Problems. (One hour per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. (Optional). 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half year). 



42 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Social Problems. — Practical Sociology (Wrig-ht), supplemented by 
lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 
the year). 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Required Studies. 

Botany. — (Three hours per week). 

Chemistry.— Advanced. (Two hours per week). Laboratory course 

in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week). 
Physics. — Advanced. (Three hours per week). Laboratory course. 

(One period of two hours per week). 

Elective Studies. — (Five hours to be elected). 
Economics. — Principles of Political Economy (Gide) . (Three hours per 

week). 
English Bible. — Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week). 
English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 

(Two hours per week, second half-year). 
English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester), (Manly). 

(Two hours per week). 
English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 

Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year). 
Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year). 
French.— Hernani. Athalie. L'Avare. Les Miserables. Composi- 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week). 
German. — Course B. Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory), Im Vater- 

land (Bacon). German Daily Life. (Three hours per week); or, 
Course F. Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week, second 

half-year). Note.— This course is open only to students who 

have had at least three years of German. 
History. — A Study of Epoetin. Political Parties in th< United States, 

(Four hours per week, Fall and Winter terms). 
L aw. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week). 
Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 

Problems. (One hour per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization, (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
OkaTORV. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. (Optional). 

Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year). 
Social PROBUkits.— Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented bj 
Lecturea and laboratory work. (Three hours per vreek throughout 

til • y u 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 43 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 

(Sixteen hours to be elected). 
Botany. — (Three hours per week). 
Chkmi9Try. — Advanced. (Two hours per week). Laboratory course 

in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week). 
Economics.— Principles of Political Economy (Gide) . (Three hours per 

week). 
English Bible.— Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week). 
English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 

(Two hours per week, second half-year). 
English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester), (Manly). 

(Two hours per week). 
English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 

Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year). 
Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year). 
French. — Hernani. Athalie. L'Avare Les Mish'ables. Composition 

and Conversation. (Three hours per week); or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 

hours per week). 
German. — Course B. Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory), Im Vater- 

land (Bacon). German Daily Life. (Three hours per week); or, 
Course F. Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week). Note. — 

This course is open only to students who have had at least three 

years of German. 
History. — A Study of Epochs. Political Parties in the United States. 

(Four hours per week, Fall and Winter terms). 
Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week). 
Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 

Problems. (One hour per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. (Optional). 
*Physicf. — Text book with lectures. (Two hours per week). Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week). 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year). 
Social Problems.— Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 

lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 

the year). 



*Physics must be taken, unless it was taken in the Sophomore year. 



44 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SENIOR CLASS. 

CLASSICAL, LATIIN-SCIEINTIFIC, OR PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 

(Sixteen hours to be elected from the following-, not before taken, 

and for which the student is prepared). 

American Literature.— Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast), (Pag-e), with Lectures and class and private readings. 
(One hour per week). 

Archaeology. — Lectures and Readings. (One hour per week). 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week). 

Business Institutions. — Economic History of the United States (Bogart), 
supplemented by lectures, and laboratory work. (Three hours per 
week throughout the year). 

Chemistry.— Advanced. (Two hours per week). 

Christian Evidences. — (Two hours per week, last fourth of year). 

Education.— Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week). 

Electricity. — Electricity and Magnetism (Thompson). (Three hours 
per week, for one term). 

English Drama.— Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 
week). 

French. — Hernani. Athalie. L 1 Avare. Les Miserables. Composi- 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week); or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster), Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week). 

Geology.— (Two hours per week). 

German.— Course D. Goethe's Dramas and Longer Poems, Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell. (Three hours per week); or, 

Course F. Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week). Note. — 
This course is open only to students who have had at least three 
years of German. 

Greek.— Homer and the Lyric Poets. (Three hours per week). 

Greek Testament. — Selected Books from the New Testament. (Two 
hours per week). 

History. — Civilization in Europe. (Two hours per week, three-fourths 
of the year). 

History OF Commerce.— Lectures in connection with International 
Law. 

International Law. — International Law. Lectures, with the study 
of cases. (Two hours per week). 

Latin. -Cicero, Works and Literary Influence. Tacitus. Roman Po- 
litical institutions. (Three hours per week). i ( »ii-i2. a study of 
\Yi "g ii and his Work*, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 45 

Law.— (Five hours per week). 

Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 
Problems. (One hour per week). 

Music— Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading-, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory.— Original work in making orations, with particular atten- 
tion to public delivery. 

Philosophy. — (Three hours per week). 

Physics. — Advanced Course. (Three hours per week for two terms). 

Laboratory course: Physical experiments and measurements in 
heat, light, and electricity. Photographic practice. (One or 
two periods of two hours per week). 

Zoology. — (Two hours per week). 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 
Required Studies. 

Chemical Laboratory. — (Two periods of two hours per week). 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week); or, 

Geology. — (Two hours per week). 

Oratory. — Original work in making orations, with particular attention 
to public delivery. 

Physical Laboratory.— (Two periods of two hours per week). 

Zoology. — (Two hours per week). 

Elective Studies.— (Eight hours to be elected). 

American Literature. — Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast), (Page), with lectures and class and private readings. 
(One hour per week). 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week); or, 

Geology. — (Two hours per week). 

Business Institutions.— Economic History of the United States (Bogart), 
supplemented by lectures, and laboratory work. (Three hours 
per week throughout the year). 

Chemistry. — Advanced. (Two hours per week). 

Christian Evidences.— (Two hours per week, last fourth of the year). 

Education. — Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week). 

Electricity. — Laboratory. (Two hours per week). 

English Drama. — Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 
week). 

French.— Hernani. Athalie. V Avare. Les Miserables. Composi- 
tion and Conversation. (Three hours per week); or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three hours 
per week). 



46 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

German. — Course D. Goethe's Dramas and Longer Poems. Schiller's 

Wilhelm Tell. (Three hours per week); or, 
Course F. Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week). Note.— 

This course is open only to students who have had at least three 

years of German. 
History. — Civilization in Europe. (Two hours per week, three-fourths 

of the year). 
History of Commerce — Lectures in connection with International 

Law. 
International Law.— International Law. Lectures, with the study of 

cases. (Two hours per week). 
Law.— (Five hours per week). 
Mathematics. — Solid Geometry. (C. Smith). (Two hours per week). 

Problems. (One hour per week). 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in sight reading-, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week). 

Optional for all students. 
Philosophy. — (Three hours per week). 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 



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DICKINSON COLLEGE 49 

METHODS OP INSTRUCTION. 

BIOLOGY. 

Professor Stephens. 

General Biology.— General Biology is required of Freshmen in the 
Scientific and Philosophical courses and of Classical and Latin-Scien- 
tific Sophomores. The course consists of two two-hour periods of lab- 
oratory work per week and one hour per week of lecture and recitation 
for one term. This is an elementary course designed to meet the needs 
of the general student. 

Botany. — This course is intended to serve as an introduction to 
Botany, and as a basis for further study. The morphology, physiology, 
and histology of plants are treated as fully as time permits. This is 
followed by a consideration of the principles of classification of plants, 
and a systematic study of the more important orders of cryptograms 
and phaenogams. The course consists largely of laboratory work. Dur- 
ing the spring term considerable time is given to field work, affording 
the student the opportunity to become acquainted with the local flora, 
particularly from the ecological standpoint. 

Zoology. — The course in Comparative Zoology, consisting of lec- 
tures and laboratory exercises, extends throughout a year, two two- 
hour periods a week. The course is devoted to a general consideration 
of the subject, and to a careful study of the life-history of type forma 
and to such comparison of these with related forms as to exemplify the 
modifications of structure which characterize the several branches of 
the animal kingdom. A large part of the time is given to work in 
the laboratory. The purpose is to present a course of study adapted to 
the needs of the general student, and to present the main facts and 
principles of the science as a foundation for further study. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Shadinger. 

The Chemical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the east wing of 
the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. The main laboratory contains 
desks for ninety-two students. The smaller laboratory for advanced 
work accommodates twenty-four. Each student is furnished with a desk 
and apparatus necessary for the performance of the experiments under 
the supervision and instruction of the professor. 

Lecture Courses. 1. Instruction in general Inorganic Chemistry 
is given to all students in the Sophomore year (except those of the 
Classical course electing Chemistry or Physics in the Junior year). 
This course comprises two periods per week of lectures and recitations 



50 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

and one two-hour period per week of laboratory work throughout the 
year. The aim of this course is to cover the fundamental principles of 
the science in connection with the descriptive chemistry of the non- 
metallic elements. The elements of Theoretical Chemistry are taught, 
and the students given practice in stoichiometrical and other chemical 
problems. 

2. An elective course of two hours per week throughout the year de- 
voted to the principles of theoretical and physical chemistry, such as the 
kinetic-molecular hypothesis, theory of solution, atomic hypothesis, 
chemical equilibrium, theory of dissociation in solution, electrolysis, 
and the laws of mass action. This is followed by a study of the metal- 
lic elements based upon the periodic system. Prerequisite: Course 1. 

3. Organic Chemistry. An elective course of two hours per week 
throughout the year, devoted to the principal classes of organic com- 
pounds, aliphatic and aromatic, with emphasis upon class reaction and 
the structural theory. Prerequisite: Course 1, and preferably Course 2. 

Laboratory Courses. 1. The laboratory work of the first year con- 
sists of the performance by each student of a series of experiments, 
illustrating the important general principles and facts of the science, 
the properties of the more important non-metallic elements, and the 
laws of chemical action. The details of the manipulation of these ex- 
periments are given; but with a view to cultivating the powers of ob- 
servation, the student is required to observe carefully and describe 
clearly the results of each experiment. 

2. Followingthis work of the first year, Qualitative Analysis is taken 
up, the usual course of preliminary work and analysis of simple and 
complex substances being pursued. The ionic theory and laws of mass 
action are applied to this work. 

3. A course in Organic Preparations to accompany lecture course 
3. Laboratory work in the preparation and purification of compounds 
selected from the aliphatic and aromatic series for the illustration of 
important synthetic reactions: verification of the constants of these 
compounds; methods of organic analysis. 

4. A course in Quantitative Analysis in its several branches. The 
work comprises a series of experiments which illustrate the fundamea 
tal principles of gravimetric and volumetric methods. The course is 
flexible, and great latitude will be allowed students manifesting in 
terest and ability. 



ENGLISH BIBLE AIND EVIDENCES. 
PXOFSSSOB M. W, P*INCB- 






The course in the Knglish Bible is designed to serve as an intro- 
duction to the history and Litem tun* of the Bible. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 51 

The aim is to present in a thoroughly scientific manner the fruits 
of the most recent investigations in their bearing on the Bible, to meet 
with honesty and candor the difficulties which have arisen in inquiring 
minds, and to furnish such guidance in methods and in bibliography as 
to render later study more easy and profitable. From these various 
means it is believed that there results not only a broader and profounder 
knowledge of the facts of the Bible, but also a sounder faith in its mis- 
sion. 

Students who contemplate a course in theology after the attainment 
of their baccalaureate degree, and who have followed the courses in 
the Greek New Testament and English Bible, will have anticipated 
much of their theological course, and will be able either to finish their 
seminary course earlier, or will have time for special concentration upon 
more advanced work in these or other departments of theological dis- 
cipline, while those proposing other forms of service, in business or 
professional life, will gain through the study of the English Bible a 
reasonably thorough equipment for the proper discussion and under- 
standing of those living questions of the age concerning which no in- 
telligent man can afford to be ignorant. 

Evidences. — Christian Evidences is elective in the Senior class two 
hours per week during the spring term. 

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

Professor McIntire. 

English Literature. — All Sophomores pursue a course in English 
literature of three hours per week during the year. An outline of the 
history of the literature is seeured from the study of Pancoast's Revised 
Introduction to English Literature. The more important periods and 
phases of the literature are dwelt upon in lectures, which are repro- 
duced by the students in both recitation and examination. Every third 
recitation is given to the critical reading of selected classics from the 
"Century Readings in English literature" of Cunliffe, Pyre, and 
Young. In connection with these class readings, instruction is given 
in the principles of criticism. Every member of the class must also 
choose one of several elective courses of private reading. Each read- 
ing course is planned to consume several hours a week, and is intended 
to foster the love and appreciation of good literature without the stim- 
ulus of the class and the presence of the teacher. Flexibility is secured 
by allowing each member of the class to consult his own taste in the 
election of his reading course. An examination on these readings is 
held near the end of each term. 

Literary Criticism. — An elective course in the principles of literary 
criticism is offered to Juniors. The work is based on Winchester's 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Some Principles of Literary Criticism, and Manly's English Poetry. 
Every important phase of the discussion is illustrated by the study of 
examples from English literature; so that the course is also a critical 
study of English poetry. All students who are permitted to elect the 
American literature and the English drama of the Senior year must 
have taken this course. 

English Drama. — A course in English drama is open to a limited 
number of those Seniors who have taken the elective English literature 
of the Junior year. In this course special attention is given to the his- 
tory, the technical structure, and the literary characteristics of the Eliza- 
bethan drama. Some of the most important of Shakespeare's plays are 
analyzed at first, and from these as a basis the works of Shakespeare's 
contemporaries are studied by comparison. The method of teaching 
consists of lectures, readings, essays, and discussions. 

American Literature. — The course in American literature is elective 
for Seniors who have studied the Laterary Criticism of the Junior year. 
The subject is treated not only from a literary standpoint, but also as 
the exponent of our national life, and endeaver is made to trace the de- 
velopment of American thought. Pancoast's Introduction to American 
Literature and Page's The Chief American Poets are used as text- 
books, and lectures are also given on the more important periods of our 
literary history. In addition to the text-book and lectures every mem- 
ber of the class is required to elect one of the courses of private reading 
offered in American poetry, prose, and political literature, upon which 
he will be examined, the aim being not merely to foster a love of pure 
literature, but to stimulate independent criticism as well. The course 
occupies one hour per week during the Senior year. 

GEOLOGY. 

Professor Stephens. 

A course in Geology, two hours a week throughout the year, is elec- 
tive for Seniors. 

Museum. — The museum contains specimens in mineralogy, lith- 
ology, and geology, adapted to instruction, including a collection of 
minerals bequeathed to the college by S. A. Ashmead, Esq., of Phila- 
delphia, and a suit of one hundred and forty rocks of the Mt. Blum 
chain, added by J. W. Hendrix, M. D., to supplement a platter model o 
that chain, previously presented by President Durbin. 

GERMAN. 
Prof kss< »ks i » ■ kit y m a n ami Bchapfbua 
The work In German beglna In the [freshman year for those students 
in the Latin-Scientific, Scientific, and Philosophical courses irho offed 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 53 

German for admission to College. Other students may begin the study 
of German in the Sophomore year. The following courses are offered 
during the year 1910-11. 

Course A.— (Beginning German). Spanhoofd'sL,ehrbuch der deut- 
schen Sprache. Supplementary Readings. (Three hours per week). 

Course B. — (Second year). Deutsches Roformlesebuch. Supplemen- 
tary Readings. (Three hours per week). 

Course C. — (Third year). Readings. German Prose Composition. 
(Four hours per week). This course is for Freshmen who offer Ger- 
man for admission. 

Course D. — (Third year). Goethe's Dramas and Poems. (Three 
hours per week). This course is for students who have taken, in col" 
lege, courses A and B. 

Course E. — Schiller's Dramas and Poems. (Three hours per week)^ 
This course is for Sophomores who offered German for admission. 

Course F. — Goethe's Faust. Lectures and Readings. This course 
is for Juniors and Seniors who offered German for admission. 

GREEK. 

Professor Morgan and Professor Whiting. 

Classical Greek is required of Classical Freshmen four hours per 
week, and is elective for the rest of the college course three hours per 
week. 

The Freshmen read various authors, and special emphasis is laid 
upon Greek Syntax and Greek Composition, with a view to the rapid 
reading of Greek in the subsequent years of the course. 

The Sophomores read Plato's Apology and Crito, making a study 
of the life and methods of Socrates; and some Greek tragedy, and L*u- 
cian's Dialogues. 

One course in Classical Greek is offered for Juniors and Seniors to- 
gether. To avoid repetition of work by any student, the course is 
changed from year to year. This elective in 1910-11 will be devoted to 
Homer and the Iyyric Poets. 

New Testament Greek. — In the Junior and Senior years two hours 
per week may be elected in New Testament Greek. During the two 
years it is thus possible to read a large part of the New Testament in 
the original Greek. A careful study is made of the vocabulary of the 
New Testament, with the view to making it easy for the student to read 
at sight. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 
Professor Prince and Professor L,eon C. Prince. 

European Civilization is elective to Seniors, Guizot's Lectures form- 
ing the basis of the work. Supplementary lectures are given from time 



54 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

to time, according- to the demands of the subject. The course occupies 
two hours per week during- the year. 

International Law is offered as an elective for Seniors, two hours 
per week throughout the year. Supplementary lectures on the History 
of Commerce are given in connection with the development of the Eaw 
of Neutrality. 

English history is required of Freshmen throughout the year. The 
course is based upon text-book study and supplementary lectures. 

A Study of Epochs. — This course is open to Juniors, four hours per 
week during the first half-year. It gives special attention to the de- 
velopment of the American colonial and state governments, the growth 
of the national idea, the constitutional controversies of our national 
life, and the history of political parties. 

Political Science. — Nature and functions of government. Govern- 
ment in America. Government in Europe. Constitutional History of 
the United States. 

Economics. — This course is an elective for Juniors, three hours per 
week throughout the year. Founded upon the text-book, which is sys- 
tematically studied, the work departs widely from the ordinary reci- 
tation system, being directed not only to familiarizing the students 
with the theories of the professional economists, but to the develop- 
ment of his own thought along economic lines. The theoretical and 
philosophical phases are first considered and mastered, after which the 
practical applications of the subject are taken up. Present day topics 
are assigned for special research, and the results reported are fully dis- 
cussed in the class room. Special attention is devoted to subjects of 
particular public interest, sueh as the tariff, the trusts, and labor prob- 
lems. 

LATIIN. 

Professor Filler and Professor Whiting. 

Four courses are offered, varying from year to year in the works 
read but not in the general plan. 

For the present year they are as follows: 

1. (Repuired of Freshmen in the Classical and L,atin-Scientitic 
courses). Emphasis is laid upon Syntax and the mastery of the art of 
translation. The prose of Sallust, Livy, Cicero, forms the basis of this 
work. Four hours. 

2. (Elective for Sophomores). A study o\~ the Manner and Cus- 
toms <>f the Romans, with reading*! from Horace, Plautua, Terence. 
Three hours. 

3. (Elective for Juniors and Seniors). A ttudy of the Silver Age, 

its life and literature. Three hours. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

4. (Elective for Seniors who have taken the three courses above). 
A study of Cicero's works with some regard to his literary fame and in- 
fluence. Lectures on Roman Political Institutions. Three hours. 

Preparation for Teaching Latin.— In Course 4 the last term will be 
devoted in part to the needs of those preparing- to teach. One author 
of the college preparatory course, Caesar, Cicero, or Vergil, will be made 
the subject of study. 

MATHEMATICS AMD ASTRONOMY. 

Professor L,andis and Adjunct Professor Craver. 

Mathematics. — The following course is required of all Freshmen: 
Algebra (the binomial theorem, choice, chance, variables and limits, 
theory of numbers, determinants and theory of equations), Solid 
Geometry, and Plane Trigonometry. 

The elective work of the Sophomore year consists of the Analytic 
Geometry of the conic sections with a discussion of the general equa- 
tion of the second degree, and of a course in Calculus, including differ- 
entiation, integration, maxima, and minima, differentials, partial de- 
rivatives, and some geometrical applications. 

The following courses in Mathematics are open to Juniors and 
Seniors: 

a. Analytic Geometry (poles and polars, diameters, abbreviated 
notation, etc.) and special topics in Calculus, including further geomet- 
rical and mechanical applications. (Two hours per week). 

b. Projective Geometry. (Two hours per week). 

c. Analytic Geometry of the quadric surfaces, curves in space, 
and surfaces in general. (Two hours per week). 

d. Differential Equations. (Two hours per week). 

e. Theory of Functions. (Two hours per week). 

/. Problems in Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, etc., Spherical 
Trigonometry, with application to Astronomy, and the use of the ephe- 
meris. (Two hours per week). 

g. Surveying. (Two hours per week with four hours field work 
per week, during first term. 

Other courses may be substituted for these, if desired. 

Astronomy. — A course in general Astronomy, of two hours per 
week, is elective for all Seniors. 

Observatory. — The Observatory is provided with an acromatic 
telescope, manufactured by Henry Fitz, of New York. This telescope 
has an object glass of five inches with a focal distance of seven feet, 
is equatorially mounted and furnished with right ascension and declina- 
tion circles. There is also a five-inch reflecting telescope, a sextant 
reading to ]/ z \ and other instruments. 



56 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

HISTORY AND THEORY OF MUSIC. 

Mr. Jennings. 

History of Music. — This is a literary course, open to students of all 
classes as an optional course, which does not require special prepara- 
tion. For 1911-12, Pratt's History of Music will be used as a text-book. 
Lectures are given, dealing- with important epochs. Essays are occa- 
sionally prepared by the students, and examinations held from time to 
time. This course covers the history of music from the earliest times 
to the present. The lives of the great composers are also studied and 
their influence on musical art carefully noted. Examples from the 
works of the masters illustrative of the early classical, the later classi- 
cal, the transitional, the romantic and the modern periods are com- 
pared and studied in detail, and every phase of the art from the histori- 
cal and aesthetic standpoint is carefully investigated. 

Musical Analysis and Form.— (Lectures). The elements of nota- 
tion, meter, rhythm, motives, phrases, section, period, exceptional 
period forms, two part primary form, extension, abbreviation, develop- 
ment of the motive, variation, composite primary forms, the rondo, the 
sonatina and the sonata, vocal forms, dances, and folk-songs. This 
course is fully illustrated. It also provides instruction in the origin, 
development, and employment of orchestral instruments. 

Harmony. — No special preparation or technical skill is required for 
this course. The subjects treated are: intervals, the major and minor 
scales, triads and their inversions, the different kinds of sevenths and 
their inversions, cadences, modulation, suspensions, modern four-part 
writing, accompaniment, and the harmonizing of given melodies, and 
ear training. 

Musical Societies.— A Male Glee and Mandolin Club, also a Ladies' 
Chorus will be maintained as heretofore, open to all members of the 
student body possessing the necessary vocal requirements. 

Concerts and Recitals. — In addition to the regular class work, re- 
citals will be given from time to time. 

ORATORY. 

President Reed and Mrs. McAnney. 

The work to be done will comprehend matters pertaining to the 
art of public discourse. Practical drill in voice building, dcchunat ion. 
and kindred matters, will be required of the Freshman class, tour hours 
in each month. In the Junior year, lectures on the general subject of 
oratory and orators will constitute a main feature Ot the instruct ion, 

while from the Senior class extensive original work in the making of 
orations, with public delivery of the same, will be required. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 57 

PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION. 

Professor Gooding. 

Logic. — Ivogic is required of the Sophomore class three hours per 
week for the winter term. The purpose of the course is to prepare the 
student for psychology, ethics, and philosophy, by disclosing- to him 
the character of reasoning and familiarizing him with the nomenclature 
of the subject. 

Psychology. — Psychology is required of the Sophomore class three 
hours per week for the spring term. In addition to the inculcation of 
the facts and principles of the subject, the attention of the student is 
turned to his own states of consciousness so that the habit of introspec- 
tion may be formed. An elective of three hours per week for the first 
half-year is offered the Junior class. 

Philosophy. — Philosophy is a three hour a week elective open to 
Seniors. With Paulsen's Introduction to Philosophy as a basis, the 
student is introduced to a consideration of such questions as materialism, 
theism, evolution, and the theory of knowledge. Instruction in the 
History of Philosophy is based on Rand's Modern Classical Philosophers. 

Education. — Education is a three hour a week elective open to 
Seniors. The aims of the department are to impart to the students 
processes directly applicable to the work they will have to do, to give 
them a professional conception of their work by familiarizing them with 
the history of educational theories and practices, to secure to them poise 
and steadiness in the consideration of new educational questions, to 
teach them to investigate, and to inform them of the philosophical and 
psychological foundations of education. 

The methods are a series of talks on the teaching of the elementary 
subjects, based on "The Report of the Committee of Ten," observation 
of the schools of Carlisle, an assignment of some particular subject 
being made to each member of the class, the teaching of which he is to 
observe and report upon; a study of the educational classics themselves, 
L/Ocke, Rousseau, and Pestalozzi, being the authors chosen; lectures on 
the History of Education; investigations and papers by students, and 
the study of some text which treats of the psychological and philosoph- 
ical phases of education. 

Ethics. — Ethics is a three hour a week elective for the second half- 
year, open to Juniors. The Greek conception of Ethics is studied in 
the representative thinkers, and appreciation secured by comparison 
with modern theories and practices. The Christian conception is de- 
veloped largely through its antithesis to the Greek, and the contribution 
of Christianity to social amelioration noted. The types of ethical 
theory under the modern names intuitionism, rationalism, self-realiza- 



58 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

tion, Hedonism, utilitarianism, and teleological energism are critically 
studied, and an attempt is made to lay down a standard of right. In- 
cidentally the questions of pessimism and the theory of evil are examin- 
ed, and the course is concluded by a study of the virtues and duties. As 
far as practicable, papers are read by members of the class on subjects 
suggested by the work. The text-book used is Paulsen's A System of 
Ethics. 

physics. 

Professor Mohi,br. 

The physical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the west end of 
the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. There are four laboratories 
for students' and instructors' use, and a well-equipped workshop. The 
physical apparatus includes a good equipment for lectures and demon- 
stration and a collection of instruments for elementary and advanced 
laboratory work. 

1. A course of two hours per week throughout the Junior year. In 
this course the general laws of mechanics, sound, and electricity are 
presented. The lectures are illustrated by experimental demonstra- 
tions of all important phenomena. This course is required in the 
L,atin-Scientific and Scientific courses. In the Classical course, either 
this course with laboratory course 4, or a corresponding course in 
chemistry, is required. 

A preparatory course in physics will be of great value in connection 
with this course, and is therefore urgently recommended to students 
preparing for college. 

2. Elective advanced course of three hours per week throughout the 
Senior year. In this course the subjects of heat, light, and electricity, 
are taken up and fully illustrated. 

3. An elective laboratory course in electricity, two hours per week. 

4. Laboratory course of two hours per week in the Junior and 
Senior years. This is required in the Scientific course and in the Junior 
year of the L,atin-Scientific course, and is also required in the Junior 
year in the Classical course, if Chemistry is not elected. Juniors, how- 
ever, electing chemistry and chemical laboratory may elect course 1 
without course 4. 

Students pursuing a special or partial course without a view to 
graduation will be admitted to this course and to courses 1 and 2 when 
they shall have passed the mathematics of the Freshman year. 

The work done in the laboratory is almost exclusively quantitat ive 
in character. It Lt designed particularly to acquaint the student with 
phjtica! measurement and modern method! Of laboratory work, and to 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

cultivate habits of accuracy of observation, closeness of attention, and 
clearness of thought. Full notes of all work done are required. 

The course is continuous, and includes: 

Mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases. 

Sound. — Velocity of sound, comparison of tuning- forks, and laws 
of strings. 

Heat. — Testing thermometers, the air thermometer, expansion of 
solids and liquids, calorimetry, and radiation. 

Light. — Curvature and focus of lenses and mirrors. Photometry, 
interference of light. Spectroscopy and the theory of optical instru- 
ments. 

Electricity. — Electrical and magnetic measurements and constru- 
tion of electrical machines. 

Photography. 

3. Advanced laboratory work. 

RHETORIC AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

Professor Seiners. 

Rhetoric and Composition.— Graded work in English composition 
is continued throughout the four years of the College course. 

Four hours a week during the Freshman year are devoted to a 
thorough study and drill in the elements of rhetoric and composition. 
Espenshade's Essentials of Composition and Rhetoric and Baldwin's 
College Manual and Rhetoric form the basis of the work. 

In addition to brief statements of principles and ample illustrations 
weekly exercises in construction are presented by each student. 
Laboratory work in composition affords the pupils the personal atten- 
tion of the instructor during the process of composing. One hour a 
week is devoted to the study of standard prose, selected with reference 
to the particular phase of the subject under discussion. Specimens 
of descriptions, narration, exposition, and argumentation are carefully 
read and criticised. Essays are required of the Sophomores and Jun- 
iors each term, and the Juniors and Seniors write orations for public 
delivery. 

Old English. — An elective course in Old English is offered to 
Juniors two hours a week during the first half of the year. Smith's 
Old English Grammar and Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader are used. 
The purpose of the course is to provide a foundation for the historical 
study of English, and for thorough work in English literature. Those 
intending to take this course must elect the History of the English 
Language also. 

History of the English Language.— This course is elective to Juniors 
two hours a week during the second half of the year. The first part 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

of the course will be devoted to the general historical development of 
the language, after which the principles of English etymology and the 
history of inflections will be studied. Particular attention will be paid 
to the Old and Middle English periods. I^ounsbury's History of the 
English Eanguage forms the basis of the work. Those intending to 
take this course must elect Old English also. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGE— FRENCH. 

Professor Super and Mr. Baker. 

French is open to all courses for from two to five years, depending 
on the course of study pursued by the student. 

The instruction in this department is based on the theory that the 
ability to read at sight ordinary French texts is likely to be of more 
value than such limited ability to speak this language as can be ac- 
quired in the regular routine of the class-room. For this reason, easy 
texts and those of a colloquial character are usually preferred to the 
classics, in order that a larger amount of reading may be done and the 
student's vocabulary enlarged as rapidly as possible. A greater 
command of the written language will thus be obtained than when a 
smaller portion is read with greater attention to grammatical details. 
Some of the reading matter for the class is also selected with a view to 
giving the pupil some idea of the history of the country while he is 
studying its language. Some attention is given to reading aloud, both 
by the instructor and the pupil, chiefly for the purpose of teaching 
pronunciation, and much stress is laid on sight translation. Advanced 
students are likewise required to do some reading outside of the regular 
class-room work. 

SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND BUSINESS INSTITUTIONS. 

Professor Crider. 

Beginning with the academic year 1910-11, there was instituted in 
the College the first section of The Department of Peace and Public 
Service, namely, the section devoted to Social Problems and Business 
Institutions. It is hoped that in the near future other sections of the 
general department mentioned may be established. 

Social Problems. — The course in the study of Social Problems, elec- 
tive to Juniors, is based upon "Practical Sociology," by Carrol D. 
Wright, as a text-book, the study of the text being supplemented by 
lectures on particular topics of sociological interest, oral discussions 
conducted by member! of the class, and laboratory work under conduct 

of the head of the department. 

Business Institutions.— The course La Butineai Institutions is based 
Upon "'I'll-- Iv <>.i Lc HUtory Oi the United States," by Bogart, as a 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 61 

text-book, supplemented by lectures, and laboratory work on the part 
of the student. The course is open to Seniors, three hours per week, 
throughout the year. The aim of the course is to give to the student a 
general idea of the industrial and commercial development of the United 
States, the progress made in the development of the natural resources 
of the Republic, and the openings to men of ability in the business life 
of the nation. Two or three times in each month experts in business 
of various forms are introduced as lecturers upon questions of special 
and peculiar interest. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Forrest E. Graver, Director. 

Throughout the entire year two hours per week are required of all 
under-classmen. This work is done out of doors during open weather 
and in the gymnasium when outdoor conditions are unfavorable for 
tennis, football, crosscountry running, track work, etc. 

Before entering the gymnasium students are subjected to a care- 
ful physical examination, repeated at subsequent intervals during the 
course. The heart and lungs are tested, and by measurements and 
muscle tests, the physical condition of the student is ascertained. From 
these data, exercises suitable to individual peculiarities, varying 
strength and conditions, are prescribed to produce a symmetrical de- 
velopment and insure perfect health. The possible evils of competitive 
sports are guarded against, and no minor is permitted to compete in 
intercollegiate contests without the written consent of parent or guar- 
dian, a certificate of physical ability from the Director, and proper 
training- under his supervision. 

MATERIAL EQUIPMENT. 

Grounds and Buildings.— The campus includes a full square of the 
borough of Carlisle, purchased of the Penns by the corporation. Upon 
it are grouped most of the buildings of the College proper. In 
addition the College owns the Law School building, Conway Hall, Denny 
Hall, South College, and L,loyd Hall; also a fine and well-equipped 
athletic field. 

West College (1804), built of native limestone, trimmed with red 
sandstone, is one hundred and fifty by fifty-four feet. It is four stories 
high and contains commodious accommodations for the Young Men's 
Christian Association and dormitories for sixty-five students. 

Cast College (1836), also of native limestone, one hundred and thirty 
by forty-two feet and four stories high, is used solely for dormitory 
urposes, and will accommodate one hundred and ten students. 



62 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Jacob Tome Scientific Building (1884), the gift of the late Honor- 
able Jacob Tome, of Port Deposit, Md., i9 of native limestone trimmed 
with Ohio sandstone. It is one hundred and eighty-four feet long and 
fifty-six feet wide, and combines with a highly attractive architectural 
appearance perfect adaption to the uses for which it was designed. The 
west wing contains complete provision for a college department of 
physics, including lecture-room, office of professor, private laboratory, 
large laboratory for general use, fifty-three by twenty-two feet, three 
smaller laboratories, a work shop, and minor apparatus rooms. The 
east wing contains similar ample provision for the chemical depart- 
ment, and the center is occupied by a large and handsome museum hall, 
having a central height of forty feet, adapted to the preservation and 
display of the collections of the College, required for the illustration of 
geology and mineralogy. 

The apparatus employed for illustration in the general courses of 
study in physics and chemistry is valuable, and annually increasing. 
The apparatus in the laboratories is adapted to the wants of students in 
the several courses. 

The James W. Bosler Memorial Library hall (1885) in architectural 
design, as in material and construction, is an admirable structure. It 
is the gift to the College of the widow of him whose name it bears, and 
in whose honor it was conceived and built. The cost of the building 
was about seventy thousand dollars, and in addition, over six thousand 
dollars were expended in its furnishing. It supplies accommodations — 
substantially fire-proof — for the College and Society libraries, and an 
audience hall seating eight hundred persons. In this building the valu- 
able libraries have not only complete protection, but also the requisites 
for convenient use and proper display, with room for growth to thrice 
their present number of volumes. A commodious and elegant reading 
room is also provided. 

The Denny Memorial Building.— The Denny Building, occupying 
the site of the first Denny Building, destroyed March 3d, 1904, was com- 
pleted and dedicated June 6th, 1905. The first story is of Hummelstown 
brownstone with the second and third stories of dark iron-clay pressed 
brick, secured in Ohio. At the northwest corner stands the handsome 
clock tower known as the Ignore Allison Clock Tower, the gift of Wil- 
liam C. Allison, E&sq., of Philadelphia. 

The building is distinctively memorial in character. In it are 
eleven large recitation rooms, each with an office adjoining*, and, in 

addition, three Large hails, for the use respectively, of the Literarj 

societies of the College, tWO Of Which date hark mOTi than one hundred 

years. The various rooms are designated as follows:— Keasler-McFad- 
den Hall, Smith Hall, Carroll Hall, Btepheo Greene Hall, Herman Hall, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 63 

Reed Hall, Patton Hall, Lindner Hall, Durbin Hall, Lawton Hall, Trick- 
ett Hall, Hoyt-Haight Hall, Prettyman Hall, McCrea-E}arp Hall, Crider 
Hall, Crawford Hall, and Peirce Hall, each with an appropriate in- 
scription tablet recording- the name of the party in whose honor the Hall 
is named, together with that of the party establishing the memorial. 

The building contains also the lecture room, laboratories and collec- 
tions of the biological department of the College. 

The laboratories are large, exceptionally well lighted, and 
thoroughly equipped with microscopes, mirotomes and other apparatus 
essential to the work of this department. 

For this splendid building, costing over $70,000, the College is in- 
debted, as the inscription over the main entrance records, to the gener- 
osity of public spirited citizens of Carlisle, members of the college 
community, alumni, and thoughtful friends throughout the country. 

The Gymnasium furnishes ample accommodation to meet all the 
modern demands for judicious physical training during the period of 
student life. The main hall, seventy-five feet in length by forty in 
width, is flanked on the eastern and western extremities by wings, of 
which the one, in dimensions eighty-four feet by twenty, contains the 
base ball cage, while the other, sixty feet by twenty, is used for offices, 
bathing and dressing rooms. It is provided with a running gallery, hav- 
ing a track of two hundred and thirty-five feet in length, bath rooms, 
dressing rooms, and offices, completely fitted up and furnished with 
proper appliances. 

Lloyd Mall, located on Pomfret street, near the School of Law, is 
used for the accommodation of the young women attending the College. 
The building, of brick, with large grounds adjoining, thoroughly fur- 
nished, heated by steam, and provided with every comfori and conven- 
ience, constitutes a beautiful and commodious home for ladies who are 
non-residents of the town. 

South College, on a lot two hundred and fifty by two hundred and 
forty feet, is used for dormitory purposes, save the first floor, which is 
reserved for recitation rooms and offices, and the College Commons. 

Heating of Buildings.— All buildings are heated by steam from a 
central plant. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Athletic Field.— This field, the 
gift of the Hon. and Mrs. Edward W. Biddle, of Carlisle, in memory of 
their lamented son, Herman Bosler Biddle, class of 1903, is a tract of 
land of more than six acres, located on the Chambersburg turnpike 
(Main street extended) easily accessible from the College, and admira- 
bly adapted to the purposes for which it has been prepared. The field 
is entered at the northeastern corner through a gateway, most artistic- 
ally designed. On the western side is a splendid grand stand, which 



64 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

will accommodate nine hundred and fifty spectators. In front of the 
grand stand stretches the straightaway track, twenty feet in width, 
the same forming- a section of the quarter-mile track, every part of 
which is in full view of the stand. Within the ellipse formed by the 
track is located the diamond and gridiron required for baseball and 
football work. On the eastern side are five model tennis courts. The 
field was dedicated with impressive ceremonies, June 8, 1909, and is one 
of the most beautiful and attractive athletic fields in the country. 

The College Commons.— Located in South College, and provided 
with accommodations for eighty-five students, is a boarding department 
under the direct supervision of college students, where excellent board 
is furnished at cost rates. 

hospital. — Located in Carlisle is an excellent hospital, the gift to 
the town of Mrs. Sarah A. Todd, to which students are at any time ad- 
mitted, and where they are under the care of experienced physicians 
and nurses. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

The Library, available to all students, under established regula- 
tions, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — that of 
the College proper, which is exceedingly rich in old volumes and in 
reference books in certain departments— and those of the Belles Lettres 
and Union Philosophical Societies, accumulated by them during the 
century and more of their existence. These three libraries are in or- 
ganization one not only by reason of their arrangement, but by the 
registration of the books of all in a single catalog, on the card plan, 
which renders books in any of the collections easy of reference. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, of Cur- 
wensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of establishing a Library 
Fund, together with the cordial co-operation of the Alumni Library 
Guild Association, the College is now able to make substantial additions 
annually to the resources of the Library. 

The Reading Room, in the same building, and adjacent to the 
Library, is roomy, well-lighted and furnished with the best of reading- 
room appliances. Its files are supplied with representatives of the best 
secular and religious papers, while many of the best American and 
foreign magazines are upon its tables. Students are thus enabled to 
keep familiar with the daily news, and also to become acquainted with 
the best current literature of the world. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Kxamination of Candida 1 el tot .id mission will take plaee on Tues- 
day of Commencement week, and on the day before the opening ol the 

l'a 11 term. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 65 

Examinations will take place at the close of the Fall, Winter, and 
Spring terms, at mid-year, or by special action of the Faculty, upon 
the completion of an integral part of any subject. 

DECREES. 

The following degrees in cursu are conferred by the College: 

Bachelor of Arts. — The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Classical course. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. — The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy is 
conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Latin- 
Scientific and Philosophical courses. 

Bachelor of Science. — The degree of Bachelor of Science is con- 
ferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Scientific 
course. 

Master of Arts. — The degree of Master of Arts in cursu will be con- 
ferred on those graduates of the College who shall have completed a 
course of study prescribed by the professors in the several departments 
and approved by the Faculty, and who shall have passed a satisfactory 
examination thereon at the seat of the College not later than May 15th 
of any year. Examinations will be conducted in May of each year by 
the several professors under whose direction the studies shall have 
been pursued. A charge of twenty dollars will be made for the exami- 
nation, one-half of which shall be payable when the student registers, 
which must be by October 15th. Graduates of reputable colleges who 
shall complete in a satisfactory manner the course of the School of Law 
are eligible for the degree of Master of Arts, in cursu. All recipients of 
the degree will be charged the usual diploma fee of five dollars. Ap- 
plication for information respecting the Master's degree must be made 
in writing to Dr. Morris W. Prince, Chairman of Committee on Grad- 
uate Work. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Devotional services are held in the James W. Bosler Memorial Li- 
brary Hall every morning and all students are required to be present. 
Students are also required to attend the regular morning preaching 
service of the church elected. 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE. 

The government and discipline of the College are vested exclu- 
sively in the Faculty of the College, although the regulation of certain 
functions which have particular reference to the life of the student body 
is left largely to the determination of the students themselves. A copy 
of the Rules and Regulations established by the Trustees for the 
government of the College and the ordering of her work is placed in 



66 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

the hands of each student upon matriculation, and he is expected to 
conform to the rules and regulations to which he subscribes. Conduct 
inconsistent with the general good order of the institution, if repeated 
after admonition, is followed by suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. 

Any student found guilty of dishonesty in an examination or writ- 
ten recitation, will be suspended for a period of not less than four weeks. 
Such student will be required to go to his home and his parents or guar- 
dian will be notified of the facts in the case. 

Report of attention to College duties and of the deportment of each 
student is made at the close of each term to the student himself, if of 
legal years, otherwise to his parent or guardian. Special reports will 
be sent out whenever deemed necessary by the Faculty. 

COLLEGE BILLS. 

General charge to students in college dormi- 
tories $100.00 per year. 

Room rent 12.00 to $35.00 per year. 

Laboratory — Botanical, Chemical, Physical, 

Anatomical, or Zoological, each 12.50 per year. 

Laboratory— Biological 5.00 

Athletic charge, unanimously recommended 

by students 5.00 per year. 

Charge for "The Dickinsonian," unanimously 

recommended by students 1.00 per year. 

General charge to students not in College 

dormitories 85.00 per year. 

Athletic and Laboratory charges as above. 

Students presenting scholarships will be credited on general charges 

for their face value. 

LLOYD MALL. 

For ladies residing in Lloyd Hall the total charge is $350.00 per 
year, payable in three installments within ten days of the opening of 
each term, or within ten days of their arrival. This sum— $350.00 — will 
cover all expenses for furnished rooms, bed furnishing, lights, steam 
heating, board, everything, indeed, save personal laundry, books, and 
laboratory charges. All ladies, non-residents of the town, must room 
in the Hall, save by special permission of the President. Charges for 
ladies residing at home are as indicated above for "Students not in 
college dormitories." 

PAYMENT Of BILLS. REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

When two students from the same family are present in the College 
.it tin- same time, a reduction of ten per eent. is made. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 67 

Students who, at their own request, are permitted to room alone, 
are charged the full rent of the room. 

Students non-resident in the town, who are permitted for any 
reason to room in the town, are charged at resident rates. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent themselves 
from college work for the whole or major portion of any term, and who 
present themselves for examination in said work, will be charged one- 
half of the regular rate. 

During- the college year two bills are presented, one for the Fall 
term and the other covering- the charges for the Winter and Spring- 
terms combined. It should be observed that the Fall term bill is for 
two-fifths of the academic year, and the combined Winter and Spring 
term bill is for the remaining three-fifths. This latter may be paid in 
two installments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days following 
the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once and will be 
required by the noon of October 15th following. 

The combined Winter and Spring- term bill will be presented within 
the ten days following the opening of the Winter term. Payment is 
expected at once and will be required by the noon of January the 25th. 
If paid in two installments, the one for the Winter term and the other 
for the Spring term, payments must be made by January the 25th and 
by April the 15th, respectively. 

Extension of time will not be granted for the payment of bills unless 
written application on forms to be provided by the treasurer is made be- 
fore the dates set for their payment. Failure to attend to this matter 
will render a student liable to exclusion from recitations or from College. 
No reduction on any term bill will be allowed for less than four weeks of 
continuous absence, for any cause, during any part of any term. For 
a period of absence in excess of four continuous weeks a reduction of one. 
half the pro rata, or weekly, charge will be allowed. 

N. B. — Beginning with the academic year 1911-12, every student con- 
nected with the College and every student proposing entrance will be re- 
quired to show a receipt signed by the treasurer of the College for the 
sum of ten dollars before being admitted to the work of the class with 
which he is associated, the said sum to appear as a credit on the college 
bill for the Fall term. The same rule will be observed at the opening of 
the Winter term. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft or 
money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

Rooms. — The rooms in the College are secured to the students dur- 
ing term time only. 



68 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Damage. — The occupants of each room are held accountable for 
any damage to the room, and cost of same must be paid promptly on 
presentation of bill. Any student proved to be guilty of wilful destruc- 
tion of, or damage to, college property, may be required to pay not 
only the cost of replacement, or repair, but also a fine as determined by 
the Faculty (not to exceed ten times the cost of repair), said fine to be 
placed to the credit side of the Special Damage Account. When the 
parties injuring property are unknown, the cost of repairs is assessed 
toward the close of the college year upon the whole body of students, 
as a special damage account. 

No student can have honorable dismissal or certificate of progress 
in his studies, until his bills have been duly adjusted. 

GOWNS, MOODS, AND CAPS. 

The College has adopted the regulations for academic caps and 
gowns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 1895. 

1. Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black stuff 
gown of the Oxford shape but with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson college may wear on all fitting occa- 
sions a black stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood lined with red 
silk, crossed by a chevron of white, six inches in breadth. 

3. Masters of Dickinson college may wear on all fitting occasions 
a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors. 

4. Doctors of Dickinson college may wear on all fitting occasions 
a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors, 
trimmed around the exterior edge with a cord or with a band, not more 
than four inches wide, of silk, satin or velvet, distinctive of the depart- 
ment to which the degree pertains, as follows: Doctor of Literature, 
white; Doctor of Divinity, scarlet; Doctor of Laws, purple; Doctor of 
Philosophy, blue; Doctor of Science, gold yellow. 

With the gown will be worn the Oxford cap, of serge for under- 
graduates and of broadcloth for graduates, with black tassels, except 
the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of velvet with tassels in 
whole or part of gold thread. 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, during their 
term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the doctor's degree, with 
the hood appropriate to the degree that they severally have received. 
Members of the Board of Trustees, or of the Faculty, who have receievd 
degrees from other universities or colleges, shall be entitled to wear the 
costume appropriate to the same degree from Dickinson college, to Long 
;is they shall retain their official eonnection with the College. The 
President of the College may adopt such distinetive eostuine or badge 
as he shall choose, not inconsistent with the foregoing regulations. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 69 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS. 

Literary Societies.— The Belles L,ettres and the Union Philosophical 
societies, purely literary in their character, nearly coeval in origin 
with the founding- of the College, have been maintained in continuous 
operation throughout its history. Their associatons are among the 
fondest memories of college life, and not the least of the advantages of 
college residence is the special training they impart. The halls in 
which the literary societies meet, ample in size and thoroughly equip- 
ped, are not surpassed by those existing for similiar purposes in any of 
the colleges or universities in the country. 

The General Belles Lettres and the General Union Philosophical 
societies, as distinguished from the active societies, include with the 
active members, graduates, former active members, and honorary mem- 
bers. They hold annual meetings during commencement week, at which 
business especially restricted to the general societies is transacted. 

The Harman Literary society is the organization of the young 
ladies, and was founded in 1896. 

On recommendation of the Faculty, at the meeting of the Trustees 
held June 13, 1893, the following regulations with respect to the liter- 
ary societies were ordered. 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical con- 
test in connection with the College, who shall not have been a member 
of one of the literary societies for at least three-fourths of the time of 
his connection with the College. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of com- 
mencement day, who shall not have been a member of one of the liter- 
ary societies for at least one-half of the time of his connection with 
the College. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the College who shall not 
have made satisfactory adjustment of his financial obligations to the 
literary society of which he has been a member. 

Young Men's Christian Association.— This Association in the Col- 
lege is well organized, and does a most useful work. A very large ma- 
jority of the students are actively connected with the Association, and 
are zealous to forward its work. Its contribution to the safety of young 
men removed for the first time from the restraints of home life can 
hardly be overestimated. It furnishes a point about which the religious 
life may center. 

Chapel Hall — the old Chapel — has been fitted up for the Association 
and makes a most attractive room for all public occasions and meetings. 
During the summer of 1903, three commodious rooms adjoining Chapel 
Hall were fitted up for the various social features of Association work. 
These are used as parlors for social purposes, and for the Sabbath Bible 



70 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Study classes. Altogether the equipment of the Association admirably 
meets Association needs, and is a great stimulus to the religious life 
of the College. 

Alumni Associations.— The Trustees in 1891, ordered that the alumni 
be divided into four geographical districts, centering respectively in 
Baltimore, Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Carlisle, and that the alumni 
of each district elect a trustee, to be known as an alumni trustee, 
having all privileges of trustees of the College. These district alumni 
associations meet at such times as they may elect. The General 
alumni association will meet during Commencement week, and may 
elect visitors to the Board of Trustees, as heretofore. 

Phi Beta Kappa Society.— In September, 1886, the Alpha chapter of 
the Phi Beta Kappa society, the first in the State of Pennsylvania, was 
organized. Only students finally passed for graduation are eligible to 
membership, and of these only those of high class standing or giving 
promise of unusal achievement. Graduates of former years, not be- 
low the first fourth of their classes, and men of eminence in professional 
life are also eligible to membership. 

The Dickinson Library Guild. — The Dickinson Library Guild is a body 
composed of alumni and friends of Dickinson college organized for the 
purpose of creating a permanent endownment for the College Library. 
Membership in the Guild shall consist of all persons whopledge an annual 
contribution to the permanent endownment fund of the Library. The 
membership shall be classified into five classes, or groups, as follows: 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 
11 B, " " " from five to ten " " " 

ll C> *< II II three 

" D, " " " two 

it ^ it u it one 

In accordance with the action of the Board of Trustees of the Col- 
lege, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the permanent en- 
dowment fund of the Library, the proceeds of which shall be devoted 
to the sole purpose of purchasing books by the Faculty Committee on 
Library. The current expenses of the organization shall be otherwise 
provided for. 

Directors of the Library Guild. 

President— Bradford O. McIntikk, Ph. D. 
Secretary and Treasurer— Mkrvin (1. Fii.i.kr, A. M., '93. 
John M. Kiiky, Kso., '83; J. KlRX BOSMCK, E&8Q M '97; J. Krnkst 
Crank, '11. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 71 



Officers of the General Alumni Association. 

President— Gen. Horatio C. King, LL. D. 
Vice-President— Mary C. Love Collins, A. M. 
Secretary— Montgomery P. Sellers, A. M. 
Treasurer— George L. Reed, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

The Alumni Fund Committee. 

David H. Carroll, D. D., '68; Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; 
Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80; John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. 
Boyer, Esq., '88; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; A. C. T. McCrea, 
D. D., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; William A. Jordan, Esq., '97; 
Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. Burchenal, Esq., '00; T. Leon- 
ard Hoover, A. M., '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00; George H. Bon- 
ner, Esq., '01; Mr. Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Mr. Frank D. Law- 
rence, '02. 

Officers. 

Chairman— Henry P. Cannon, Esq., Bridgeville, Del. 
Vice-Chairman— George D. Chenoweth, Sc. D., Woodbury, N. J. 
Secretary— Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa. 
Treasurer — Montgomery P. Sellers, A. M., '93, Carlisle, Pa. 

Executive Committee. 

Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., 
'92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; T. Leonard Hoover, A. M., '00; Mr. 
Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Mr. Frank D. Lawrence, '02; Boyd LEE 
Spahr, Esq., '00, Secretary, 1242 Land Title Building-, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Officers of the Philadelphia Alumni Association. 

President— Henry C. Longnecker, D. D. S. 

Vice-President— George D. Chenoweth, Sc. D. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Thomas S. Lanard, Esq. 

Executive Committee — Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq.; Frysinger Evans, 
Esq. ; Charles K. Zug, Esq. ; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq. ; Rev. Thomas 
W. Davis; William P. String, A. M. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — Charles J. Hepburn, 
Esq. 

Address of the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Officers of the Wilmington District Alumni Association. 

President — Rev. Elmer L. Cross, Ped. D. 
Vice-President — Hon. Thomas N. Rawlins. 



72 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Secretary and Treasurer— Rev. John J. Bunting, A. B. 
Executive Committee — Rev. Rai,ph T. Coursey, A. M.; Henry P. 
Cannon, Esq.; John D. Brooks, A. M. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — Henry P. Cannon, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Marion Station, Md. 

Officers of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alumni Association 

President— Rev. Rogers Israel, D. D. 
Secretary and Treasurer — William M. Curry, Esq. 
Executive Committee — William D. Boyer, Esq.; George C. 
Yocum, Esq.; Lorrie R. Holcomb, Esq. 

Address of Secretary, Connell Building-, Scranton, Pa. 

Officers of the Carlisle District Alumni Association. 

President — Prof. Alexander H. Ege. 
Secretary and Treasurer — F. Harry Hoffer, Esq. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

Officers of the Baltimore District Alumni Association. 

President— Harry L. Price, Esq. 

First Vice-President— Isaac T. Parks, Jr., Esq. 

Second Vice-President — Hon. Hammond Urner. 

Treasurer — Mr. Carl F. New. 

Recording Secretary— Mr. William H. Davenport. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mr. Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. 

Executive Committee — G. Eane Taneyhill, M. D.; J. Frederick 
Heisse, D. D.; James C. Nicholson, D. D.; David H. Carroll, D. D.. 
William W. Strong, Ph. D.; Hon. George R. Willis; Wilbur M; 
Pearce, M. D. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — G. Eane Taneyhill, 
M. D. 

Address of Secretary, 305 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md. 

Officers of the New York Alumni Assocation. 
President— Gen. Horatio C. KING, L,L. D. 
Secretary and Treasurer— II akky J. Sondhkim, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, 51 Chamber! street, New York City. 

Officers of the Dickinson Club of New York City. 
President— Wiu.iam J, She irer, Pbd. D. 
Vice-President — Mk. Robbrt K. Mc.\i.\km.v. 
Secretary and Treasurer Rippby T. Sadlbb, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 73 

Executive Committee— Mr. Rhky T. Snodgrass; Harry I. Huber, 
Esq.; Mr. Frank D. Lawrence; Thomas J. Towers, Esq.; Eloyd W. 
Johnson, A. M. 

Address of the President, 110 West 34th street, New York City. 

Officers of the General Union Philosophical Society. 

President — Gen. Horatio C. King, EE. D. 
Vice-President — Gen. James P. Rusling, EE. D. 
Secretary — Rev. Charles W. Straw, D. D. 
Treasurer — Prof. Oun R. Rice, A. B. 

Executive Committee — James H. Morgan, Ph. D.; D. Wilbur 
Horn, Ph. D.; Irvin E. Kline, A. M. 

Officers of the Active Union Philosophical Society. 

President — Karl K. Quimby, '11. 
Vice-President— Richard A. Shields, '12. 
Recording- Secretary — Allan P. Bubeck, '13. 
Corresponding- Secretary — J. Roy Jackson, '14. 
Critic— Frank E. Moyer, '11. 
Treasurer — Harry Evaul. '12. 
Censor — Howard D. Evans, '13. 
Clerk— Harry E. McKeown, '13. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— J. Ernest Crane, '11. 

Executive Committee— J. Ernest Crane, '11; Harry Evaul, '12; 
Franklin A. Kuller, '14. 

Officers of the General Belles Lettres Society. 

President — Ovando B. Super, Ph. D. 
Vice-President— Charles K. Zug, Esq. 
Recording Secretary— Rev. Ulysses S. G. Wright, A. M. 
Executive Committee— Ovando B. Super, Ph. D.; Edward M. 
Biddle, Jr., Esq., John F. Mohler, Ph. D. 

Officers of the Active Belles Lettres Society. 

President— James H. Hughes, Jr., '11. 
Vice-President— Forrest E. Adams, '11. 
Recording Secretary— Ernest H. SELLERS, '12. 
Corresponding Secretary — William S. Black, '12. 
Treasurer — David H. Biddle, '12. 
Critic— Earl D. Willey, '11. 
Clerk— Howard W. Selby, '13. 



74 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Officers of the Harman Literary Society. 

President — Manetta E. Kilmore, '11. 
Vice-President — Grace S. Strock, '11. 
Secretary — Irene Briggs, '11. 
Treasurer — Helen S. Gerhard, '13. 

Officers of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

President — Henry F. Whiting, Sc. D. 
Vice-President — Mervin G. Filler, A. M. 
Secretary — John F. Mohler, Ph. D. 
Treasurer— Forrest Fv. Craver, A. M. 

Officers of the Y. M. C. A. 

President— Harry Evaul, '12. 
Vice-President— Carlton R. Van Hook, '12. 
Corresponding- Secretary — B. Olcott McAnney, '13. 
Recording- Secretary— Fenimore S. Johnson, '13. 
Treasurer — Richard A. Shields, '12. 

Officers of the Y. W. C. A. 

President— Clara Bell Smith, '11. 
Vice-President— M. ElETa Witmer, '11. 
Secretary— M. EJlma Roberts, '12. 
Treasurer— Carrie S. Smith, '12. 

Officers of College Student Assembly. 

President— J. Leeds Clarkson, '11. 
Vice-President— Harry K. Hoch, '11. 
Treasurer — C. L,eRoy Cleaver, '11. 
Secretary— Charles M. L,odge, '11. 

(The above named students occupy the same positions, respectively, 
on the Exective Committee of the Senate). 

The Senate. 

President — J. Leeds Clarkson, '11. 

Vice-President— Hakry K. Hoch, '11. 

Treasurer— C. LeRoy Clkavkr, '11. 

Secretary— Charles M. L,odgh, '11. 

Allen P. Hokn, '11; Thomas B. Miu.kk, '11; Victor H. Bokll, 'HI 

h. Munson Corning, 'll; s. Wai.tkk Stauffbr, '12; Robsax a. car- 
ton, (President, Sophomore Class); Louis K. Lamhokn, (Prealdent, 

Krcshman Class). 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 75 

Officers of the College Athletic Association. 

President— John E. Felton, '12. 

Vice-President— George B. Marshall, Eaw, '12. 

Secretary— Addison M. Gooding, '14. 

Treasurer— Ernest H. Sellers, '12. 

Assistant Treasurer— W. Howard Sharp, '13. 

Advisory Committee— Proe. Henry M. Stephens, Carlisle. 

Prof. William W. Eandis, Carlisle. 

Adjunct Prop. Forrest E. Craver, Carlisle. 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr., Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1912.) 
William D. Boyer, Esq., Scranton. 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

J. Kirk Bosler, Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

Raphael S. Hays, Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1911.) 

Edward M. Biddle, A. B., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1912.) 

Football Manager— Carlton R. Van Hook, '12. 
Assistant— R. Bruce PaTERSON, '13. 
Baseball Manager— Clarence A. Fry, '12. 
Assistant— Earl E. Rahn, '12. 

Manager Outdoor Sports— Norris M. Mumper, '12. 
Manager Indoor Sports— Victor H. Boell, '11. 
Captain Football Team— Euther E. Bashore, '13. 
Captain Baseball Team — D. Albert Henderson, Jr., '12. 
Captain Track Team— John E. FelTon, '12. 
Captain Gymnastic Team— Donald M. Hosie, '13. 
Captain Tennis Team — John H. Hemphill, '12. 

PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIP AND BEINENCIARY PUINDS 

PRIZES. 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improvement in 
composition and declamation at an early stage in the college course, 
the literary societies have each instituted a yearly contest therein for 
their respective members from the Sophomore class. All the members 
of this class in the Belles Eettres society have the option of competing^ 
and a gold medal is awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest de- 
gree of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, as decided 
by judges chosen by the society. 

Awarded to John A. F. Hall, Harrisburg. 

The Frank Beers Memorial Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
Mrs. Nathan T. Beers, New York City, will be awarded to that member 
of the Senior class whose oration, in a public contest on commencement 



76 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

day, shall be deemed second best in composition and delivery. Each 
oration must contain not more than one thousand words, and must be 
left with the President on or before the first Tuesday in May. 
Awarded to "W. Earl Ledden, Glassboro, N. J. 

The Cannon Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henry P. Can- 
non, Esq., of Bridgeville, Del., will be awarded to that member of the 
Sophomore class who shall pass the most satisfactory examination in 
the Mathematics of the Sophomore year, together with the original 
Geometry of the Freshman year. 

Divided between David H. Biddle, Mechanicsburg, and Clinton C. 
Bramble, Centreville, Md. 

The Clemens Prize, the gift of the Rev. Joseph Clemens, A. M., '94, 
Chaplain United States Army, consisting of two prizes of fifteen and 
ten dollars, respectively, will be awarded to the two members of the 
Freshman class who shall excel in the practical or written work of the 
course in Rhetoric for the entire year. 

First prize, W. Moffett Smith, Jamesburg, N. J. Second prize, 
Miriam W. Blair, Carlisle. 

Beginning with the academic year 1910-11, the Clemens Prize, 
twenty-five dollars, will be awarded annually to the student of the 
Junior class, proposing the work of the ministry, who shall write the 
best essay, or sermon, upon some subject bearing upon the work of 
Foreign Missions, the essay or sermon not to exceed 1500 words, and 
to be presented to the President of the College not later than May 1st 
of each year, a copy of the winning essay or sermon, in typewritten 
form, to be forwarded to the donor of the prize. 

The Miller Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles O. Miller, 
Esq., of Stamford, Conn., will be awarded to that member of the Fresh- 
man class who shall excel in forensic declamation. Awarded to B. 
Olcott McAnney, Carlisle. 

The Dare Prize, of twenty dollars, the gift of the College, will be 
awarded to that member of the graduating class of the Conway Hall 
Preparatory school who shall be found to have attained the highest 
excellence in the studies preparatory to any course of Dickinson college. 

Awarded to Samuel h. Mohler, Carlisle. 

The McDaniel Prizes.— Dclaplainc McDaniel, Esq., late of Philadel- 
phia, provided for the founding of certain scholarships, to he awarded 

on the ground of excellence in ■cholarehip. The sum of wv k Phoui un> 

ixm.i.aks was gives the College in trust, with provision that three 

prizes, equal in amount, !>'■ constituted from the annual income, and 
offered yearly to be competed for by the membere of the Freshman and 

Sophomore (lasses, and with provision further, th.it tWO Of these prizes 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 77 

be awarded, one each, to the two members of the former class, and the 
remaining- prize to the member of the latter class who, in such way as the 
authorities of the College prescribe, shall be ascertained to have the 
highest average of excellence in the work of these classes respectively. 

Sophomore class — Divided between Raymond W. Eosey, Blairs- 
town, N. J., and Ernest H. Sellers, Carlisle. 

Freshman class — First prize, divided between William M. Beard, 
Williamsport, Md., and Charles Van Auken, Blairstown, N. J. Second 
prize, divided between Elda R. Park, Ea Park, and W. Moffett Smith, 
Jamesburg, N. J. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes. — These four prizes, of twenty-five 
dollars each, one for each of the college classes, offered by the late 
Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a memorial to his father, General 
John Patton, for many years a faithful friend and trustee of the College, 
will be awarded according to conditions established for the Patton 
Scholarship Prizes maintained for many years by his honored father. 

Senior class — divided between Eydia M. Gooding, Carlisle, and Lil- 
lian K. Wyman, Oxford, N. H. 

Junior class — Forrest E. Adams, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Sophomore class — divided between Helen A. Carruthers, Carlisle, 
and Melinda A. Zang, Hazleton. 

Freshman class — J. Cooper Groome, Carlisle. 

The Wallace Prize, of twenty-five dollars, established 1907, by Prof. 
Samuel B. Wallace, Ped. D., class of '90, Atlanta, Ga., will be awarded 
to the student who shall excel in some phase of English work as deter- 
mined by the Professor of Rhetoric and the English Language. Award- 
ed to A. Marguerite Deatrich, Mt. Pleasant. 

The Pierson Prizes.— These are prizes for oratory established by 
Daniel Pierson, Esq., of Newark, N. J. A gold and silver medal are 
offered each year to be competed for by members of the Junior class in 
a public oratorical contest, which contest has for years been placed 
among the exercises of commencement week. 

Gold Medal— Gordon Arch Williams, Port Matilda. SilvenMedal— 
Howard E. Thompson, Williamstown. 

The Rees Prize.of twenty dollars, the giftof Rev. Milton S. Rees, D. D., 
Rochester, N. Y., will be awarded to that student who shall excel in 
English Bible. 

Awarded to Julia Morgan, Carlisle. 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize, fifty dollars, the gift 
of General James Fowler Rusling, EE. D., Trenton, N. J., of the class 
of '54, will be awarded to that member of the Senior class who, at the 
end of a four years' course, shall be found to excel in scholarship and 
character, as determined by the Faculty. 

Awarded to Clarence G. Shenton, Carlisle. 



78 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Eva fisher Savidge Prize, of forty dollars, the gift of Henry W. 
Savidge, Esq., of Sunbury, Pa., in memory of his wife, Eva Fisher 
Savidge, will be awarded as first prize to that member of the Senior 
class whose oration in a public contest on Commencement day, shall be 
deemed best in composition and delivery. 

Awarded to Frank Steelman, Asbury Park, N. J. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. — As an incentive to improvement 
in composition and declamation at an early stage in the college course, 
the literary societies have each instituted a yearly contest therein for 
their respective members from the Sophomore class. All the members 
of this class in the Union Philosophical society have the option of com- 
peting, and a gold medal is awarded the contestants, exhibiting the 
highest degree of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, 
as decided by judges chosen by the respective societies. 

No contest 1910. 

Traveling Scholarship Prize.— A prize of $250 will be awarded for 
the academic year 1910-11, to that member of the Senior class of the 
College who shall excel in German Language and Literature, the scholar- 
ship to be used as a traveling scholarship for purposes of graduate 
study. The prize is the joint gift of Professors George A. Crider and 
Cornelius W. Prettyman. 

The Walkley Prize.— The gift of W. R. Walkley, D. C. L,., in memoriam 
of hisonlyson, Winfield Davidson Walkley, whodied March 11, 1903. This 
prize will be awarded as a second prize to that member of the Fresh- 
man class who shall excel in declamation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Fenimore S. Johnson, Freehold, N. J. 

The Johnson Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph H. 
Johnson, Esq., of Milton, Pa., class of '05, will be awarded to that one 
of the literary societies of the College the members of which shall 
excel in debate, said debate to be conducted according to the terms 
proposed by the Faculty, and adopted by the respective societies. 

Awarded to the Belles Lettres society, represented by Louis A. 
Tuvin, Frostburg, Md.; James H. Hughes, Jr., Felton, Del.; J. Arthur 
Wright, Coatesville. 

The Smith Prize, of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert Hays Smith, 
Esq., class of '98, of San Francisco, Cal., will be awarded as a second 
prize, to be distributed equally among the membera of the winning 
team in the annual Inter-society debate. 

Awarded to the winners of the Johnson prize. 

The Weber Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Edward Y. 
Weber, E£sq., of New York, will he awarded to that student who shall 

excel in the Civics <>f the Sophomore year. 

Divided between Susan Miller, Reading, and (;. Harold 'Peel, Ship- 
pensburg. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 79 

SPECIAL PRIZES. 

The Department of Oratory. (Not subject, 1909-10, to the regula- 
tions requiring contestants to be members of literary societies). 

The Caldwell Prize, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of James Hope 
Caldwell, '80, of New York City, will be awarded to the male student of 
the department of Oratory, who shall in a public contest excel in decla- 
mation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Earl E. Rahn, Weavertown. 

The Johnson Prize, of fifteen dollars, the gift of Willis Fletcher 
Johnson, L,. H. D., of New York City, will be awarded to the male stu- 
dent who shall stand second in the same contest. 

Awarded to B. Olcott McAnney, Carlisle. 

The McLean Prize, of twenty-five dollars, will be awarded to the fe- 
male student of the department of Oratory, who shall in a public con- 
test excel in declamation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to M. Helen Lehman, Shippensburg. 

The Musser Prize, of fifteen dollars, the gift of Miss Minnesota 
Estelle Musser, of New York City, will be awarded to the female student 
who shall stand second in the same contest. 

Awarded to Anna M. Bacon, Philopolis, Md. 

BENEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumni Loan Fund.— An alumnus of the College, who is deeply 
interested in her welfare, has recently made a contribution of fifty dol- 
lars as an Alumni Loan Fund, with the following purpose: It is pro- 
posed to loan this fund from year to year to students in need of a little 
temporary help — preferably to those well advanced in the college course 
— with the understanding that it be repaid within a year, to be used in 
helping some one else in like need. In this way the money in this fund 
is expected to help new students each year. 

It is a wisely devised plan, and may well encourage other friends 
of the College to make similar helpful use of their means. Even 
small contributions will be gladly received, and added to others, may 
be of inestimable value to struggling young people. 

Not awarded in 1909-10. 

The J. W. f eight Memorial Fund.— The proceeds of this fund— the 
annual interest of one thousand dollars — the gift of J. W. Fisher, Esq., 
of Newport, Tennessee, in loving memory of the character and services 
of the Reverend J. W. Feight, formerly a member of the Central Penn- 
sylvania conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, will be be- 
stowed, subject to the judgment of the President, upon that student or 



80 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

students dependent largely upon his or their own resources, who shall 
have attained high average excellence in the studies of the year in any 
one of the courses offered in the College. In connection with the award, 
the following conditions are observed: First, the student receiving the 
prize shall, if possible, be from within the bounds of the Central Penn- 
sylvania conference. If from any other territory, that of the Baltimore 
conference shall be preferred. Second, the award shall be as far as 
possible in the form of a loan, the same to be returned to the treasurer 
of the fund as soon as possible after the graduation of the student; in- 
terest on the loan to begin two years after the date of graduation. 

Divided between Woodburn J. Sayre and Samuel R. Dout. 

The Mary Louise Huntington Fund.— This fund, the gift of Miss Mary 
Louise Huntington, of Brooklyn, New York, will be used at the discre- 
tion of the President, to aid young men of limited means who are pre- 
paring for missionary, ministerial, or educational work. 

Not awarded in 1909-10. 

The King Scholarship will be awarded, annually, to the graduate of 
the High School, Washington, D. C, who may be selected by the Principal 
for excellence in the studies preparatory to entrance in Dickinson Col- 
lege, the Scholarship to be enjoyed only during the student's Fresh- 
man year. 

Awarded 1909-10 to Hyman N. Levy and H. Munson Corning. 

The A. herr Smith Fund. — The proceeds of this fund (averaging one 
hundred dollars per year), the gift of the late Miss Fliza E. Smith, of 
Lancaster, in memory of her brother, the late Hon. A. Herr Smith, a dis. 
tinguished graduate of the College, and as a part condition of a gift by 
Miss Smith of $10,000, will be bestowed upon that student of the Col. 
lege dependent largely upon his own resources, whom the President may 
deem most worthy of consideration. 

Divided among Ira S. Huber, Karl Kirsch, and Harvey O. Gish. 

The Carlisle high School Scholarship, of forty dollars, the gift of 
the College, will hereafter be awarded at the close of the Freshman 
year to the student from the high school of Carlisle who, on entering* 
shall present a certificate from the principal of the high school, show- 
ing that the bearer on graduation had attained the highest rank in 
scholarship. 

Awarded to Miriam W. Blair. 

The INorristown (Pa.) high School Scholarship, of forty dollars, the 
gift of the College, will hereafter be awarded at tin- close of the I'resh 
man year to the student of the high school of Noi rist o\v n . Pa., who, Otl 

entering, shall present a certificate from the principal of the said high 

school, showing that the bearer on graduation had attained the highest 
rank in schola rship, the scholarship to he gOOd for the Freshman \eai 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 81 

The Bodine Scholarship, of fifty dollars, established 1906, by George 
I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia, through the gift of $1,000, will be 
awarded annually to young men and women whom the President may 
deem most worthy of consideration, or who may be designated by the 
donor of the scholarship. 

Divided between Paul F. Stacy and Ralph F. Stacy. 

The Freeman Scholarship, of fifty dollars, established in 1906, by 
Frank A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia, will be awarded annually, at 
the discretion of the President, to aid young men and women whom he 
may deem most worthy of consideration, or who may be designated by 
the donor of the scholarship. 

Divided between H. Elmore Smith and Howell K. Smith. 

The Lockyer Scholarship, of fifty dollars, established by Mark B. 
Lockyer, Esq., of Philadelphia, will be awarded at the discretion of the 
President, to the student whom he may deem most worthy of the same. 

Awarded to Harry J. Balls. 

The Cornelia A. Thumm fund.— The proceeds of this fund, the an- 
nual interest of nine hundred and fifty dollars, the legacy of Mrs. Cor- 
nelia A. Thumm, late of Philadelphia, will be used at the discretion of 
the President, to aid young men and women, dependent largely upon 
their own resources, whom he may deem most worthy of consideration 

Divided between Edgar H. Rue and Lillian K. Wyman. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship, of fifty dollars, 
established in 1906 by Mrs. Emma E. Keen, of Philadelphia, as a memo- 
rial to her honored father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, through the gift 
of $1,000, will be awarded at the discretion of the President, to assist 
young men preparing for the Christian ministry, whom he may deem 
most worthy of consideration, or who may be designated by the donor 
of the scholarship. 

Awarded to Clarence M. Shepherd. 

The Jackson Scholarships, (two in number), of fifty dollars each, 
established by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jackson, of Berwick, Pa., in memory 
of her husband, the late Col. Clarence Gearhart Jackson, and as part 
condition of a gift of $10,000, will be awarded annually at the close of 
the Freshman year to students of the College who, coming from Wil- 
liamsport Dickinson Seminary, on entering, present certificates from 
the Headmaster of the said Seminary showing that the bearers have 
attained the highest rank in scholarship, the scholarships to be good 
for the Freshman year. 

Awarded to Jeannette Stevens and Ruth Deavor. 

The Wood Scholarship, of fifty dollars, the gift of Miss Wood, of 
Trenton, N. J., will be awarded to the young man or woman whom the 



82 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

President may deem most worthy of consideration, or who may be 
designated by the donor. 

Awarded to Fenimore S. Johnson. 

The Theodore P. Miller Scholarship, of fifty dollars, the gift of Theo- 
dore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia, will be awarded, annually, at the 
discretion of the President, to young men and women dependent largely 
upon their own resources, whom he may deem most worthy of consider- 
ation, or who may be designated by the donor of the scholarship. 

Awarded to Wesley P. Griffiths. 

The Chandler Scholarship, of twenty-five dollars, the gift of D. Harry 
Chandler, Esq., of Vineland, N. J., will be awarded, annually, at the 
discretion of the President, to the young man or woman dependent 
largely upon personal resources, whom he may deem most worthy of 
consideration. 

Awarded to Robert E. Shilling. 

The Scholarship, of one hundred dollars, the gift of 

a lady of New York City, was divided among Floyd B. Hornberger* 
Carl Hartzell, and Ella N. Arntzen. 

Baltimore Medical College Scholarship.— On September 10, 1904, the 
Baltimore Medical College, Baltimore, Md., decided to grant a scholar- 
ship in said college for the use and benefit of Dickinson college, said 
scholarship to be filled each year by a graduate of Dickinson college, 
nominated by the President thereof, and to be available for the ap- 
pointee for the first year of his four years' course in said medical col- 
lege. The holder of the scholarship for the year will be exempted from 
tuition and examination fees, but will be held for matriculation fee, 
laboratory fees, and laboratory deposit, the three items amounting in 
all to twenty-five dollars. 

The Charles T. Schoen Scholarships, ten in number, and each of the 
value of fifty dollars, established by Charles T. Schoen, Esq., of Phila- 
delphia, by his pledge of ten thousand dollars, will be awarded annually 
to young men or women, dependent largely upon their own resources, 
whom the President may deem worthy of consideration or who may be 
designated by the donor. 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, of New 
York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, will be awarded annu- 
ally to the young man or young woman, dependent largely upon his 
or her own resources, whom tlu- President may dorm moat worthy o\ 
consideration! students from New York City and vicinity to have 

prior claim. 

The Samuel B. Coff Temperance Scholarships, three in Dumber, the 

first of lilts dollars, the second of thirty, and the third of twenty, the 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 83 

gift of Samuel B. Goff, Esq., of Camden, N. J., will be awarded during- 
the academic year 1910-11 to the students of the College who shall excel 
in orations, to be publicly delivered, upon some phase of temperance 
work in the United States. 

Note. — The purpose of Mr. Goff is, in the near future, to endow 
a Lectureship in the College, in the sum of five thousand dollars, but 
as the interest available for the present year amounts to but one 
hundred dollars, the oratorical contest will take the place of the 
Lectureship. 

The Scholarship, (contributed), of fifty dollars, the gift 

of a friend of the College, will be awarded, each year, until further 
notice, to the young man or woman of the College whom the President 
may deem worthy of consideration, or who may be designated by the 
donor of the scholarship. 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship, (endowed), of fifty dollars, 
established 1910, by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, through 
the gift of one thousand dollars, will be awarded annually to young 
men or women whom the President may deem worthy of consideration, 
or who may be designated by the donor of the scholarship. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, (endowed in the sum of 
$1,000), the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of John Gillespie, 
Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her father, the interest on 
the endowment to be awarded in each year to a student, or students, of 
the College, dependent quite largely upon their own resources, whom 
the president or faculty may deem most worthy of consideration. 



ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The trustees have authorized the founding of endowed scholarships 
of one Thousand DOivi^ARS Each, whose object is to aid in extending 
the privileges of the College to young men of promise otherwise unable 
to command them. 

Such scholarships may be constituted as follows: 

1. The donor of each scholarship shall have the privilege of naming 
it, and of prescribing the conditions on which it shall be awarded. 

2. Scholarships may be maintained by the annual payment of fifty 
dollars, as interest, until the principal sum of one thousand dollars is 
paid. They lapse, of course, when the interest fails, unless the princi- 
pal or interest on the same has been paid. 

3. Churches contributing one thousand dollars each, may, if they 
desire it, place upon that foundation the sons of their ministers, or in 
alieu of that, may nominate some other candidate to receive its avails. 



84 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

BLANK PORMS fOR WILL BEQUESTS. 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 

the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof shall be sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 
the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and premises, 

that is to say , to have and to 

hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its successors 
and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, or 
knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the Presi- 
dent of the College, Dr. George Edward Reed, Carlisle, Pa., and, if 
practicable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes 
of the testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests de~ 
voted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or the 
endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endowment of a 
scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of the same in the 
will provision. 



School of Law 

OF 

Dickinson College 



THE 



Dickinson School of Law 



of 



Dickinson College 




Founded 1834; Reorganized 1890 



Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
1910-1911 



ESTABLISHMENT OF SCHOOL. 

One of the earliest Schools of Law in the United States was estab- 
lished at Carlisle, in the year 1834, by Hon. John Reed, then President 
Judge of the Courts of Cumberland County, Pa. This school, while 
under his immediate supervision, was regarded as a department of 
Dickinson college, his name appearing as Professor of Law in the 
Faculty of that institution. The College conferred the degree of LL 
B. upon the graduates of the school. After Judge Reed's death, Hon. 
James H. Graham was elected to the Professorship of Law in the Col- 
lege, and gave instruction to such of its students — and others — as de- 
sired to pursue the study of law. With his death, in 1882, the science 
of law ceased to be represented in the courses of the College. 

At the adjourned meeting of the Board of Trustees of the College, 
held in Philadelphia, Thursday, January 9, 1890, the President and Ex- 
ecutive committee were unanimously authorized to re-establish the 
School of Law. 

Application was accordingly made to the Court of Common Pleas 
of Cumberland county, Pa., for a charter, which, on the 10th of Feb- 
ruary, 1890, was granted by that court, through Hon. Charles A. Bar- 
nett, specially presiding. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 89 



INCORPORATORS. 

George Edward Reed, S. T. D., LL. D Carlisle. 

(President of Dickinson college). 
William Trickett, LL. D Carlisle. 

(Dean of Dickinson School of Law). 

Hon. James A. Beaver, LL. D Bellefonte. 

(Judgre of the Superior Court). 
Hon. S. Leslie Mestrezat, LL. D Uniontown. 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court). 

Hon. John P. Elkin Indiana. 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court). 

Hon. John Stewart, LL. D Chambersburg. 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court) . 

Hon. Charles W. Stone Warren. 

Hon. Wilbur P. Sadler Carlisle. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 
Hon. Gustav A. Endlich, LL. D Reading-. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

*Hon. Simon P. Wolverton Sunbury. 

Hon. James W. L/EE Pittsburg-. 

Hon. George B. Orlady, LL. D Huntingdon. 

(Judge of the Superior Court). 

Col. George H. Stewart Shippensburg. 

Hon. John Hays Carlisle. 

Hon. Charles B. Lore, LL. D Wilmington, Del. 

Hon. William U. Hensel, LL. D Lancaster. 

Hon. Charles N. Brumm Pottsville. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Robert McMeen, Esq Mifflintown. 

Hon. Thomas H. Murray Clearfield. 

Hon. William U. Brewer Chambersburg. 

John W. Wetzel, Esq Carlisle. 

Hon. Thaddeus M. Mahon Chambersburg. 

Hon. Edward W. BiddlE Carlisle. 

N. Milton Woods, Esq Lancaster. 

Hon. Moses A. Points Bedford. 

Hon. Walter S. Lyon Pittsburg. 

*Hon. Samuel R. PealE Lock Haven. 

Hon. Lucien W. Doty Greensburg. 

(judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Hon. John W. Bittinger York. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Hon. Samuel McC. Swope Gettysburg. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 
*Hon. Martin Bell Hollidaysburg. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 



*Deceased. 



90 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Hon. Clinton R. Savidge Sunbury. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

*William C. Allison, ESQ Philadelphia. 

Hon. John W. Reed Brookville. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

John L,. Shelly, Esq Mechanicsburg. 

Hon. Robert W. Archbai/d, EE. D Scranton. 

(Judg-e of United States District Court). 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq Carlisle. 

William D. Boyer, Esq Scranton. 

Hon. John P. Kelly Scranton. 

Hon. W. P. Bay Stewart York. 

Lewis S. Sadler, Esq Carlisle. 

Samuel W. Kirk, Esq McConnelsburg. 

Sylvester B. Sadler, Esq Carlisle. 

Millard F. Thompson, Esq Carlisle. 

Hon. Charles B. Staples Stroudsburg. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Hon. James W. Shull New Bloomfield. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

William A. Jordan, Esq Pittsburg-. 

Hon. Lyman D. Gilbert Harrisburg. 

Walter K. Sharpe, Esq Chambersburg. 

Hon. GEORGE Kunkel Harrisburg. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Hon. Joseph W. Bouton Smethport. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Isaac McCurlEy, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Harry H. Mercer, Esq Mechauicsburg. 

Hon. Henry A. Fuller Wilkes-Barre. 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas). 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq Philadelphia. 

J. Banks Kurtz, Esq Altoona. 

A. A. Stevens, Esq Tyrone. 

OfNCERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

President — George E&DWARD RSBD. 

Treasurer — Wii.ua m TRICK kit. 

Secretary -RICHARD W, Woods. 

Executive Committee— Gborgb Edward Rebd, John h ws, Wiuuk 

l'\ S \ Di, KK. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 91 

PACULTY. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, S. T. D., EL. D., 

President. 

WIEEIAM TRICKETT, EE. D., 
Dean, and Professor of the Law of Beat Estate. 

The Honorable WIEBUR FISK SADEER, A. M., 

President Judge, Ninth Judicial District, 

Professor of Practice. 

SYEVESTER BAKER SADEER, A. M., EE. B., 

Professor of Criminal Law. 

A. J. WHITE HUTTON, A. M., EE. B., 

Professor of Law of Decedents 1 Estates and Partnership. 

JOSEPH PARKER McKEEHAN, A. M., EE. B., 

Professor of Law of Contracts and Torts. 

FRANCIS BENJAMIN SEEEERS, Jr., A. M., EE. B., 

Professor of Practice. 

WAETER HARRISON HITCHEER, B. E., 
Professor of Equity. 



92 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY TME SCHOOL OP LAW,UNDER 

AUTHORIZATION OP ThE BOARD OP TRUSTEES 

OP THE COLLEGE. 

JUNE 8, 1910. 



Legum Baccalaureus. 



Benjamin John H. Branch, 
William Elmer Brown, 
Oliver Herman Bruce, 
James ViNCENt Butler, 
Selden Spencer Case, 
Eugene Gabriel Cohen, 
Thomas Benjamin Couiek, 
John Wiley Day, 
Edgar Easter, 
Chester Daniel Fetterhoof, 
Noah H. Frantz, 
Thomas Jefferson Grovkk, 

William 



Charles E. Hauer, 
Joseph Burnell Jenkins, 
Charles Alvin Jones, 
John Mervin Kinard, 
Horace Brown King, 
Walter John McClintock, 
Russell Charles Mauch, 
George J. A. Miller, 
Phil Shive Moyer, 
Louis Silverman, 
John Peter Wanner, 
Hugh B. Woodward, 
A. SSerby. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 93 

COURSE OP INSTRUCTION. 

PIRST, OR JUNIOR YEAR. 

Criminal Law.— Walter H. Hitchler. First term, three hours per 

week. Clark's Criminal Law; Stephen's History of the Criminal 

Law; Beale's Cases on Criminal Law. 
Real Property.— William Trickett. Both terms, two hours per week. 

Minor and Wurts on Real Property; Gray's Cases; Finch's Cases. 
Torts.— Joseph P. McKeehan. First term and half of second term, 

three hours per week. Burdick on Torts; Ames' and Smith's 

Cases; Selected Pennsylvania Cases. 
Contracts. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Both terms, two hours per week. 

Clark on Contracts; Huffcutt and Woodruff's Cases. 
Domestic Relations. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, three 

hours per week. Long's Domestic Relations; Selected Pennsyl- 
vania Cases. 
Bailments.— Walter H. Hitchler. Second term, three hours per week. 

Hale on Bailments; Goddard's Cases on Bailments; McClain's or 

Beale's Cases on Carriers. 
Moot Court. — Four times per week throughout the year. 

SECOND, OR MIDDLE YEAR. 

Equity. — Walter H. Hitchler. First term and part of second term, 

four hours per week. Bispham's Equity with Cases; Ames' 

Cases. 
Agency. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, three hours per week. 

Huffcutt on Agency; Huffcutt's Cases. 
Pleading. — Walter H. Hitchler. Latter part of second term, two 

hours per week. Martin's Common Law Pleading. 
Decedents' Estates. — A. J. White Hutton. Both terms, three hours 

per week. Croswell's Executors. 
Sales of Personal Property. — Joseph P. McKeehan. First term, 

three hours per week. Tiffany on Sales; Selected Cases on Sales. 
Evidence. — William Trickett. Both terms, two hours per week. Green- 
leaf's Evidence; Selected Pennsylvania Cases; Wigmore's Cases. 
General Jurisprudence. — William Trickett. Second term, three 

hours per week. Holland; Markby. 
Damages. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, two hours per week, 

Sedgwick on Damages ; Beale's Cases on Damages. 
Blackstone. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Seeond half of term, three hours 

per week. 
Practice. — Francis B. Sellers, Jr. Both terms, two hours per week. 
Moot Court. — Four times per week throughout the year. 



94 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

THIRD, OR SENIOR YEAR. 

Corporations.— William Trickett. First and part of second term, three 
hours per week. Clark on Corporations ; Wilgus's Cases on Cor- 
porations. 

Constitutional Law. — William Trickett. First term, two hours per 
week. Cooley's Constitutional Law; McClain's Cases on Consti- 
tutional Law. 

Constitution of Pennsylvania.— William Trickett. Second term, 
two hours per week for eight weeks. 

Bills and Notes.— William Trickett. Second term, two hours per 
week. Ogden on Negotiable Instruments; Pennsylvania Cases. 

Partnership. — A. J. White Hutton. First term, two hours per week. 
George on Partnership; Ames' Cases on Partnership. 

Insurance. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, two hours per week 
for eight weeks. Richards on Insurance. 

Quasi-ContractS.— A. J. White Hutton, First term, two hours per 
week. Keener on Quasi-Contracts; Keener's Cases on Quasi- 
Contracts. 

Bankruptcy. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, six weeks, two hours 
per week. Williston's Cases. 

Patents. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, six weeks, two hours 
per week. 

International Law.— William Trickett. Both terms, one hour per 
week. 

Practice.— Francis B. Sellers, Jr. Both terms, two hours per week. 

Landlord and Tenant.— A. J. White Hutton. Second term, two hours 
per week for eight weeks. 

Moot Court. — Both terms, four times per week. 

METHODS Or INSTRUCTION. 

Text-books have not been abandoned. The work of Blackstone, 
Story, Kent, Pollock, Anson, Lindley, Best, Cooley, and of competent 
authors who have written more especially for students, is not believed 
to be useless. On the contrary, the careful study of their treatises is pre, 
scribed. Nor is the study of cases neglected. Their assiduous perusal is 
constantly required. Caeea apposite to the various topics are called to the 

notice of the student, who is expected carefully to study them and show 
the results of his investigation in the class room. The frequent moot 

courts require the same examination and comparison of cases that the 

lawyer finds necessary. 

Cases arc no1 discarded, because the opinion! of the judges take 

paint explicitly to state the principles on which their judgment! are 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 95 

founded. The best opinions of the greatest judges do this — witness 
Gray's Cases on Property, or any other good selection — but it is felt 
that to forbid their use by students, lest the latter, finding the principles 
distinctly announced by the writers of the opinions, should neglect to 
induct them for themselves, would be too heavy a sacrifice to make to a 
theory of legal education founded largely on a misconception of the 
nature of the inductive method. 

In most of the departments, a portion of the text-book is assigned 
for reading and reflection, together with cases which support, qualify 
and explain its propositions. When the students meet they are exam- 
ined on the topics embraced in the lesson. Their comprehension of the 
principles of the text is tested. Obscurities are cleared up. The facts 
and law of the cases are considered. Students are above all trained to 
think. 

Practice is emphasized. The actions at common law are taken up 
and studied seriatim, their functions explained, the procedure in each 
described and illustrated step by step. Papers used in actual causes 
are, as far as possible, employed for models and illustrations. Thus the 
diligent student acquires before graduation a thorough comprehension 
of the actions of assumpsit, replevin, trespass, ejectment, partition, 
dower, etc., and is able to institute and conduct them through all the 
stages to execution. Similar instruction is imparted with respect to 
bills in equity, and the proceedings in the Orphans' Court, the Court of 
Quarter Sessions and of Oyer and Terminer, and before justices of the 
peace. An aim of the course is to put in the power of a student the ac- 
quisition not of the theory of the law merely, but of the knowledge of 
practice, such as is not attained by any other method. 

Students, through the courtesy of the officers, are made familiar 
with the offices of the court, and the various records kept in them. 

OFFICES AIND MOOT COURTS. 

Offices are maintained in the school, corresponding with those of 
Justices of the Peace, the Prothonotary, the Register of Wills, the Clerk 
of the Orphans' Court, the Clerk of the Criminal Courts, and the Re- 
corder of Deeds. 

Students are appointed from time to time to fill these offices. The 
officers thus appointed maintain the customary books of record, making- 
all appropriate entries. Praecipes are filed, writs of summons made and 
served, declarations and pleas are entered and causes put at issue. The 
decisions in Moot Courts are permanently filed in these offices. In the 
same way the work of the Register of Wills is exactly reproduced in the 
Probate of Wills, the grant of Letters of Administration, and in the 
passing of the accounts of Executors and Administrators. 



96 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Moot Courts are held several times each week, in which a professor 
sits as Judge, and students deputed to represent the respective sides 
present their points and arguments. Each student during- the first and 
second years participates in a case at least once every month, and dur- 
ing the third year more frequently. Actions are instituted by the stu- 
dents, and conducted through all the stages of pleading down to judg- 
ment and execution. In a word, the harmonious blending of theory 
and practice is in all cases persistently sought. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

ADMISSION OP STUDENTS. 

Applications for admission must be made to William Trickett, Dean. 

Candidates for admission to the school will be received (1) on the 
presentation of the diploma of a college, or of a more advanced public 
high school, normal school, seminary or academy, whose course em- 
braces the studies required by the Rule of the Supreme Court for regis- 
tration as a student of law (See below, "Registration in Pennsyl- 
vania."); (2) on the presentation of a certificate showing that the ap- 
plicant has successfully passed the Supreme Court preliminary exam- 
ination, and (3) on examination. Satisfactory evidence of the grade 
of the school, seminary or academy from which the student comes, and 
of its curriculum, must, if necessary, be furnished. If the applicant 
has no diploma of the institutions named, it will be necessary for him 
to undergo an examination upon the studies prescribed for registration 
by the Supreme Court. 

REGISTRATION IN PENNSYLVANIA. 

The following are the studies prescribed by the State Board of Law 
Examiners, for applicants for registration as students of law: 
ENGLISH. 

1. No candidate will be accepted in English whose work on any 
subject is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, idiom, or 
division into paragraphs. 

2. A short essay will be required to be written on a subject to be 
announced at the examination. 

3. The applicant must have read the following works, and must 
be able to pass a satisfactory examination upon the subject-matter, 
the style and structure thereof, and to answer simple questions 

on the livesof the authors. Shakeapei ne's Hamlet and Merchant qf 

\'rni<r, The Sir Roger <l< < V >rc rl< i/ Popart in the S/n c/ufor, Scott's 
I hurl 0(f Mi<l- fjof/iian, Thackeray's llrnri/ /-Jsiimml ', tirst three 

books of Milton's Paradise Lott, Longfellow's Evangeline! Borke'i 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 97 

Speech on Conciliation with America, Burke's Letter to the Sheriff's 
of Bristol, Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Cooper's Last of 
the Mohicans, Webster's Reply to Hayne, Hawthorne's Marble Faun. 
4. The applicant must also have such knowledge of the general 
history of English literature (including that of the United States) 
as can be obtained from a good standard text-book upon this sub- 
ject. 

HISTORY. 

1. Outlines of Universal History. 

Myers' Ancient History, and Myers' Mediaeval and Modern His- 
tory or other equivalent works are recommended to those students 
who have not had the advantage of advanced academic instruction. 

2. English History. 

With special reference to social and political development. Stu- 
dents who have not had the advantage of advanced academic in- 
struction should make a careful study of Montgomery's Leading 
Facts or English History, or Ran some's Short History of England, 
or Higginson and Channing's English History for Americans, or 
some other equivalent work; and all applicants are expected to read 
Green's Short History of the English People. 

3. American History. 

This will include Colonial history with a view to the origin and 
early development of our institutions; the story of the Revolution 
and of the formation and adoption of the Federal Constitution ; and 
the political and social history of the United States, down to the 
present time. 

Students who have not had the advantage of advanced academic 
instruction should carefully study Channing's Student's History of 
the United States, or Johnstone's History of the United States for 
Schools, or Thomas' History of the United States, or some other 
equivalent work; and all applicants for examination are expected 
to read: A good general history of the United States, Pisk's Dutch 
and Quaker Colonies in America, Parkman's Montcalm and Wolfe, 
Fiske's The Critical Period of American History. 

LATIN. 

(A) First four books of Cozsa^s Commentaries. 

(B) First six books of Vergil's JEneid. 

(C) First four Orations of Cicero against Catiline. 

This examination will include a general knowledge, of the subject- 
matter, history, geography and mythology of A and B; sight trans- 
lations from the above works and sight translations taken at large 



98 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

from Vergil and Cicero adapted to the proficiency of those who have 
studied the prescribed works. 

The student will also be required to render into Latin a short pas- 
sage of English based on the first book of Ccesar's Commentaries. 
MATHEMATICS. 

Arithmetic. — A thorough practical knowledge of ordinary arith- 
metic. A careful training in accurate computation with whole 
numbers and fractions should form an important part of this work. 

Algebra. — Through quadratics. 

Geometry. — The whole of Plane Geometry as included in Went- 
worth's Geometry or any other standard text-book. 
MODERN GEOGRAPHY. 

The student will be expected to have an accurate knowledge of 
the political and physical geography of the United States and such 
a knowledge of the political and physical geography of the rest of 
the earth as can be obtained from a careful study of the ordinary 
text-books of the schools. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Besides the scrutiny to which the student submits in the daily reci- 
tation, he is subjected at certain stages in the study of a subject to an 
examination covering the field traversed. The examination is oral or 
written— or both, according to the subject-matter. The examinations, 
together with punctuality and industry in the discharge of the daily 
work of the school, are of decisive effect upon graduation. 

MATERIAL EQUIPMENT. 

The building in which the school is held is devoted to no other uses. 
Heated by steam, well lighted and ventilated, and by the liberality of 
the late William C. Allison, Esq., of Philadelphia, put in thorough re- 
pair, it is well adapted to its purposes. 

officers or tme alumni association. 

President— Frank C. Bosler, Esq. 
Vice-President — Robert W. Irving, Esq. 
Secretary— John M. Rhey, Esq. 
Treasurer — Jerry Omwake, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

LIBRARY. 

The library of the school is well adapted to the needs of the student 
Already large, it is yearly growing. It is in a Commodious, well lighted 
and heated room with ample table accommodations. Hut very few law- 
yers in the State have ready access to so large and well selected a iiiuii- 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 99 

ber of text-books and decisions. A few years ago a generous gift from 
the late Mrs. Mary Cooper Allison, of Philadelphia, made it possible to 
double the then existing collection, and it has since been largely in- 
creased. The library is open daily from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. No fee is 
charged for the use of it. 

Besides the L,aw library, the students of the school are allowed to 
have the use of the books found in the rich collections of the College, 
on compliance with the usual conditions. 

THE SITE OP THE SCHOOL. 

Carlisle, situated in the beautiful and salubrious Cumberland Val- 
ley, seventeen miles from Harrisburg, is but three hours from Philadel- 
phia and Baltimore, four from Washington, and six from New York. 

SPECIAL PRIVILEGES. 

The college libraries, lectures, athletic field, gymnasium, boarding 
clubs, and dormitories are accessible to the students of the L,aw School. 
They are allowed also to pursue special studies in the College, e. g., 
Ivatin, German, History, Political Economy. Particular advantages are 
offered them for learning the principles of, and gaining practice in, 
oratory. Instruction in this department is under the immediate direc- 
tion of the President. The work to be done will comprehend all mat- 
ters pertaining to the Art of Public Discourse. 

COURT PRIVILEGES. 

The court privileges are unusual. For nine weeks of the school 
year jury trials are held, and many argument courts in the intervals. 
Students are assigned seats, from which they can easily see, hear, and 
note what transpires. The offices are open to their examination. Spe- 
cial preparation upon the cases before trial makes the actual watching 
of their evolution before the court and jury much more serviceable 
than it could otherwise be. 

DEGREES. 

Students satisfactorily completing the prescribed course will re- 
ceive the degree of LL. B. 

By act of the Board of Trustees of Dickinson College in June, 1896, 
graduates of reputable colleges who shall complete in a satisfactory 
manner the course of the School of Law may have conferred on them, 
by the authority of the said Board, the degree of Master of Arts in 
eursu. Recipients of the degree will be charged the usual diploma fee 
of five dollars. 



100 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



EXPENSES. 



For tuition during- the short term the charge is $40, and during the 
long term $55. These must be paid at the opening of the term. The 
names of those who are in default may be dropped from the rolls at any 
time. For the final examination and diploma $10 will also be charged. 

Rooms may be had in the College at reasonable rates, varying with 
their situation and desirableness, or may be found in the town. Board- 
ing in the college clubs costs from $2.75 to $3.50 per week, and in fami- 
lies of the town from $3.00 to $3.50. The total expenses of a student for 
tuition, boarding and lodging need not exceed $260 per year. 



T\ TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The school year is divided into two terms, the first commencing on 
the last Wednesday of September, and the second on the first Wednes- 
day following January 1st. The first session terminates with the Win- 
ter vacation, which begins three days before Christmas. The second 
session ends with the Commencement of Dickinson college, i. e., on 
Wednesday, June 7. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR. 

RULE OP TME SUPREME COURT. 

Rule I. No person shall be admitted to practice as an attorney in 
this Court except upon the recommendation of the State Board of Law 
Examiners. 

Rule II. Any applicant for admission to the Bar of this Court, who 
is now in good and regular standing at the Bar of a Court of Common 
Pleas of this Commonwealth, and after he shall have practiced therein 
for at least two years, may be admitted, without examination, upon the 
certificate of the State Board of Law Examiners that he is eligible for 
admission under the provisions of the rules of this Court heretofore in 
force, and no such candidate shall be required to advertise or pay any 
fee for reporting upon his credentials; but this rule shall not apply to 
graduates of law schools who shall have been admitted to a Court of 
Common Pleas upon their diplomas, unless they shall have practiced at 
least two years in some one of the Courts of this Commonwealth. 

Rule III. Any student who, on or prior to this date, has begun the 
study of the law, under the rules governing admissions to the Bar oi 
the judicial district within which he resides, may apply to the State 
Board of I y aw Examiners for examination and admission to tin- Bar of 
this Court, at such date as he would have boon entitled to apply f6l aoV 
mission in Mich judicial district, and the certificate of the Hoard of Ex- 
aminers shall be conclusive evidenee of his eligibility for admission to 
the Bar of this Court upon examination. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 101 

Rule IV. No person shall be registered as a student at law for the 
purpose of becoming entitled to admission to the Bar of the Supreme 
Court until he shall have satisfied the State Board of L,aw Examiners 
that he is of good moral character, and shall have passed a preliminary 
examination upon the following subjects: 1. English language and lit- 
erature; 2. Outlines of universal history; 3. History of England and of 
the United States; 4. Arithmetic, algebra through quadratics, and plane 
geometry; 5. Modern geography; 6. The first six books of Cassar's 
Commentaries, the first six books of the ^neid, and the first four 
orations of Cicero against Catiline. 

Every such candidate shall pay the State Board a fee of $10, and, 
upon receiving a certificate recommending his registration and certify- 
ing that he is qualified to begin the study of the law, shall cause his 
name, age, place of residence, and the name of his preceptor, or the law 
school in which he proposes to pursue his studies, to be registered with 
the Prothonotary of the Eastern District. 

Rule V. Candidates for admission, who have spent at least three 
years after registration in the study of the law, either by attendance 
upon the regular course of a law school, offering at least a three years' 
course, eight months in the year, and an average of ten hours per week 
each year, or partly in a law school and partly in the office of a practic- 
ing attorney, or by the bona fide service of a regular clerkship in the 
office of a practicing attorney, shall be eligible to appear for examina- 
tion for admission to the bar of this Court upon complying with the 
following requirements: 

1. A candidate must advertise his intention to apply for admission 
in a law periodical or a newspaper designated by the Board, and pub- 
lished within the judicial district within which he shall have pursued 
his studies and in the Iyegal Intelligencer, once a week for four weeks 
immediately preceding his appearance before the Board. 

2. He must file the necessary credentials with the Board in such 
form as shall be prescribed at least twenty-one days before the date 
of examination, and shall pay the Board a fee of $20. 

3. He must file a certificate signed by at least three members of 
the Bar in good standing in the judicial district in which he has resided 
or intends to practice, that he is personally known to them, and that 
they believe him to be of good moral character. 

4. A certificate from the dean of the law school or preceptor that 
he has been regular in attendance and pursued the study of the law 
with diligence from the time of registration. 

Rule VI. Every applicant for admission must sustain a satisfac- 
tory examination in Blackstone'S Commentaries, constitutional law, 
including the constitutions of the United States and Pennsylvania, 



102 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

equity, the law of real and personal property, evidence, decedents' es- 
tates, landlord and tenant, contracts, partnership, corporations, crimes, 
torts, domestic relations, common law pleading- and practice, Pennsyl- 
vania practice, the Federal statutes relating- to the judiciary and to 
bankruptcy, Pennsylvania statutes and decisions and the rules of court. 

Rule VII. Examinations for registration and admission to the Bar 
shall be conducted in writing, and shall be held simultaneously, after 
due notice, twice a year, in the cities of Philadelphia, Harrisburg, 
Pittsburg, Williamsport, and Wilkes-Barre. 

Rule VIII. The State Board of L,aw Examiners shall hold office 
during the pleasure of the Court for a term not exceeding five years, 
except that of the members of the Board now appointed one shall with- 
draw at the end of each year, such withdrawals to be made in the order 
of seniority of admission to the Bar. The members of the Board shall 
serve without compensation, but shall be reimbursed their traveling 
and other expenses. The Board may, with the approval of the Court, 
appoint assistants to aid in securing compliance with the conditions 
preliminary to registration and examination, to superintend the con- 
duct of the candidates and to make a preliminary report upon the an- 
swers of the candidates; but the members of the Board shall be respon- 
sible to the Court for the enforcement of these rules, and the proper 
ascertainment of the results of these examinations, and no student 
shall be rejected except by a majority of the State Board of Law Ex- 
aminers. The Board shall also have the power to appoint a Secretary 
and Treasurer, or the same person may hold both offices, and they may 
pay to each assistant examiner, and to the Secretary and Treasurer, 
out of the fees received, and after deduction of the necessary expenses, 
a reasonable compensation. 

Rule IX. It shall be the duty of the State Board of L,aw Exam- 
iners to prepare a paper for gratuitous distribution among intending 
applicants for registration or admission, containing detailed informa- 
tion as to the subjects of examination. 

RULES OP COURTS OF CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Rule 50. The Court shall annually, in January of each year, appoint 
a board of examiners, consisting of seven members of the Bar, whose 
duty it shall be to examine applicants for registration as students of law, 
and also applicants for admission to practice as attorneys in the several 
courts of this county, except in cases hereinafter provided. 

Rule 51. No person, except as hereinafter provided, shall be ad- 
mitted to practice law in the Courts of Common IMeas, Quarter Sessions 

of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer and Orphans' Court of thia county. 

until he or she shall have passed the examination provided hy the State 

Board of Law E&xaminers. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 103 

Rule 52. No person shall hereafter be admitted to practice as an 
attorney in these courts except upon the following- conditions: 

a. He shall be a citizen of the United States of full age. 

b. He shall satisfy the Court when he applies for admission that he 
is a person of integrity and good behavior. 

c. He shall file at the same time with the Board of Examiners, 
proof that he has given notice, by advertisement for three weeks in a 
newspaper published in the county of Cumberland, of his intention to 
make application for admission as an attorney, and of the time of such 
intended application. 

d. He shall also file, at the same time, a certificate of the State 
Board of Law Examiners, that he has successfully passed their prelimi- 
nary and final examinations. 

Rule 53. The board of examiners in cases where the applicant pre- 
sents certificate from the State Board of Law Examiners that he or she 
has successfully passed their preliminary and final examinations, may 
recommend his or her admission to the Bar without further inquiry into 
his or her knowledge of the law. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

But few rules are prescribed. Students are expected to maintain a 
g-ood moral character and a gentlemanly deportment, to exhibit dili- 
gence in work and to indulge in no conversation in the Library. 
While attendance at the college prayers is not compulsory, it is strongly 
advised, as is participation in stated public worship in the churches 
of the town. Students must not leave Carlisle during the term without 
permission from the Dean; nor absent themselves from lectures or 
recitations without good cause, which must be explained to and ap- 
proved by the Dean and Professor in whose department the absence 
occurs. 

All damages to property on the part of the students will be covered 
by pro rata assessments. 



Conway Hall 

Collegiate Preparatory 

School 



Conway Hall 



Collegiate Preparatory 
School 

of 

Dickinson College 

1910-11 




CARLISLE, PA. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR— 1910 -1911. 



PALL TERM— 1910. 



Sept. 


13, Tuesday. 


Sept. 


24, Saturday. 


Oct. 


29, Saturday. 


Oct. 


31-Nov. 6. 


Nov. 


24, Thursday. 


Dec. 


10, Saturday. 


Dec. 


21, Wednesday. 




WINTER 


Jan. 


4, Wednesday. 


Jan. 


26, Thursday. 


Feb. 


11, Saturday. 


Feb. 


22, Wednesday. 


Feb. 


24, Friday. 



Mar. 17, Friday, 12:30 P. M. 



Fall Term begins. 
Y. M. C. A. Reception. 
Faculty Reception. 
Week of Prayer. 
Thanksgiving - . 
Reception to Athletes. 
Fall Term ends. 

TERM— 1911. 

Winter Term begins. 

Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Lincoln's Birthday Celebration. 

Washington's Birthday Celebration . 

Mid-Winter Reception. 

Winter Term closes. 



SPRING TERM-I9II. 



Mar. 


28, Tuesday, 8:15 A. M. 


Spring Term begins. 


May 


5, Friday. 


Inter-Society Debate. 


May 


13, Saturday. 


Inter-Scholastic Track Meet. 


May 


25-30. 


Final Examinations. 


May 


28, Sunday. 


Discourse before Graduates. 


May 


28, Sunday, 6 P. M. 


Campus Vespers. 


May 


29, Monday. 


Annual Entertainment. 


May 


30, Tuesday, 8. P. M. 


Reception in honor, Class 1911 


May 


31, Wednesday, 2 P. M. 


Class Day. 


May 


31, Wednesday, 8 P. M. 


Commencement Exercises. 






HISTORICAL NOTE. 

The Collegiate Preparatory school — known for nearly a century as 
the "Grammar School" — was founded in 1783, in connection with Dick- 
inson college, and as its special preparatory school. It did its assigned 
duty throughout the first half-century of the life of the College, and 
when, in 1833, the latter was reorganized, under the auspices of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, the school was retained as a part of the reor- 
ganized institution. In 1869 it was discontinued, with the expectation 
that the various seminaries of the country would furnish a sufficient 
number of students. The result did not justify the change, and in 1877 
the Trustees instructed the faculty to reorganize it. The school is not 
an organic part of the College, but is under the immediate supervison 
of the President of the College and the Executive committee. Its suc- 
cess since its reorganization has been marked. There has been a con- 
stantly increasing attendance from year to year, necessitating a corre- 
spondingly enlarged Faculty, and the material equipment of the school 
also has been undergoing constant enlargement and improvement. 

In 1884, upon the completion of the Jacob Tome Scientific Building, 
and the consequent removal of the Scientific Department to its new 
quarters, South college was set apart for the uses of the Collegiate Pre- 
paratory school. 

In 1901, South college having been found to be inadequate for the 
accommodation of the School, the Trustees of the College authorized the 
erection of the elegant and commodious structure in which it is now 
housed, and which is described later on. 

In 1904, through the generosity of the Hon. Andrew Carnegie, who 
came to the relief of the College in an hour of financial emergency with 
a gift of sixty-three thousand four hundred and eighty dollars, the new 
building was completed, thoroughly equipped, and its facilities in- 
creased by the construction of a large annex for kitchen and laundry 
purposes. 

At the request of Mr. Carnegie, and as a tribute to his friend, 
Moncure Daniel Conway, Li. H. D., of the class of '49, the building was 
designated "Conway Hall," by which designation it is now known. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OP THE BOARD 
OP TRUSTEES. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, S. T. D., LL. D Carlisle. 

JOHN P. MEUCK, Esq Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE Carlisle. 

JOHN S. BURSK, Esq Carlisle. 

Rev. CHAREES W. STRAW, D. D Philadelphia. 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, Jr., Esq Carlisle. 

JOHN S. BURSK Carlisle. 

Treasurer. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 111 



FACULTY. 

PRESIDENT. 

GEORGE EDWARD REED, S. T. D., LL. D. 

HEADMASTER. 

WILLIAM ALBERT HUTCHISON, A. M., Ped. D. 
Mathematics. 

MASTERS. 

CHARLES LOWE SWIFT, A. M., 

English. 

JOHN HENRY SUPER, Jr. A. B., 

Latin and French. 

JAMES HUGH McKEE, Ph. B., 

German. 

CLARENCE GEORGE SHENTON, A. B., 
Greek and Latin. 

WEBSTER STRAYER BLADES, A. B., 

Mathematics and Science. 

JOHN SCOTT CLELAND, A. M., 

History and English. 

THOMAS ELLISON ARNOLD, B. S., 

Mathematics and Science. 

LUTHER E. BASHORE, 
Assistant, Commercial Department. 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A. M., 
Director of Physical Training. 



CHARLES O'BRIEN, 
Football Coach. 

WEBSTER S. BLADES, A. B., 
Assistant Coach. 



MAUDE ESTELLE WILSON, 

Secretary to Headmaster. 

MRS. MARY J. LEAS, 

Matron. 



112 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



DIPLOMAS CONfERRED BY THE SCHOOL 

JUNE I, 1910. 



Barnitz, George W., 
Bastress, Edgar R., 
Becker, Fred. C, 
Brinton, Thomas B., 
Carruthers, Donald W., 
Church, Herbert T., 
Dondero, Peter L-, 
Karper, Leslie M., 
Killough, Thomas L., 



Kuller, Franklin A., 
Leach, E. Clements, 
Mohler, Fred. L., 
Mohler, Samuel L., 
Morgan, Margaret H. 
Noel, William A., 
Paul, John H., 
Rockwell, Emory B., 
Shepler, William H., 
Stickell, Ira G. 



COMMEINCEMEINT MOINORS. 



CLASS 1910. 

Tor Excellence in Scholarship. 

Samuel L. Mohler, Valedictorian, 
Margaret H. Morgan, Salutatorian, 
Franklin A. Kuller, 
Fred. L. Mohler, 
Ira G. Stickell. 

for Excellence in Department of English. 
BJ. Clementi Leach. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 113 

COURSES OP STUDY. 
CLASSICAL COURSE. 

PIRST PORM. 

English. — English Grammar (Buehler). English Composition 
(Lock wood and Emerson). Easy Classics. Spelling - . 

History. — Roman History (Myers). Grecian History (Myers). 
Latin. — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniel). 
Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Durell and Robbins). Reviewed. 

SECOND PORM. 

English. — English Composition (Lockwood and Emerson). Easy 
Classics. Spelling-. 

Greek. — First Greek Book (White). 

Latin.— Second ' Year Latin (Allen and Greenoug-h) or Ccesar 
(Walker). Latin Prose (Bennett). 

Mathematics.— Algebra (Wells). 

THIRD PORM. 

English. — Composition. Critical study of the English classics 
prescribed by the College Association of the Middle States and Mary- 
land. Reading Course. Elementary Composition Rhetoric (Scott and 
Denny). Study of Words (Buehler). Word- Building (Kellogg and Reed) 

Greek. — Anabasis (Goodwin). Greek Composition. 

History. — United States History (McLaughlin). (Second half-year). 

Latin. — Cicero (Allen and Greenough). Latin Prose Composition 
(Jones). Reading at sight. 

Mathematics.— A Igebra (Wells). (First half-year). 

POURTM PORM. 

English. — Composition. Critical study of the English classics 
prescribed by the College Association of the Middle States and Mary- 
land. Study of the English Sentence (Kimball). Reading Course. Com- 
position Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). Declamations and Orations. 

Greek. — The Iliad (Seymour). Greek Composition. Reading at 
sight. 

Latin.— Vergil (Walker) . 

Mathematics. — Geometry. Algebra reviewed. 



114 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LATIN-SCIENTIflC COURSE. 

PIRST FORM. 

English. — English Grammar (Buehler). English Composition 
(Mother Tongue, Book 2). Easy Classics. Spelling-. 

History.— Roman History (Myers). Grecian History (Myers). 
Latin. — First Year Latin (Collar and Daniel). 
Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Durell and Robbins). Reviewed. 

SECOND FORM. 

English.— English Composition and Rhetoric (L,ockwood and Emer- 
son). Easy Classics. Spelling-. 

Eatin.— Second Year Latin (Allen and Greenough) or Ccesar 
(Walker). Latin Prose Composition (Bennett). 

Mathematics.— A Igebra (Wells). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Fairbanks). 

THIRD FORM. 

English. — Composition. Critical study of the works of authors 
prescribed for college entrance requirements. 

Elementary Composition Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). Study of 
Words (Buehler). Word-Building (Kellogg and Reed). 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). Readings — easy selec- 
tions; or, 

German. — Grammar ( Vos's-Essentials). Readings — easy selections. 

History. — United States History (McLaughlin). (Second half-year). 

Eatin. — Cicero (Allen and Greenough). Latin Prose Composition 
(Bennett). Reading at sight. 

Mathematics. — Algebra (Wells). (First half-year). 

FOURTH FORM. 

English. — Composition. Critical study of the works of authors 
prescribed for college entrance requirements. Study of the English 
Sentence (Kimball). Reading Course. Composition Rhetoric (Scott and 
Denny). Declamations and Orations. 

Gkkman or French continued. 

*Hibtory. English History (Montgomery). (First half-year). 
Mediasval and Modern (Myers). (Second half-year). 

Latin.— Vergil (Greenough and Kittredge). 

Mathematics. Oeonn try (Robbins). Algebra (Wells). Reviewed. 

'Options! I'" ftudi Hi' pi. p , iij i. .1 tin i'i mi' \ i \ .im.i preliminary Law < xaminationi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 115 



SCIEINTIPIC COURSE. 

FIRST FORM. 

English. — English Grammar (Buehler). English Composition 
(Mother Tongue, Book 2). Easy Classics. Spelling-. 

History. — Grecian History (Myers). Roman History (Myers). 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Durell andRobbins). Reviewed. Alge- 
bra (Wells). 

SECOND FORM. 

English. — Composition and Rhetoric (Lock wood and Emerson). 
Spelling-. (Throughout the year). 

French. — Grammar (Fraser and Squair). Readings — easy selec- 
tions. 

History. — United States History (McLaughlin). (Second half- 
year). ^English History (Montgomery). 

Mathematics. — Algebra (Wells). Completed. (First half-year.) 
Geometry (Robbins). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Fairbanks). 

THIRD PORM. 

English. — Elementally Composition Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). 
Study of Words (Buehler). English Composition. Word-Building 
(Kellogg and Reed). (Throughout the year). 

English Readings. — Critical study of the works of authors pre- 
scribed for college entrance requirements. 

French. — French, continued. 

German. — Grammar (Vos's Essentials). Readings — easy selec- 
tions. 

Mathematics. — Plane Geometry (Robbins). Solid Geometry 
(Phillips and Fisher). 

FOURTH FORM. 

English. — Composition Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). Study of the 
English Sentence (Kimball). English Composition, continued. 

English Readings.— Critical study of the works of authors pre- 
scribed for college entrance requirements. 

German. — Continued. 

*History. — English History (Montgomery). 

Mathematics.— Higher Algebra (Hall and Knight). Plane Trigo- 
nometry (Crockett). 

Science. — Physics (Carhart and Chute). (Throughout the year). 

Note. — Students may substitute three years of Eatin for Higher 
Algebra, Solid Geometry, Trigonometry, and two years of either French 
or German. 



♦Optional. 



116 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

PIRST FORM. 

English. — English Grammar (Mother Tong-ue, Book 2). Spelling. 
Penmanship. 

Geography.— Geograp hy Descriptive (Frye). Geography Com- 
mercial (Gannett, Garrison, Huston). 

History. — Roman History (Myers). Grecian History (Myers). 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic (Durell and Robbins). Reviewed. 

SECOND FORM. 

English.— Rhetoric (Lockwood and Emerson). Spelling-. Pen- 
manship. 

German or Algebra. 

History.— History of the United States (McLaughlin). (One half- 
year). 

Mathematics. — Commercial Arithmetic (Moore and Miner). (One 
half-year). 

Science. — Physical Geography (Fairbanks). 

THIRD FORM. 

Book-Keeping. — Theory (Sadler and Rowe). (One half-year). 
Business. — Business Forms and Customs (Peirce). (One half-year). 
English. — Composition and Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). 
German continued or Geometry. 

History. — Mediaeval and Modern (Myers). (One half-year). 
English History (Montgomery). (One half-year). 
Physics. — Physics (Carhart and Chute). 

FOURTH FORM. 

Book-Keeping. — Practical Book-Keeping (Moore and Miner). 
(One half-year). 

Business. — Business Law and Parliamentary Usage (Huffcut). 
(One half-year). 

Civics. — Civics (Forman). (One half-year). 

English. — Rhetoric (Scott and Denny). 

Stknooraimiv and Typewriting. (Pitman-Howard). 

COURSE IN COMMERCE. 

Beginning with the academic year 1909-10 ■ course In commerce 
described in the order of studies a* the Commercial Course, was estab- 
shed. Tin- reasons for the establishment of this Commercial Coum 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 117 

were, first, the constant inquiries coming to the School as to the exist- 
ence of such a course; second, the fact that many students desiring- to 
enter Conway Hall have been compelled to go elsewhere to secure what 
the School had hitherto been unable to offer; and, third, the fact that 
such a course now seems to be a necessary part of any up-to-date second- 
ary school. The course as outlined supplies a need long recognized as 
existing, and offers students contemplating business courses, advan- 
tages not to be found in purely business schools, and at the same time 
affords to those purposing college or technical courses, opportunity for 
instruction in certain matters with which all educated men and women 
should be to some extent familiar. 

Equipment. — The department is fully equipped with such office 
furniture as is visual in a good business house. 

Practical Accounting.— The department offers actual business 
practice in accounting, banking, etc. 

Special Courses.— Students not wishing to complete the entire 
course will be allowed to take such work as their previous training en- 
ables them to accomplish with thoroughness. 

Diplomas. — The regular Diploma of the School will be given to those 
completing the full course of Commerce; certificates to those com- 
pleting the special courses. 

Expenses. — The regular rates for those taking the Commercial 
Course in full will be the same as for the other courses of the School, 
(See p. 124 of the catalogue.) 

Special. — For parties not regularly in the Commercial Course who 
may desire instruction in typewriting, there will be a charge of ten 
dollars per term. For instruction in stenography the special charge 
will be ten dollars a term. 

METHODS OP INSTRUCTION. 

ENGLISH. 

Mr. Swift and Mr. Cleland. 

Special attention is given to the study of English. In the first 
year a careful study of grammar is made, together with composition 
writing based on the easier English classics. In the second year Lock- 
wood and Emerson's Composition and Rhetoric is pursued. Special 
emphasis is placed on letter writing and descriptive composition work, 
and several English classics are read. In the third and fourth years 
Scott and Denny's text-books on Rhetoric, both elementary and ad- 
vanced, are studied. 

A reading course has also been established in the school, which em- 
braces all the classics necessary for college entrance. Both the Third 
and Fourth forms read these classics outside of the class room each 



118 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



term, and are examined in the same at the end of the term. The aim of 
this course is to interest the student in the careful reading- of standard 
works, as well as to prepare him for college. 

Five hours a week are devoted to this study during each of the four 
years, part of which is given to the English classics. The student is 
drilled in the use of ornamental expression, but more than this he is 
taught the value of his native tongue in its practical, everyday form. 
In carrying out this idea the methods employed are such as to render 
the work of personal interest to each student. 

GREEK. 

Mr. Shenton. 

During the first year, White's First Year Greek is used and in the 
Spring term, easy selections are read; a vocabulary of several hundred 
words is acquired, and the main facts of Greek grammar learned. 

The work of the second year is devoted to a careful study of the 
Anabasis and a thorough analysis of the Greek sentence. 

In the third year, Homer's Iliad is read and special emphasis is 
placed upon the study of prose composition. 

HISTORY. 

Mr. Ceeland. 

The course in History embraces the study of the histories of the 
United States, of Greece, and of Rome. 

It is the purpose of the elementary courses to enable the student to 
master leading facts and principles— to familiarize him with the events 
and their underlying causes. 

The advanced course in United States history deals particularly 
with the constitutional and political development of the country. It 
presents a rapid synopsis of the processes through which our national 
life has acquired its present forms. 

In addition to the above work in history, a course in the History of 
England and a course in mediaeval and modern history are offered to 
those students preparing for the registration examination prescribed by 
the Board of Law Examiners of the State of Pennsylvania, 

LATIN. 
Mk. SUPEB am) Mi;. Shknton. 
The main object of the work in this department is a preparation in 
the Latin required for entrance into our Colleges ami universities. At 
the close of the first year's work, the student is expected l" !><> thor- 
oughly familiar with the various iniiretiou.il endings, au<i prepared 
rapidlj to utilise his knowledge in the ordinary case, tense, ami mood 

COnstrUCi ions. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 119 

Classes are started in a beginner's book each term and, by a process 
of grading, the best results are obtained in each individual case. It is 
thus possible for a bright student to do double work during the latter 
part of the course, thus saving much time, a point of importance in the 
case of mature students. 

In the work of translation, after the first year's preparation, an 
effort is made to secure a graceful rendering into idiomatic English. 
The much decried "mongrel idiom, half Latin and half English," is 
avoided, and the careless interpretation of the I^atin word by the use of 
an English derivative is discouraged. 

Syntax is thoroughly studied, both by direct reference to the gram- 
mar in connection with Eatin composition, and by a constant consid- 
eration of the syntactical problem presented in the daily task. The 
aim of all instruction in syntax is, of course, to aid the pupil in arriving 
at the meaning of the author, thus making grammatical knowledge a 
means and not an end. 

During the entire course, and especially in the fourth year, con- 
siderable time is devoted to sight translation. Easy passages from the 
authors read are selected, and besides, a text especially adapted for this 
purpose is supplied for class-room work. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Dr. Hutchison, Mr. Blades and Mr. Arnold. 

The essential correlation of the different branches of mathematics 
is recognized, and in teaching each branch those subjects are especially 
dwelt upon which have important bearing upon future work. In the 
study of arithmetic some subjects are deferred until taken up in the 
algebra, while other subjects, ordinarily unessential, such as average 
of payments, duties and customs, and the like, are omitted altogether. 
It is aimed to give the students a rigid drill in those subjects which are 
the most practical, and which are especially pertinent to college work. 
Oral exercises form an important part of the work in arithmetic. 

In the algebra special stress is laid upon fundamental laws and 
principles, in order to make the work less mechanical to the student. 
Factoring and Radicals are recognized as especially important, and 
a complete mastery of these subjects is insisted upon. Algebra is 
completed by the Third form, but all students are required to review 
the entire branch in the class-room during the last term of their course. 

The plan adopted in beginning the study of geometry is to make 
haste slowly. An entire term is taken in covering the first two books. 
It is aimed from first to last to train the student to think independently 
and, though all needed assistance is given him, this idea is kept con- 
stantly in mind. About one-half of the time devoted to geometry is 
consumed upon entirely original work. 



120 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

Mr. McKkk and Mr. Super. 

The instruction in the Modern languages aims to meet the demand 
due to the rapidly increasing importance of these branches of study. 
Two years' work in either French or German is required of students in 
the Latin-Scientific course. In the Scientific course four years of 
Modern languages, consisting of two years' work in each language, 
is demanded. 

The object of the course is to thoroughly ground students in the 
fundamentals of these languages so that they will be able to continue 
with pleasure and profit the work in this department. In this course 
the aim is to cover from six hundred to eight hundred pages in the 
German readings, and from eight hundred to one thousand pages of 
French. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

During the Fall term of each year the members of the Fourth form 
are required to deliver declamations in public. In the latter part of the 
year, original orations are given. 

The literary societies afford excellent opportunity for practice in 
declamation and debate, and students are encouraged to join one or the 
other of the societies. Besides the work regularly done by them, de- 
bates regularly held between the literary societies, inter-scholastic de- 
bates, and prizes offered for excellence in declamation, stimulate inter- 
est in public speaking. 

At the regular meetings of the societies, and during the practice 
preliminary to any public appearance, instruction is given in the prin- 
ciples which underlie the art of public discourse. Thus, by require- 
ment and encouragement, work in declamation and debate is made one 
of the distinctive features of the school life. 

SCIENCE. 

Mk. Bladks and Mk. Arnold. 
To meet the needs of students entering institutions where two sci- 
ences are required, the school offers two courses : one in Pli3 r sical Geog- 
raphy and Geology, each study covering one-half a year's work; the 
other in Physics, pursued throughout the year. The school has access 

to a well assorted collection of geological and mineral specimens. Fre- 
quent field excursions are made and note-hooks on observations are 
kept. The school possesses .1 well equipped physical laboratory for use 
in this department, and it is the .iiin to COndUCl the work of the depart- 
ment , in lar^e measure, by the l.i b<.i. it .u y method. The student's e\- 
perimental work La selected judiciously by the teacher and is constantly 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 121 

under his immediate supervision. Each student is required to keep in 
a note-book the results of his laboratory work. 

UNITS OF WORK REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. 

A student having credit for fourteen units is entitled to the school 
diploma. 

When a Senior's schedule completes the requirements for admission 
to his chosen college, he may select work in any of the other courses to 
complete the number of units required for graduation. A unit is a year's 
work in a given subject pursued five periods per week. 

MODE OE CLASSIFYING STUDENTS. 

Beginning with the academic year, 1910-11, the units of work re- 
quired will be as follows: 

For the Fourth form, 13 units. 

For the Third form, 9 units. 

For the Second form, 4 units. 

All other students will be classified in the First form. 

CONWAY HALL. 

The students are now occupying the handsome school building re- 
cently constructed at a cost of about $66,000. The total value of the 
plant, including grounds and Headmaster's residence, is $84,000. 

The lot upon which the building stands is located but half a square 
from the college campus, with a frontage on High street of one hun- 
dred and fifty feet and extending northward to L,outher, a distance of 
five hundred feet. The windows of the building, on all sides, command 
most beautiful views of the surrounding country. The walls are of 
white brick with trimmings of brownstone. 

The width of the new structure is seventy-eight feet, and its depth, 
one hundred and eighty-three feet. It is four stories in height, the first 
floor being utilized for offices, recitation rooms, society halls for the 
literary organizations, waiting and dining halls. The second floor, in 
addition to students' rooms, contains the Chapel, which has a seating 
capacity for three hundred persons. The third and fourth stories of 
the building are used exclusively for dormitory purposes. In addition 
the building contains a spacious basement extending throughout its en- 
tire length. This basement is well lighted and heated and is perfectly 
free from dampness. It is divided into apartments, which are finished 
with as great care as the other portions of the building. The basement 
story contains, aside from storage rooms, bathing and dressing rooms, 
the book-room, reading room, laboratory, game room and a well equipped 
gymnasium. 

The building is one of the most complete of its kind in the country # 
It is heated by steam and lighted by electricity throughout. Each 



122 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

room is well ventilated and the sanitary arrangements are unsurpassed. 
The building- is perfectly healthful, both as to location and arrange- 
ment. 

No effort has been spared to construct a building - adapted in every 
particular to the needs and comfort of the students. The rooms are all 
comfortably furnished, and are cheerful and desirable. It has been the 
aim, in the consideration of every detail, to make the school thoroughly 
home-like. 

Dining hall. — Conway Hall is provided with a superb dining hall 
with ample accommodations for 150 students. Masters are present at 
all meals and every effort is made to secure the good order and polite 
behavior essential to cultivated men. 

Matron. — Realizing the importance of a woman's influence in mould- 
ing the characters of preparatory students — many of whom are young 
and inexperienced — the school is provided with a matron, a woman of 
character, and skilled in dealing with young men, who exercises a per- 
sonal supervision over the entire building, visiting each room daily, 
and looking carefully after the comfort and health of all students. 

Annex. — During the summer of 1905, a large and handsome annex, 
30x40 feet, three stories in height, with ample basement, was con- 
structed at the north end of Conway Hall, and connected by corridors 
with the same. On the first floor of the annex is a roomy modern 
kitchen, equipped with every convenience. On the second and third 
floors are suites of rooms for the use of the matron. 

School Infirmary. — In connection with the matron's quarters is a 
suite of rooms for accommodation of students temporarily ill and need- 
ing the matron's special care. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL. 

No entrance examination is required, but the students will be ex- 
pected to be proficient in spelling, the rudiments of English grammar 
and arithmetic, and in the writing of easy English. In cases where 
students enter advanced classes by certificates from other schools, they 
will be placed on trial in such classes as their certificates may seem to 
warrant. Definite gradation will afterward be determined according 
to their ability. Students are received at any time during the year, 

though entrance at the beginning of the term is, for many reasons, de- 
sirable, They should be In Carlisle at least one day earlier than the 

day appointed for the beginning of the Fall sesshm, and promptly on 
hand at the opening of each subseqneat term. Bach student upon en- 
tering must furnish ■ certificate as to his moral character. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 123 

ADMISSION TO COLLEGE. 

As the examinations of Conway Hall are made under the super- 
vision of the Faculty of the School, students passing satisfactorily on 
the studies required for admission to the Freshman* class of Dickinson 
college will be received without further examination. All of the col- 
leges of the country, including technical and professional schools, that 
accept school certificates in lieu of examinations for entrance, accept 
such certificates from this institution. 

BOARDING. 

All students, save day students, are required to room and board in 
the building. The boarding arrangements are under the general super- 
vision of the Faculty, most of whom dine with the students. It is 
aimed to supply the students with the best and most wholesome food, 
well prepared and well served. The school provides a table unexcelled 
in any school in the country. 

COURSES OP STUDY. 

The special work of this school is to prepare young men and young 
women for college or for technical schools. In preparing students for 
admission to Dickinson college, it satisfies the requirements of the 
oldest colleges in the country. Besides the special work of preparing 
students for college, a general academic education is given to those who 
cannot take a regular course. 

There are four courses, arranged with reference to fitting students 
for courses in college, as follows: 1. Classical course; 2. L^atin-Scientfic 
course; 3. Scientific course; 4. Commercial course. 

Each of these courses extends through four years. Students who 
have covered a part of any course before entering will be allowed to 
complete it as speedily as possible. The student is not compelled to 
rigidly follow the schedule if he can show that the work previously done 
has been well done. Every facility is furnished to students of mature 
age to complete their preparation as speedily as may be desirable. Un- 
less by reason of age or limited means the student is constrained to 
hasten preparaton, and unless in such cases there is exceptional physical 
vigor, it is earnestly recommended that the time prescribed in the cata- 
log for the different courses be not abridged. 

DIPLOMAS. 

Commencement exercises are held during the last week of the school 
year. Orations are delivered by the six members of the graduating 
class who obtain the highest standing during their course, and by the 
two students found to be the most proficient in the regular work of the 
Fourth form of the English department, such work to include the de- 
livery of declamations and original orations. Diplomas are awarded, 



124 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

at the time of graduation, to all those who complete, without condition, 
one of the established courses of the school. A diploma fee of $2.50 
will be charged. 

EXPENSES. 

For students residing in the school building, the total charge 
ranges between $300 and $350, according to the choice of the student of 
a double room (two occupants), a single room, a front corner room, a 
suite of rooms, or a double room (one occupant). The charge, deter- 
mined by choice of room, will cover all expenses for furnished room, 
lighting of the same, steam heat, board, tuition, laundry — save fine 
linen — everything, indeed, except books, and the athletic fee of five 
dollars collected by the treasurer of the school at the request of the 
student body, and by him paid over to the Athletic Association of the 
School for the furtherance of athletic interests. This fee entitles the 
student to free admission to the athletic games and contests taking 
place on the Biddle Memorial Field. 

The total charge for students residing in the town is $75 per year, 
plus the athletic charge of five dollars mentioned in the foregoing 
paragraph. 

During the school year two bills are presented, one for the Fall 
term and the other covering the charges for the Winter and Spring 
terms combined. It should be observed that the Fall term bill is for 
two-fifths of the academic year, and the combined Winter and Spring 
term bill is for the remaining three-fifths. This latter may be paid in 
two installments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days following 
the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once, ami will be 
required by the noon of October 15th following 1 . 

The combined Winter and Spring term bill will be presented within 
the ten days following the opening of the Winter term. Payment U 
expect* d at once, and will be required by the noon of January 25th. it 
paid in two installments, the one for the Winter term and the other fbf 
the Spring term, payment must be made by January 25th and by April 
15th, respectively. 

Beginning with the academic year 1911-18, every student, at the 
opt hi 'in/ of each U rm, before bi ing admitted to any class, must pay over 
to the treasurer of the College^ or to the Headmaster, the sum of $10.00, 
which sum will be orediU d upon the student's U rm bill. 

Extension of time will not be granted for the payment of hills unless 
written application on forms to be provided by the treasurer is macU be* 
fon the (ini's set for their payment. Failure to attend to this matter 
will rencU > a student liabU to exclusion from recitations or from the 
Sohoot. No reduction on any U rm bill will be allowed for less than four 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 125 

weeks of continuous absence, for any cause, during any part of any term. 
For a period of absence in excess of four continuous weeks a reduction of 
one-half the pro rata, or weekly, charge will be allowed. 

In cases where two or more students from the same family shall be 
in the school at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent, on the term 
bill of each will be made. 

No student can have honorable dismissal or certificate of progress 
in his studies until his bills have been duly adjusted. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, or money 
order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

The occupants of each room are held accountable for any damages 
to the room, and cost of the same must be paid promptly on presenta- 
tion of the bill. Any student proved to be guilty of destruction of, or 
damage to, school property, will be required to pay the cost of replace- 
ment or repair. In cases where the parties injuring- property are un- 
known, the cost of repairs is assessed upon the whole body of students 
towards the close of the school year. 

HOSPITAL. 

Located in Carlisle is an excellent hospital, the gift of Mrs. Sarah 
A. Todd, to which students are at any time admitted and where they 
are under the care of experienced nurses. In addition, the College has 
its own infirmary, equipped with all necessary conveniences. In cases 
of severe illness, or in those requiring particular care, the patients can 
be at once removed to either the Todd Hospital or the College Infirmary. 

GYMNASIUM. 

Students of schools of a similar grade seldom have access to so fine 
a gymnasium and to one so splendidly equipped in every detail, and few 
are so fortunate as to receive the benefit of the training of a physical 
instructor so careful and experienced. The office of the director is sup- 
plied with the best of instruments for ascertaining, by measurements 
and by testing the vital organs, the condition of each student. Such 
examination at the outset, and its repetition at intervals later in the 
course, furnish data for judiciously adapting exercises to individual 
peculiarities and to changing conditions, and hence for promoting sym- 
metrical development. Thegymnasium furnishesample accommodation 
to meet all the modern demands for physical training. The main hall, 
seventy-five feet in length by forty in width, is flanked on the eastern 
and western extremities by wings; the western wing, in dimensions 
eighty-four feet by twenty, contains the baseball cage, and the eastern, 
sixty feet by twenty, is appropriated to office purposes and bathing and 
dressing room accommodations. It has a running gallery two hundred 



126 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

and thirty-live feet in length, bath rooms, dressing rooms, and office. 
The students of Conway Hall are regularly drilled twice per week 
during the winter, and have general practice in gymnasium four times 
per week. The physical instructor is always present, and is careful to 
see that nothing hazardous is attempted. 

In addition a large room has been fitted up in the main school 
building, with shuffle boards, chest weights, etc., for the double purpose 
of exercise and pleasure. Within three minutes' walk of the School is 
the Athletic field, affording every opportunity for recreation and out- 
door physical exercise. 

THE HERMAN BOSLER BIDDLE MEMORIAL ATHLETIC EIELD. 

Through the thoughtful generosity of the Hon. and Mrs. Edward 
W. Biddle, of Carlisle, the College has recently come into possession of 
one of the finest and best equipped athletic fields in the country, 
known as "TheHerman BoslerBiddleMemorial Athletic Field," so named 
in loving memory of their lamented son, Herman Bosler Biddle, class of 
'03. The Field which is more than six acres in area, located on the 
Chambersburg turnpike, easily accessible from the College and Conway 
Hall, is admirably adapted to the purposes for which it has been pre. 
pared. The Field is entered at the northeastern corner through a noble 
gateway, most artistically designed, with massive abutments of brick 
with trimmings of stone, and provided with iron gates of elegant de- 
sign. In the pillar at the right side is a chaste and beautiful tablet of 
bronze, with letters in relief, bearing the following appropriate inscrip- 
tion: 

THE HERMAN BOSEER BIDDEE 

MEMORIAE ATHEETIC FIEED 

1883 1908 

CEASS OF 1903 

On the western side is the noble Grand Stand with strong brick 

wall, six feet in height, extending the entire Length, and pierced by 

three entrance ways, reached by steps rising from the outside. The 

which are com tructed on th - plan of those in the grand Stand Of 

the Franklin Field of tin- University oi Pennsylvania, are exceedingly 
comfortable, and win accommodate nine hundred and fifty spectators. 
in front of the Grand stand stretches tin- straightaway track, twenty 

Ice) in width, the same forming a section of the quarter-mile track, 
every pari of which is in full view of the stand. Within the ellipse 

formed by the track is located the diamond and gridiron required fof 
..ill .md football work. Ample opportunity Is afforded for s second 

diamond and, if need be, a second gridiron loi practice purposes. »>n 

the eastern side five model tennis courts have been constructed. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 127 

ATHLETICS. 

The students are encouraged to enter some form of athletic sport, 
as a means of physical development. The various teams are under the 
supervision of some one of the masters. A student will be debarred 
from participating- in any public contest if, in the judgment of the fac- 
ulty, his athletics are interfering with his work. Within a mile of the 
school, the picturesque Conodoguinet affords excellent facilities for 
boating and skating, while many pleasure resorts are easily accessible 
by convenient trolley lines. 

LECTURES. 

The students of Conway Hall have the privilege of attending the 
public lectures given under the auspices of the College. 

LIBRARY AMD READING ROOM. 

The Library of the College, the privileges of which are available 
to students of Conway Hall, under established regulations, consists of 
three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — that of the College 
proper, which is exceedingly rich in old volumes and in reference books 
and the libraries of the two college literary societies, accumulated by 
them during the century of their existence. 

The Reading Room of the College, located in Bosler Memorial Hall, 
and furnished with the best of reading room appliances, is accessible to 
students of Conway Hall. Its files have been supplied with a fair 
representation of the great secular dailies, religious weeklies, and best 
periodicals, thus enabling the students to keep familiar with the drift of 
daily events, and to have access to much of the best current literature. 

A reading room for the special use of students, equally well fur- 
nished and attractive, has also been established in the school building. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Gamma Epsilon Iyiterary society and the Reed Literary so- 
ciety, while under the general control and supervision of the Faculty, 
are entirely managed by the students. Effective and valuable work is 
done by their members, who are interested in further developing the 
work of the organizations, and in maintaining a healthful rivalry be- 
tween them. The preliminary training secured in these societies is a 
great aid in the work afterwards to be done in the college literary or- 
ganizations. 



128 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Officers— Gamma Epsilon Society. 

President — John B. Lerch. 
Vice President— Bruce R. Cardon. 
Secretary— George R. Griffiths. 
Treasurer — Robert R. Price. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — John W. Morrow. 
Clerk — Chas. F. Bi^anning. 
Chaplain — Edward C. Boss. 
Junior Critic— Chas. F. Lewis. 
Senior Critic — Prof. J. Hugh McKee. 

Prof. Clarence G. Shenton. 

Officers— Reed Society. 

President — Chas. H. Prowse. 
Vice President— Clark L,. Cornwall. 
Secretary — J. N. DEETER. 
Treasurer— Francisco J. Ferrer. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Clark P. Horn. 
Chaplain— George Hukill. 
Junior Critic — Joseph A. McGrath. 
Senior Critic— Prof. J. Henry Super, Jr. 
Prof. J. S. Cleland. 

Officers— Athletic Association. 

President — Raymond L. Mowbray. 

Vice President — Robert J. Slater. 

Secretary— Chas. F. Lewis. 

Treasurer— Prof. John Henry Super, Jr. 

Manager of Football — Robert J. Slater. 

Manager of Baseball— Chas. F. Lewis. 

Manager of Basketball — John Buczko. 

Captain of Football — William Hope Martin. 

Captain of Baseball — Hyman Goldstkin. 

Advisory Board — Raymond L. MOWBRAY, ROBERT J. Si.atkk, Chas- 

F. Lewis; Luther E. Bashore, '09, Alumni Representative; Prof, 

John Henry Supek, Jw., and Prop. Webster 9. Blades, Faculty 

Representative*. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 
The School Y. M. C. A. is an Important factor la developing the 
religious life of the School, [ta tnemben are Loyal and earnest, ami 

much gOOd lias been done by their Hloits. They have Organised ■ 

course in Bible study, irhich forms ■ Link In the chain <d courses of 
Bible study in the College v. m. c. a., and also have accumulated s 

missionary library ol considerable sisCi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 129 

Officers. 

President — Raymond Luther Mowbray. 

Vice-President— Charles F. Lewis. 

Recording- Secretary and Treasurer — Alexander A. Bouton, Jr. 

LOCATION. 

The school is located in the Cumberland valley, so justly noted for 
its beauty, fertility, and healthfulness, less than an hour's ride from 
Harrisburg. The latter city is easily accessible from all points. 

OUTFIT. 

Each student should come provided with towels, napkins, one pair 
of blankets, sheets and pillow cases, together with such toilet articles 
as he may deem necessary. Articles of wearing- apparel should be dis- 
tinctly marked. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITY SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Beginning- with the academic year 1910-11, a certain number of 
School Activity Scholarships, ranging in value from twenty-five to 
fifty dollars, will be awarded under the following conditions: — 

First, the student must present certification from some responsible 
party that he is in need of financial assistance. 

Second, his standing and deportment must be of high grade. 

Third, he must have been successfully engaged in some one of the 
following school activities: (1) literary society work; (2) Y. M. C. A. 
work; (3) some form of athletic work. 

PRIZES. 

The Dare Prize, of twenty dollars, the gift of the College, will be 
awarded to that member of the graduating class, entering the College 
proper, who shall be found to have attained the highest excellence in 
the studies preparatory to any course of Dickinson college. 

Last year the prize was won by Samuel Loomis Mohler. 

The President's Prize, of ten dollars, the gift of the president of the 
College, will be awarded to that literary society which shall excel in 
public inter-society debate. 

This prize last year was awarded to the Gamma Fvpsilon Society, 
Emory Bailey Rockwell, Raymond Luther Mowbray, and George Ray- 
mond Lord representing- the Society. 

SPECIAL PRIZES, 1909-10. 

1. In the academic year 1909-10, a prize of fifteen dollars, the gift 
of an alumnus of the school, was awarded to that member of the Junior 
class who attained the highest rank in the studies of the year. Award- 
ed to George Raymond Lord. 



130 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



REPORTS. 

Reports of the work are submitted to students and parents at the 
end of the first four weeks of each term and every three weeks there- 
after. Besides these reports a term report containing- summation of the 
student's record for the term is sent at the end of each term to the par- 
ents. These reports contain grades of work done by the student and 
also the average grade of the class. 

A term grade of 90 per cent, or more in a given subject in which no 
tri-weekly report has been .below 85 per cent., will make final examina- 
tion in the given subject optional. 

ROOMS. 

All students, save day students, are required to reside, as well as 
board, in the school building. All rooms are furnished and provided 
with every appliance necessary for comfort. Applications for rooms 
should be made as early as possible before the day appointed for the 
opening of the term. 

RULES AMD REGULATIONS. 

All students are required to conform strictly to the hours, rules and 
general regulations of the school. These are the usual rules of schools 
of similar grade. While the discipline of the school is not harsh, it is 
nevertheless of such a nature as to insure the most healthful conditions 
of moral and intellectual development. The following offenses might 
be mentioned, among others, which are to be particularly guarded 
against: dishonesty in examinations, the use of intoxicating liquors, 
gambling, smoking, or card playing in the building, hazing in every 
form, visiting improper places of amusement, insubordination of any 
nature, leaving Carlisle without special permission, defacing or injur- 
ing property, undue noise or disturbance upon the school premises, or 
in Carlisle, and, in general, any conduct which would cast discredit 
upon the student or the School. 

STUDY MALL. 

Every effort is made to insure favorable condition! for study. Pot 
this purpose i study Ball bas been opened for the accommodation ol 

d;iy pupils .md such other pupils as nrcd assistance. This Hall is 

under the constant supervision of one of the masters* ECxcept when 
engaged In recitationi pupils, when assigned to thia Ball, are required 

to OCCUpy seats therein, and all uncxcused absences will be recorde< 

.!;• ,i i nst t he si udcnt. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 131 

SUPERVISION. 

The teachers room in the school building- with the students, and 
have personal oversight. The contact of teacher and pupil is so con- 
stant and intimate, that the harmful or chronically indolent pupil is 
soon discovered, and every effort made to inspire a love of work, and to 
cultivate habits of continuous and independent study. Parents are 
urged not to furnish, or permit others to furnish, their sons with an un- 
due amount of money. If experience teaches anything-, it is that stu- 
dents are thus demoralized. Young- students should have a patron, 
usually the Headmaster, whose duty shall be to manage their finances 
and render an account to the parent or guardian. 



Register of Students. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 135 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS. 

C. — Classical Course. 
Iv. S. — L,atin-Scientific Course. 
Sc. — Scientific Course. 
Ph. — Philosophical Course. 

Sp. — A student temporarily irregular in his class. 
P. — A student taking - a partial course not intending - graduation. 
E. C— East Colleg-e; W. C— West College; S. C— South College; 
L,. H.— Uoyd Hall (for Ladies); C. H.— Conway Hall. 

Where no other state is mentioned, residence is in Pennsylvania. 



I. COLLEGE. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Name. Residence. 

Albert, Edna, ('05) Williamsport. 

Ansley, Foster C, ('08) Birmingham, Ala. 

Baker, G. Harold, ('10) Aberdeen, Md. 

Balls, Harry J., ('10) Philadelphia. 

Carver, Arthur H., ('02) L,ee, Mass. 

Demaree, Joseph P., ('09) New York City. 

Dout, Samuel R., ('10) Hummelstown. 

Evans, Elizabeth M., ('09) Kennet Square. 

Harnish, J. Hiestand, ('10) Allenwood. 

Hartzell, Lina M., ('10) Carlisle. 

Kelbaugh, Charles H., ('10) Carlisle. 

Leinbach, Magdalene B., ('10) Englishtown, N. J. 

Mack, Frank, ('98) Summit Hill. 

McKee, J. Hugh, ('09) ..Carlisle. 

Powell, Charles D., ('09) Rahway, N. J. 

Salter, Charles M., ('06) Toronto, Canada. 

Shepherd, Clarence M., y\0) Wilmerding. 

Stuart, H. Chalmers, ('10) Terryville, Conn. 

Super, John H., Jr., ('09) Carlisle. 

Wallis, Wilson D., ('07) Forrest Hill, Md. 

Williams, John W., ('09) Greensboro, Md. 

Woodward, Julia B., ('09) Carlisle. 

Yeingst, Wilbur M., ('97) Minersville. 

Young, Charles R., ('09) West Fairview. 



136 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SENIORS. 



Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Adams, Forrest E Sc Atlantic City, N. J 28 W. C. 

Albertson, Albert O E. S...Newville Newville. 

Arntzen, Ella M Ph Brooklyn, N. Y 32 W. Pomfret. 

Barringer, Aaron H E. S ..Harrisburg Harrisburg-. 

Boell, Victor H E. S...Morristown, N. J 21 W. C. 

Bowers, Edna A C Harrisburg E. H. 

Briggs, Irene E. S... Carlisle W. Main. 

Briner, Charles S C Carlisle 141 N. College. 

Caldwell, Rankin S C Harrisburg.. .Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Clarkson, J. Eeeds C Eewistown 10 E. C. 

Cleaver, C. EeRoy Ph Mt. Carmel 14 W. C. 

Corning, H. Munson E- S... Washington, D. C. ...Sigma Alpha Ep. House. 

Crane, J. Ernest Ph Branchville, N. J.. Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Deardorff, Merle H E. S. ..Waynesboro Phi Delta Theta House. 

Dum, Ray S E. S... Carlisle 629 S. Hanover. 

Eitzel, Howards C Reading 21 E. C. 

Galley, Blanche M E. S...Mt. Pleasant 156 W. Pomfret. 

Gish, Harvey O E. S...Middletown 18 W. C. 

Globisch, Bertha S E. S... Lancaster 121 S. Pitt. 

Hemphill, J. Sharp L. S...Shippensburg.. Shippensburg. 

Hench, Eouise Ph Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Hoch, Harry K E. S...Woodside, Del 6-8 S. C. 

Holloway, Chester C E. S... Newark, Md. Sigma Alpha Bp. House, 

Hopkins, James P E. S... Chester 21 W. C. 

Horn, Allen P E. S... Donaldson Si&rma Chi House. 

Hughes, James H., Jr E. S...Felton, Del UphaChi Rho House, 

Kilmore, Manetta E C Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg, 

Kisner, Florence R E. S... Carlisle 136 W. Eouther. 

Kramer, Charles F E. S... Harrisburg 1 K. C 

Eandis, William B E. S...k\»ck Glen Uphs Chi Rho House 

Eeas, Goldie L. S... Carlisle Conway Hall. 

I /eh man, M. Helen I,. S... Shippensburg Shippensburg 

Lodge, Charles M I*. S... Crystal Spring M PhJ Kappa sicnu House. 

Eoeser, Harry K I,. S... Harrisburg Phi Kappa Blffma House. 

Eorenz, R. Donald \ 4 . 8. ..Roaring Springs PW Delta Theta House. 

McCullough, Bessie C Carlisle 2M w. South. 

M.nk i in, George T [*. S...Milford, Del Phi Kappa p Housa 

Milburn, iCniiiv s i y . s. .. i Um khannon W. Va I,. II. 

Miller, .i. Rolls L. S...Oakvllle Oakvllle. 

Miller, Susan i. s .Reading 156 w. Pomfret. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 137 

Miller, Thomas B Iv. S... Plymouth Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Morgan, Julia C Carlisle 243 W. Ivouther. 

Moyer, Frank B C Williamsport...Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Nagle, J. Stewart C Baltimore, Md 22 W. C. 

Peffer, Fylmer Sc Carlisle Carlisle. 

Phares, W. Carleton Sc Trenton, N. J 37 E. C. 

Quimby,KarlK C Chester, N. J 26 W. C. 

Richmond, Leon H Iv. S...Stroudsburg 19 E. C. 

Salter, Vaughn T Sc Shamokin phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Shenton, Jennie D C Carlisle 516 N. West. 

Shuck, Albert C. C Newville Newville. 

Smith, Clara Bell Iv. S... Wilmington, Del Iv. H. 

Smith, H. Elmore Iv. S...Jarrettsville, Md... Kappa Sigma House. 

Smith, Ray P L. S... Carlisle 805 N. West. 

Smith, W. Moore Iv. S...Hazleton 28 W. C. 

Strock, Grace S C Carlisle 337 N. Hanover. 

Stroup, J. Meetch Iv. S...Millersburg 5 Fv. C. 

Stuart, Roy F Iv. S... Carlisle 147 S. College. 

Teel, Harold G C Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

Thompson, Howard Fv C Williamstown 13 W. C. 

Thompson, Vance Iv. S... Carlisle 261 W. Ivouther. 

Van Blarcom, Martin L. S...Paterson, N. J 37 S. C. 

Vosburg, Percy Iv I*. S.. .Clark's Summit Phi Kappa Sigma House- 

Williams, Gordon Arch C Port Matilda 26 W. C. 

Williamson, Helen K C Carlisle iy 2 Fv. Main. 

Witmer, M. Fyleta Iv. S... Lancaster Iv. H. 

Wright, J. Arthur Iv. S...Coatesville 6-8 S. C. 

JUNIORS. 

Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Aldridge, Alfred H Iv. S...Fayetteville 43 Fv. C. 

Andrus, Fred. Iv Iv. S... Ralston 18 W. C. 

Beard, William M Iv. S...Williamsport, Md 23 Fv. C. 

Beaven, Walter C Ph Port Deposit, Md BetaThetaPi House. 

Bell, Lewis W C Newville Newville- 

Biddle, David H h. S...Mechanicsburg 16 W. C 

Black, William S L. S...Chambersburg Beta Theta Pi House. 

Blanning, Wendell Y L,. S.. .Williamstown 44 E. C. 

Bramble, Clinton C L. S...Centreville, Md 22 E. C. 

Bullock, Russell E L. S...E. Mauch Chunk 22 E. C. 

Burns, Sarah Helen Ph West Chester Iv. H. 

Carruthers, Helen A C Carlisle 261 W. Pomfret. 

Dorcus, Fydwin S Iv. S...Port Deposit, Md 30 Fv. C. 



138 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Drumm, Kathryn S E. S...Mountville E. H 

Evaul, Harry C Palmyra, N. J 2 W. C. 

Fry, Clarence A E. S.-.Harrisburg - Kappa Sig-ma House. 

Garber, Helen F C Carlisle (Diffley's Point) N.Hanover. 

Glauser, Willis K E. S...Newville Newville. 

Hall, John A. F E. S...Harrisburg 11 W. C. 

Handwork, Edna M E. S...Birdsboro E. H. 

Hays, William E E. S...Eandisburg 16 E. C. 

Heller, Ruth E. S...Hazleton 156 W. Pomfret. 

Hemphill, John H C Altoona Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Henderson, D. Albert, Jr Sc Brookville 14 W. C. 

Hertzler, Russell C E. S...Harrisburg- 20 W. C. 

Humphrey, Walter F E. S... Philadelphia-Alpha Chi RhoHouse. 

Jenkins, Mary R E. S... Danville Iv. H. 

Reiser, Mabel M C Carlisle 215 Walnut. 

Kelley, Bessie C C Carlisle 115 E. South. 

Kitto, Charles W C Pen Argyl 27 E. C. 

Eeidig, Jacob B L. S...Chambersburg 43 E. C. 

Eeininger, George E Ph Orwigsburg 33 W. C. 

Eosey, Raymond W Ph Blairstown, N.J 26 E. C. 

Martin, J. Freed L. S...Shippensburg 46 E. C. 

Martin, Thompson S E. S...West Fairview..rhi Kappa Sigma House. 

Miller, S. Carroll E. S...Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Moorehead, G. EeRoy C Carlisle 351 N. Hanover. 

Mumper, Norris M Ph Trenton, N. J phi Kappa Psi House. 

Myers, Eottie E C Carlisle 114 S. Bedford. 

Perry, Frances E L. S...Centreville, Md L. H. 

Rahn, Earl E Ph Weavertown 3 W. C. 

Renn, Paul R E.S.. Sunbury Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Rider, Edna E E.S... Tyrone 156 W. Pomfret. 

Roberts, Mary Elma E. S... Denton, Md E. H. 

Rowland, George H. G Ph Fox Chase, Phila... Kappa Sigma House. 

Sadler, Gilbert H E. S... Carlisle 22<> Walnut. 

Sellers, grnest H C Carlisle West A Walnut, 

Shields, Richard A E. S...Morrisdale Minos 13 K. C. 

Shilling, Robert E L*.8...Felton, Del \iphi Chi RhoHouse. 

Siugiscr, Romaine C Carlisle 213 Walnut. 

Smith, Carrie s C Carlisle sos n. West. 

Bonn, Waller K I,. S... Harrisburg Upha Chi Rho House. 

Spahr, Murray II L*. S...Mechanicsburg Phi Kappa Sifftna House. 

St an II er, S. Waller I «. B...Walkersville, aid Sigma llpha Bp. House. 

Steckel, Harrej H E. S...31atlngtoii 6 8 s. C. 

Btrawinski, William K C Huntingdon M \\. C. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 139 

Strite, Edwin D E.S...Chambersburg 31 W. C. 

Stuart, Ruth H C Carlisle 147 S. College. 

Todd, Glenn E E. S... Carlisle South & Pitt. 

Uhland, Eleanor E C Carlisle ...140 S. Pitt. 

Uhler, Joseph M Sc Carlisle 131 W. Pomfret. 

Van Auken, Charles E. S...Blairstown, N. J 26 E. C. 

Watkins, Vivian Ph Mt. Carmel Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Willey, EarlD E. S... Greenwood, Del 13 W. C. 

Woodward, Carrie W C Carlisle 160 S. Hanover. 

Zang, Melinda A E. S...Hazleton E. H. 



SOPHOMORES. 

Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Bashore, Euther E E. S... Schuylkill Haven Conway Hall. 

Beckett, John S C Millville, N. J 2 S. C. 

Blair, Miriam W C Carlisle 118 S. Hanover. 

Bowman, John B Sc Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Brady, S. Maude E. S...Williamsport E. H. 

Bubeck, Allan F E. S... Schuylkill Haven Conway Hall. 

Conover, J. Milton Ph... .Harrisonville, N. J 47 E. C. 

Deatrick, A. Marguerite C Mt. Pleasant E. H. 

Dick, Walter B Ph Dillsburg Kappa Sigma House. 

Dum, Miriam A C Carlisle 629 S. Hanover. 

Einstein, Robert S E. S... Carlisle 133 S. Pitt. 

Evans, Howard D Sc Harrington, Del Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Felton, JohnE Sc Everett 31 S. C. 

Fisher, Anna I C Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Garner, Elizabeth M E. S... Harrisburg E. H. 

Garton, Robert A E. S... Wyoming, Del 1 W. C. 

Gerhard, Helen S E. S... Clayton 156 W. Pomfret. 

Gilman, Harold A C Hartford, Conn.. Sigrma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Goudie, Aubrey B C Bainbridge 25 E. C. 

Griffiths, Wesley P C Williamstown 2 S. C. 

Groome, J. Cooper E. S... Carlisle 110 S. Pitt. 

Gruber, Jessie E E-S...Bernville E. H. 

Gunter, William A E.S...Frostburg, Md 17 W. C. 

Hargis, James H Sc Philadelphia 34 E. C. 

HarUel, Carl E.S... Harrisburg ..39 E. C. 

Herman, Margery E E.S. ..New Kingston New Kingston. 

Holland, HomerC E.S. ..Forest Hill, Md 33 W. C. 

Holtzman, Herbert P E- S...Fritztown 36 E. C. 

Hornberger, Floyd B Sc Eittlestown 40 E. C. 



140 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Hosie, Donald M E. S...Scranton Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Hosier, B. Harold E- S... Carlisle 535 N. Bedford. 

Jacobs, Horace E-, Jr ...Ph AltOOna Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Jennings, Arthur Bates, Jr....Ph New York City, N. Y 7 S. C. 

Johnson, Fenimore S L. S...Asbury Park, N. J 3 W. C. 

Johnston, Earl S E. S... Honey Brook 25 E. C" 

Kirkpatrick, Crawford N E. S... Waynesboro 32 W. C. 

Kisner, Hazel C C Carlisle 136 W. Eouther. 

Leaman, Clara J C Carlisle 45 E. Eouther. 

Logan, George E Ph Elliottson Elliottson 

McAnney, B. Olcott C Carlisle 30 W. C. 

McCune, William A Ph Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

MacGregor, Thomas W Sc Carlisle 200 S. C. 

Mclntire, John V C Carlisle 201 S. C. 

McKeown, Harry, Jr E.S... Chester 20 E. C. 

McMeen, Claude V Ph Enola Enola. 

Montgomery, Helen K E- S...Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Myers. Joel H Ph Waynesboro Beta Theta Pi House. 

Newman, Euther E E. S... Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Park, Elda R E.S...EaPark 150 W. Pomfret. 

Paterson, R. Bruce E. S... Clearfield 19 W. C. 

Peters, Eva E.S... Uriah 265 W. Pomfret. 

Reddig, C. Mansfield E- S... Carlisle 132 E- Main. 

Reindollar, E. Eugene Ph Taneytown, Md Phi Delta Theta House. 

Rinehart, Kathryn S E. S... Spring City 271 W. South. 

Rinker, Edith S C Carlisle 335 N. Hanover 

Robinson, Mary B E. S... Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

Selby, Howard W Sc Philadelphia 2 W. C. 

Sharp, W. Howard Ph.... Vineland, N. J..Kappa Sigma House 

Shuck, Joseph M C Greencastle 36 K. C. 

Sinclair, Joseph C C Baltimore, Md 2 S. C. 

Smith, W. Moffett C Jamesburg, N. J 2 W. C, 

Suavely, Herman J Ph Steeltou 21 K. C. 

Spangler, C. Merle E. S... Greencastle ; 2 w. C. 

Bpeece, Newton W l'h Speeceville Kappa Sigma House. 

Stein, Norman Lt I*h Orwigaburg 19 W. C. 

Tatnal, lviith M E. S... Harrisburg Harriaburg. 

Thompson, M.nv McG L. S... Carlisle 261 W. Louther. 

Thrush, George A Ph Lewistown 19 K C, 

Treibley, Flo M E. S... Carlisle i. H, 

Van Hook, Carlton R E. S...Millville, N. J... Kappa Sigma House. 

West, P. Bar! L. S...Mitlville, Del l w. C, 

Whistler, Bdward L C Carlisle 123 8. West. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 141 

Wilson, Maude E F. S... Brooklyn, N. Y F. H. 

Wise, Mervin B F. S.. .Carlisle 364 W. North. 



PRESMMEIN. 

Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Ahl, George W Ph Carlisle 267 S. Hanover. 

Ahl, John C F. S... Carlisle 267 S. Hanover. 

Allen, Lee Rogers P Carlisle 31 S. Pitt. 

Auman, Lester W C Mifflintown 24 W. C. 

Bachman, Frederick H F. S...Hazleton 7 E. C. 

Barnitz, George W Sc Carlisle 131 E. Main. 

Bigham, Ruth H Sp Gettysburg L,. H. 

Blair, Jeannette S P Carlisle 118 S. Hanover. 

Bradley, Agnes F F. S...Birdsboro F. H. 

Brady, A. Corbin. F. S... Atlantic City, N. J 28 E. C. 

Brame, E.Grace C Carlisle 47 E. North. 

Brenneman, Foster F F.S... Carlisle 430 N. Hanover. 

Brenneman, John E F.S...Wellsville 9 E. C. 

Briuton, Thomas B C Christiana IS. C. 

Brosius, Warren A Sc Atglen 25 W. C. 

Brown, J. Paul Sp Wyoming, Del 4 E- C. 

Brumbaugh, Harry F Ph Greencastle 25 W. C. 

Bryson, S. Russell F.S...Mauch Chunk 20 F. C. 

Bunting, Frank C F.S... Marion Station, Md 18 F. C. 

Carroll, J. Russell Ph Federalsburgr, Md Sigma Alpha Ep. House. 

Carruthers, Donald W C Carlisle 261 W. Fouther. 

Claster, Joel... Ph Lock Haven , 15 W. C. 

Cole, Clarence F., Jr F. S... Atlantic City, N. J 16 W. C. 

Cook, Jay D F.S... Carlisle 57 S. College. 

Corbin, J. Harrison Ph Altoona Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Corson, Forrest B C Philadelphia 28 E- C. 

Coyle, Mary F F. S... Carlisle "Bonnie View." 

Cunningham, Daniel W. C Ph Fnid Beta Th eta Pi House 

Davis, J. Steward L. S...Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Day, Margaret R F- S...Port Norris, N. J F- H. 

Day, S. Thomas, Jr F. S... Port Norris, N. J... Kappa Sig-ma House. 

Dean, I. Stanley C Altoona 230 W. South. 

Deitz, George C C Mechanicsburg 9. F. C. 

Dunn, Francis A Ph Wilkes-Barre... Surma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Farp, Carlyle R Sp Flk Ridge, Md 15 F. C. 

Fdelstein, Fugene F F. S...Fansford Sigma Chi House. 

Elliott, Matilda S Sp Carlisle 425 N. Hanover. 



142 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Emmert, George W., Jr Sp York Springs... Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

English, Marguerite E. S... Camden, N. J L,. H. 

Fineberg, Nathan F L. S...Altoona Beta Theta Pi House. 

Finton, Iva C Harrisburg 635 S. Hanover. 

Ford, Thomas H E. S...Minersville 12 E. C. 

Fox, J. Harold E.S... Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Frantz, E. Harold L,. S... Reading 23 E. C. 

Frendlich. J. Cameron Ph Atlantic City, N. J Kappa Sigma House. 

Geissinger, E. Eamont C Tamaqua Alpha Chi Rbo House. 

Getter, G. Marie Sp Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Gooding, Addison M E.S... Steamboat Springs, Col 37 S. C. 

Gross, Russell C C Philadelphia 31 W. C. 

Handwork, Cora E E. S...Birdsboro L. H. 

Hearn, Walter A C Edelman 38 E. C. 

Hertzler, Joseph E Sc Eoysville 4 S. C. 

Hewitt, J. Morris Ph Camden, N.J. ..Kappa Sigma House. 

Hicks, H. Cheston C Williamsport 29 W. C. 

Hughes, Clyde M C Carlisle 458 N. West. 

Irvin, Nora E Ph Steelton 243 W. Pomfret. 

Jackson, J. Roy Ph New Buffalo. ..Beta Theta Pi House. 

Jaggers, Frank Y C Philadelphia 14 E. C. 

Johnson, Martha E P Mt. Carmel E. H. 

Jones, James A Ph Baltimore, Md....Sisrma Alpha Ep. House. 

Karper, Leslie M Ph Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

King, Vincent E Sp Shelter Island, N. Y 148 S. Pitt. 

Krall, Mabel E Ph Harrisburg 125 Walnut. 

Kuller, Franklin A C Alinda 1 S. C. 

Eamborn, Louis E Ph Baltimore, Md Kappa Sigma douse 

Langfitt, Helen R E. S... Pittsburg E. H. 

Eedden, Roy Sc Haleyville, N. J 47 E. C. 

Mapes, Eugenia M Ph Carlisle 249 W. Eouther. 

Marshall, Raymond E Ph Mi 11 burn, X. J 32 K. C. 

Marsland, Irving A C Port Washington, N. Y 18 K. C, 

Mathis, W. Ivins Sc Camden, N. .1 Kappa Blgma Route. 

McEHish, Russel C C Chaneyavllle Kappa Sigma Kouee. 

Mcintosh, Elton M Sp DuBoia Sl*ma alpha Bpailoa Houae, 

McKoc, ClaraM I' EXaajeratown, Md E. H. 

Meily, Joseph E. S...Mcchanicsburg Median irshurg. 

Miller, Clinton II L. S... Sinking Spring 45 1.. Ci 

Miller, John K Sp Marietta M w. C, 

Miller, Uauri EQ C Ulentown 10(> s. Weat. 

Mish, liar, v S|» Ittinkn Hill. W. V.i 24 BD, C, 

M<,hi. i. ETred U C Carliala 127 s. c 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 143 

Mohler, Samuel L C Carlisle 127 S. C. 

Morgan, Margaret H C Carlisle 243 W. Eouther. 

Mowery, R. Bruce Sp Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Moyer, Ralph H Sp Millersburg 6 E. C. 

Nagay, Adam *. C W. Pittston 16 Conway Hall. 

Niesley, Marie C Carlisle 227 W. Pomfret, 

Park, Marian H E. S...Ea Park 150 W. Pomfret, 

Rice, Jesse S Ph New Bloomfield 318 N. College. 

Rigdon, Henry Sc Sharon, Md 4. E. C. 

Ring, A. H. Bartel P Carlisle 34 S. West. 

Robinson, William H C Philadelphia 14 E. C. 

Rockmaker, Hyman C Hazleton 7 E. C. 

Rockwell, Emory B E. S...Wellsboro Beta Theta Pi House. 

Rue, Edgar H C Waynesboro 20 W. C. 

Saul, Mary M E. S... Harrisburg Harrisburg. 

Searight, Clarence Eee Ph Boiling Springs Boiling Springs. 

Shepler, William H Ph Carlisle 221 W. Eouther. 

Shoecraft, Eugene C Sp St. Joseph, Mo 27 W. C. 

Sieber, D. Ralph Ph Reedsville 12 E. C. 

Smarsh, John A E. S...Chambersburg Chambersburg. 

Smith, Charles M Sp Eaurel, Del 18 E. C. 

Smith, Marian Ruth E. S...Royersford E. H. 

Sperow, Wilson P C Martinsburg, W. Va 33 E. C. 

Stauffer, H. Eauretta E. S...Eancaster E. H. 

Steel, Charles C P Williamsburg Phi Delta Theta House. 

Stetler, Roy H Sp Berwick 22 W. C. 

Stickell, Donald C E.S... Waynesboro 27 W. C. 

Strock, Florence E C Carlisle 337 N. Hanover. 

Stuart, Harriet H E.S... Carlisle 136 E. High. 

Thompson, Margaret M C Carlisle 261 W. Eouther. 

Thompson, Mary M C Carlisle 442 N. West. 

Thompson, Rebecca C Carlisle 259 W. Eouther. 

Tilton, J. Warren Ph Hammonton, N. J 5 S. C. 

Tyson, Fred. A Ph Philadelphia. ..Kappa Sigma House. 

Van Siclen, Clinton DeWitt...E. S...Bayside, N. Y 5 S. C. 

Wagner, Charles E E.S...Eock Haven 31 W. C. 

Williams, Clyde M E.S...Shepherdstown, W. Va 33 E. C. 

Wilson. Francis G E.S. ..Harrisburg 11 W. C. 

Wise, Victor C Ph Williamsport 29 W. C. 

Zimmerman, Helen B P Eberley's Mills Eberley's Mills, 

Zorger, Clarence E Sp Harrisburg Harrisburg. 



144 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SUMMARY. 

Graduate Students 24 

Seniors 67 

Jun iors « 66 

Sophomores 74 

Freshmen 120 

Total 351 



DISTRIBUTION BY STATES. 



Pennsylvania 269 Connecticut 

New Jersey 29 ^Alabama 

Maryland 24 ^ District of Columbia 

Delaware 10 Missouri 

New York 7 Massachusetts 

West Virginia ... 4 * Colorado 

Canada 1 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 145 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Name. Residence. Room. 

Barnitz, Edwin Elder Carlisle 131 E.Main. 

Barrett, Jerome Kelly Scranton 101 W. Eouther. 

Brennan, Daniel Edward Shenandoah....Theta Eambda Phi House. 

Buckley, Bayard Lanning Philadelphia Delta Chi House. 

Cook, Scott Harrison Carlisle 57 S. College. 

Dipple, Walter EeRoy Wilkinsburg Sigma Chi House. 

Felton, Holden Stanley Everett 31 S. C. 

Foley, Patrick Charles Rendham 102 S. West. 

Gilbert, Richard Henry, Jr Berwick Sigma Chi House. 

Hankee, Robert Warren Slatington...Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Hicks, William Gorgas Harrisburg Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Houseman, William F Steelton 14 W. C. 

Jackson, John R Akersville Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Eocuta, Joseph Caesar Dupont 122 S. West. 

Morgan, Gomer W Kingston Y. M. C. A. Bld'g. 

Parsons, Irving Paul Atlantic City, N. J 29 E. C. 

Redding, Daniel J Juniata 238 S. West. 

Reichelderfer, Clinton Alfred. .Trexlertown...Theta Eambda Phi House. 

Savidge, Preston Mettler Sunbury Delta Chi House. 

Smith, Ralph Ewing Bloomsburg 260 S. West. 

Strauss, William S. Bethlehem. ..Theta Eambda Phi House. 

Umbenhauer,EeRoyPotteiger Reading 31 E. Pomfret. 

Wohl, Benjamin Harrison Scalp Eevel ....Theta Eambda Phi House. 

Yarnall, Joseph Olan California Delta Chi House. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Name. Residence. Room. 

Badger, Frederick Preston Jermyn 275 W. Eouther. 

Best, Robert Edward Jeannette Delta Chi House. 

Challis, Robert Reese Wilkes-Barre 36 N. Hanover. 

Conway, James Francis Philadelphia Delta Chi House. 

Dickson, Clark Eong ....Berwick Delta Chi House. 

Edwards, Alison Eee Carlisle 64 S. West. 

Exendine, Albert Andrew Eookeba, Okla Y. M. C. A. Bld'g. 

Fritz, Harold Delano Theta Eambda Phi House. 

Graupner, William Frederick. .Harrisburg..Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Eandis, James Blaine Berlin Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Eong, Florence E Flemington Eloyd Hall. 

McKinney, John Hudson Franklin Theta Eambda Phi House. 



146 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Marianelli,Emilio Plainsville Theta Eatnbda Phi House. 

Marshall, George Bishop Glassboro, N. J Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Mendelsohn, Benjamin Scranton 133 S. Hanover. 

O'Brien, Charles Nanticoke Y. M. C. A. Bld'g. 

Puderbaugh, Robert James. ..El Dorado Sigma Chi House. 

Rooke, James Joplin Peckville Delta Chi House. 

Smith, Roscoe Blaine Wilkes-Barre Delta Chi House. 

Stafford, Elbert Wesley Easton, Md..Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Stevenson, George Bond Lock Haven Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Underwood, Charles Vincent. .Scranton Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Warrington, James Otis Georgetown, Del Sigma Chi House. 

Watkins, Norman Conrad Minersville 64 S. West. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Name. Residence. Room. 

Andrus, Fred E Ralston 18 W. C. 

Beard, William M Williamsport, Md 23 E. C. 

Beaven, Walter C Port Deposit, Md Beta Theta Pi House. 

Biddle, David H Mechanicsburg 16 W. C. 

Black, William S Chambersburg Beta Theta Pi House. 

Blanning, Wendell Y Williamstown 44 E- P. 

Bullock, Russell E E. Mauch Chunk 22 E. C. 

Burd, William Harrison Cresscn 64 S. West. 

Cleaver, C. EeRoy Mt. Carmel 14 W. C 

Dorcus, Edwin S Port Deposit, Md 30 E. C. 

Dorn, Stacy Byron Bradford Theta Lambda Phi House. 

Dughi, Massimo Vincent Eewistown 57 S. College. 

Durkin, James Ambrose Girardville 154 W. Pomfret. 

Einstein, Robert S Carlisle 133 S. Pitt. 

Eitzel, Howard S Reading 21 E. C. 

Evans, Stanley Marshall Olyphaut 170 W. Pomfret 

Fry, Clarence A Harrisburg Kappa Sigma House. 

Gish, Harvy O Middletown 18 W. C, 

Grlauser, Willis K Newville Newville. 

Hall, John A. F HarrUburg ll W 

Hemphill, John II UtOOOa Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Hertzler, RnMell C HarrUtrarg 20 \\\ c. 

Hoch, Harrj K Woodeide, Del <> 8 B. c. 

Etolliater, Joseph Bamuel Locust Qap Ml s. West. 

Bughee, James H., J r I'Ylton. Del \lpha Chi RhO H'Mis,'. 

J.h k-on, -I.i iii« Kemi. v I l.i i ii iDUrg 256 W. Pomh et. 

Konnt/., Ambrose Kdward l'ittsbur^ Si^ma Chi HouSC 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 147 

Locke, Joseph Leo Dupont 122 S. West. 

Lodge, Charles M Crystal Spring..Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Loeser, Harry R Harrisburg Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Long, E. Walter Delmar, DeL.Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Lorenz, R. Donald Roaring Springs... Phi Delta Theta House. 

McCall, Lisle D DuBois 832 N. West. 

Macklin, George T Milford, Del Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Martin, Thompson S West Fairview... Phi Kappa Sigma House. 

Miller, Thomas B Plymouth Sigma Alpha Epsilon House. 

Myers, John Eyster Camp Hill 19 E. C. 

Narcowich, Bryan Standley....Gilberton Theta Lambda Phi House. 

O'Hara, Reuben Brubaker Carlisle 329 N. Hanover. 

Peppets, Joseph Adam Pittston Theta Lambda Phi House. 

Renn, Paul R Sunbury Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Rickles, Samuel Leon Wilkes-Barre... Theta Lambda Phi House. 

Rogers, Howard Sadler Athens Delta Chi House. 

Routh, Robert Los Angeles, Cal Delta Chi House. 

Saul, Herman H Reading 302 W. Main. 

Schaeffer, Lloyd Merkel.. Fleetwood 302 W. Main. 

Scott, Ralph R Washington....Theta Lambda Phi House. 

Shields, Richard A Morrisdale Mines 13 E. C. 

Smith, Ray P Carlisle 80S N. West. 

Sohn, Walter R Harrisburg Alpha Chi Rho House. 

Spotts, Harris Alvin Muncy 57 S. College. 

Stauffer, S. Walter Walkersville,Md..Sigma Alpha Ep. House. 

Steckel, Harvey H Slatington 6-8 S. C. 

Storey, Henry Wilson Johnstown Phi Kappa Psi House. 

Strite. Edwin D Chambersburg.. 31 W. C. 

Stugart, Seth Taylor Carlisle 45 S. West. 

Todd, Glenn E Carlisle South & Pitt. 

VanBlarcom, Martin Paterson, N. J 37 S. C. 

Wilson, Joseph Carson Bradford 271 W. South. 

Wallace, David Waddell Wilkes-Barre Sigma Alpha Ep. House. 

Westover, Joseph Harrison Spangler 64 S. West. 

Waldman, William Milton Wilkes-Barre 218 S. Hanover. 

Woodcock, John Holidaysburg Delta Chi House. 

SUMMARY. 

Senior Class 24 

Middle Class 24 

Junior Class 63 

111 

DISTRIBUTION BY STATES. 

Pennsylvania 96 New Jersey 3 

Delaware 5 California 1 

Maryland 5 Oklahoma 1 



148 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



CONWAY HALL. 

C. — Classical Course. 

L. S. — Latin-Scientific Course. 

S. — Scientific Course. 

Com. — Commercial Course. 

C. H.— Conway Hall. 

Where no other state is mentioned, residence is in Pennsylvania. 

fOURTM FORM. 

Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Behney, Chalmers Bert L.S... Carlisle 121 E. Main. 

Bouton, Arthur Alonzo C Brooklyn, N. Y C. H. 

Buczko, John Mark S Mt. Carmel C. H. 

Cardon, Bruce Reginald L. S... Clearfield C. H. 

Coffman, David Ray C Scotland Scotland. 

Connelly, Frank Leyland S Carlisle 120 W. Main- 

Deeter, Jasper Newton, Jr L. S ..Harrisburg C. H. 

Elzey, Roland Carl L. S...Seaford, Del C. H. 

Ferrer, Francisco Jose S Consolacian del Sur, Cuba C. H. 

Garling, Harold S L. S...Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

Ginter, William Coyle L. S... Carlisle Carlisle. 

Graham, Mary L. S... Carlisle 172 W. Main. 

Hollinger, Frank James S Carlisle 304 S. Pitt. 

Horn, Clark P L. S... Donaldson C. H. 

Hukill, George Raymond L. S...Middletown, Del C. H. 

Johnston, Samuel Richard S Carlisle C. H. 

Lewis, Charles Frederick L. S... Sugar Notch C. H. 

Lorenzo, Pascasio S Sagua la Granda, Cuba C. H. 

Martin, William Hope S Carlisle W. North. 

McAnney, Lorraine Yeoman. .C Carlisle C. H, 

McGrath, Joseph A L. S ..Falls Creek C. H. 

Morgan, Hugh Curran C Carlisle 243 W. Louther. 

Mum in a, Frank Baseshore Com.. Median icsburg Mechanics burg. 

Ottcy, A bra m Carter Parr C Newtown Square C. H. 

Parsons, John Willets L.S ..Atlantic City. N. J C. H. 

Pendel, Paul Bdward L.S...Throop C. H. 

Sadler, Richard Watson L. S... Carlisle :2 < > Walnut. 

Slater, Robert Johnson L.S. ..Warren, Ohio C, n 

Smith, John Raymond s Wellaboro C. H, 

Vaughn, J. Oldfield s Rojenford C, B« 

Weidenmeyer, Ruth Cecelia.. . L. S. Carlisle 1020 N. Weat, 

Woltnian, St. u. nt Croll L. H ...York C II. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 149 

THIRD PORM. 

Name. Course. Residence. Room. 

Adams, George W E. S... Baltimore, Md C. H. 

Bietsch, Frederick P S Chambersburg Chambersburg. 

Blanning, Charles F S Williamstown C. H. 

Boss, Edward Carlyle E. S... Washington, D. C C. H. 

Briggs, William Arthur S Carlisle 45 E. North. 

Buckwalter, Edgar W E.S...Eeola C. H. 

Cabrera, Ignacio S Havana, Cuba C. H. 

Care, Clement Brooke E.S...Einglestown C. H. 

Colon, Carmelo E.S...Arecibo, P. R C. H. 

Contel, Julio Esclusa S Orizaba, Mexico C. H. 

Davis, Vernon James E. S.. .White Earth, Minn..u. S. Indian School. 

Foreman, Robert Jay Com. .Carlisle 624 S. Hanover. 

Goldstein, Hy man E.S... Portage C. H. 

Goodhart, Charles Merion E. S...Shippensburg Shippensburg. 

Griffiths, George Raymond. ..E.S...Nesquehoning C. H. 

Grimm, John Fulton E. S...Newville Newville. 

Groome, Walter Gerald E. S... Portage C. H. 

Hitchens, Eivingston S Carlisle W. South. 

Houtz, William Markley S Harrisburg C. H. 

Hudnell, Eeonard Hyde E. S... Las Animas, Colo U. S. Indian School. 

Huston, William C S Coatesville C. H. 

Kachel, William H S Pottstown C. H. 

Kell, Cornelius S Blain C. H. 

Eenahan, John F., Jr E. S...Wilkes-Barre C. H. 

Eine, Eeroy Z S Carlisle 261 Arch. 

Mowbray, Raymond Luther. .. E. S... Cambridge, Md C. H. 

Noble, William F. D S Shippensburg C. H. 

Otto, Elias Hertman E. S... Boiling Springs. ...Boiling Springs. 

Pleam, Charles Eloyd S Marietta C. H. 

Prowse, Charles Harris ...C Cornwall, England C. H. 

Renard, Eouis E E. S...Scranton C. H. 

Rippman, Charles E E. S...Millerstown C. H. 

Royer, Eawrence G E. S...Piqua, Ohio C. H. 

Rupp, David Mohler C Shiremanstown Shiremanstown. 

Shelley, John E. S...Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Strominger, Troup Chester.. ..E. S... Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Thorn, Edgar Allen Sc .. .Martinsburg, W. Va C. H. 

Tonkin, Henry M E.S. .Millington, Md C. H. 

Trego, Elmer Edwin S Carlisle 77 W. Eouther. 

Walls, James Alonzo E.S. ..Philadelphia C. H. 

Weihenmayer,EdmundWakling.S...Hagerstown, Md C. H. 



150 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Whiting, Lawrence D L.S... Carlisle 265 W. Pomfret. 

Zullinger, George Stauffer Sc Chambersburg C. H. 

SECOND PORM. 

Name. Residence;. Room. 

Ahl, Parker V Boiling Springs Boiling Springs. 

Armstrong, Jackson B Philadelphia C. H. 

Buczko, Andrew B Mt. Carmel C. H. 

Chamberlain, Boyd D Shamokin C. H. 

Corn well, Clark Lewis Waterbury, Conn C. H. 

Crease, Nicholas Hazleton C. H. 

Diver, James Harold Pennsgrove, N. J C. H. 

Gannon, Thomas J Orange, N. J C. H. 

*Goodhart, Fred E Allen Allen. 

Hubbard, William T East New Market, Md C. H. 

Ledy, William Joseph Marion C. H. 

Lenahan, Stephen W Wilkes-Barre C. H. 

Lerch, John Byers Coatesville C. H. 

Mackert, Frank M Sunbury C. H. 

McCaleb, William T Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Mohler, Nora May Carlisle 127 S. College. 

Orris, Emery Clyde Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg. 

Pepper, Carlton David Georgetown, Del C. H. 

Prather, Perry Franklin Clear Spring, Md C. H. 

Price, Lee Coston Centreville, Md C. H. 

Price, Robert Centreville, Md C. H. 

Rebok, Norman Zinn Carlisle 151 W. Pomfret. 

Reeser, John Bentz Camp Hill Camp Hill. 

Rose, Louis E East Stroudsburg C. H. 

Ruch, Robert Edwin Carlisle 173 E. Loutlu r. 

Rupp, George Francis Shiremanatowu Shiremanstown. 

Shearer, Joseph B Carlisle "Idlewilde". 

Shearer, Rippey Carlisle "Idlewilde". 

Shelley, Daniel B Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg*. 

Smith, Aivin Pennsgrove, N. J C. H. 

Splicer, Angus Carlisle Q. S. Indian School. 

Stugai 1, William a Carlisle Carlisle. 

Tabler, Carlton LeFevre Martinsburg, w. Vs C H. 

Whiting, Russell Carlisle 265 W. Pomfret. 

Wbgau, ( hi y Grreas Carlisle E. Main. 

Fork, Joseph F Mt. Carmel C, M. 

♦spiint- Term, 10. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 151 

PIRST PORM. 

Name. Residence. Room. 

Ambrose, Peter Mt. Carmel C. H. 

Casanovas, John R Baracoa, Cuba C. H. 

Hutchison, Paul Loomis Carlisle W. Main. 

Kirkley, Edward T., Jr Baltimore, Md C. H. 

Lindner, John Austin Carlisle 28 S. College. 

Livingston, Frank Nanticoke C. H. 

Morrow, John Weeby Red Bank, N. J C. H. 

Rendon, Philip Merida, Yucatan, Mexico C. H. 

Reyes, Juventius Puebla, Mexico C. H. 

Russell, Richard Herr Mt. Holly Springrs, "Holly Inn," Mt. Holly Springs. 

Stooks, Leon Nanticoke C. H. 

Thomas, Emrys Nanticoke C. H. 

Tims, George P Carlisle Carlisle. 

SUMMARY. 

Fourth Form 32 

Third Form 43 

Second Form 36 

First Form 13 

Total 124 

DISTRIBUTION OP CONWAY MALL STUDENTS 
BY STATES. 

Pennsylvania 89 West Virginia 2 

Maryland 9 New York 1 

New Jersey 5 District of Columbia 1 

Cuba 4 Minnesota 1 

Delaware 3 Porto Rico 1 

Mexico 3 Colorado I 

Ohio 2 Connecticut 1 

England 1 

SUMMARY OP ALL STUDENTS 

College 351 

School of Law (less College Fylectives, 34) 77 

Conway Hall 124 

Total 552 



152 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



DISTRIBUTION OP ALL STUDENTS BY STATES. 



Pennsylvania 428 

New Jersey 36 

Maryland 34 

Delaware 

New York 

West Virginia 

Cuba 

Connecticut 

Mexico 

District of Columbia 

England. 



15 
8 
6 
4 
3 
3 
2 



Ohio 2 

Colorado 2 

Alabama 

Missouri 

Massachusetts 

California 

Oklahoma 

Minnesota 

Porto Rico 

Canada 

1 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



153 



INDEX 



College page 

Admission 30 

Admission by Certificate 30 

Admission on Examination 31 

Alumni Associations 71, 72 

Alumni Statistics 16 

Astronomy 55 

Athletic Field 63 

Beneficiary Fund 79 

Bible, English, and Evidences 50 

Bills, College 66 

Biology 49 

Business Institutions 60 

Calendar for 1910-1911 2 

Calendar, College 3 

Certificates 31 

Charter 7 

Chemistry 49 

Commencement, Honors of 28 

Commons, College 64 

Courses of Study 29 

Damages 68 

Degrees 65 

Degrees Conferred, 1910 26 

Education 57 

Examinations. 64 

Faculties 21 

Faculty, College 21, 22 

Faculty School of Law 23 

Faculty, Conway Hall 23 

Faculty, Special Staff 24 

Faculty, Committees 24 

Geology 52 

German 52 

Government and Discipline 65 

Gowns, Hoods, and Caps 68 

Greek 53 

Grounds and Buildings 61 

Heating of Buildings 63 

History S3 

Hospital 64 

Latin 54 

Libraries and Reading Room 64 



College page 

Literature, English and American..51 

Material Equipment 61 

Mathematics 55 

Methods of Instruction 47-49 

Museum 52 

Music, History and Theory of 56 

Observatory 55 

Oratory 56 

Organizations, College 69-75 

Order of Studies 35 

Freshman Class 35, 36 

Sophomore Class 37-39 

Junior Class 40-43 

Senior Class 44-46 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 70 

Philosophy 57 

Physical Training 61 

Physics 58 

Political Science 53 

Prizes and Scholarships 75-83 

Prizes, Special 79 

Register of Students 135 

Regulations, General 64 

Rhetoric and the English 

Language 59 

Romance Language ••••60 

Rooms 67 

vScheme of Recitation 47, 48 

.Scholarships Endowed 83 

Social Problems 60 

Trustees, Board of 17-19 

Trustees, Officers of Board 19 

Trustees, Executive Committee 19 

Trustees, Investment Committee 20 

Trustees, Standing Committees 20 

Visitors 25 

Worship, Public 65 

Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion 69 

Law, School of 

Admission of Students % 

Admission to the Bar 100 



154 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Law, School of PAGE 

Alumni Association, Officers of 98 

Course of Instruction 93, 94 

Court Privileges 99 

Courts of Cumberland Co., Rules-102 

Degrees 99 

Degrees Conferred, 1910 92 

Establishment 88 

Examinations 98 

Expenses 100 

Faculty 91 

Incorporators 89, 90 

Library 98 

Material Equipment 98 

Methods of Instruction 94 

Officers of the Corporation 90 

Offices and Moot Courts 95 

Privileges, Special 99 

Register of Students 145 

Registration in Pennsylvania 96-98 

Regulations, General 103 

Site of School 99 

Supreme Court, Rule of 100-102 

Terms and Vacations 100 

Conway Hall (Preparatory School). 

Admission 122 

Admission to College 123 

Annex 122 

Athletic Field 126 

Athletics 127 

Boarding 123 

Calender, School 108 

Commencement Honors 112 

Conway Hall 121 

Courses of Study 113-116, 123 

Course in Commerce 116, 117 

Dining Hall 122 

Diplomas 123 



Conway Hall (Preparatory School) . page 

Diplomas Conferred 112 

English 117 

Executive Committee of Board of 

Trustees 110 

Expenses 124, 125 

Faculty Ill 

Greek 118 

Gymnasium 125 

Historical Note 109 

History 118 

Hospital 125 

Infirmary, School 122 

Latin 118 

Lectures 127 

Library and Reading Room 127 

Literary Societies 127 

Location 129 

Mathematics 119 

Matron 122 

Methods of Instruction 117 

Modern Lauguag-es 120 

Organizations 127 

Outfit 129 

Prizes 129 

Public Speakinjr 120 

Register of Students 1 18 

Reports L30 

Rooms 130 

Rules and Regulations L30 

Scholarships- 129 

Science 120 

Study Hall 130 

Supervision 131 

units Required For Graduation 121 

young Men's Christian \sso»-ia 

lion 128 



r ol. VII 



tmmson College 
bulletin 



MAY, 1912 



No. 1 



The Catalogue 

1911-1912 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY — MAY — JULY 
NOVEMBER 



Enured as second-class matter January 19. 1906, at the postoffice at Carlisle. Pa. 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



a 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



CATALOGUE OF 

Btcfctnsott College 



1911-1912 

Of TH£ 

fin 'vmttTV OP M t JNOI& 

129th Annual Session 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MDCCCCXII 



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COLLEGE CALENDAR— 1911-1912 



FALL TERM— 1911 

September 13, Wednesday Entrance examination. 

September 14, Thursday Fall Term begins. 

September 15, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

November 30, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 21, Thursday, 12.30 p.m.. . Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM— 1912 

January 3, Wednesday, 8.15 a.m. . . .Winter Term begins. 

January 10-27 Week of Prayer in College. 

February 8, Thursday Inter-Society Debate. 

February 22, Thursday Washington's Birthday Celebration. 

February 23, Friday Freshman Contest for Miller and 

Walkley Prizes. 
March 1, Friday Intercollegiate Debates with Swarth- 

more. 
March 15, Friday, 10.30 a.m Winter Term ends. 

SPRING TERM— 1912 

March 26, Tuesday, 8.15 a.m Spring Term begins. 

April 8, Monday Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest 

with Swarthmore. 

April 25, Friday Sophomore Oratorical Contest of the 

Belles Lettres and Union Philo- 
sophical Literary Societies. 

May 1 1— 16 Senior final examinations. 

May 20-25 Final examinations of the Junior, 

Sophomore, and Freshman classes. 

May 24, Friday, 8 p.m Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 

Prizes. 

May 25, Saturday, 8 p.m Commencement play by Dramatic 

Club: "Shakespeare's Tempest." 

May 26, Sunday, 1 1 a.m Baccalaureate sermon by President 

Noble. 

6.30 p.m Campus praise service. 

7.30 p.m Address before the College Christian 

Associations. 

(5) 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SPRING TERM— 1912. continued 

May 27, Monday, 9.30 a.m Commencement exercises of Conway 

Hall, School for Boys. 

2 p.m Senior Class Day exercises. 

4 p.m Annual meeting of the Incorporators 

of the School of Law. 

7 p.m Annual meeting of the Trustees of the 

College. 

8 p.m Concert by the musical organizations 

of the College. 

10 p.m Junior Promenade — campus. 

May 28, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Meeting of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

9.30 a.m Class reunions. 

10.30 a.m Alumni Association meetings. 

2 p.m Inauguration of Eugene Allen Noble 

as President of the College. 

8-1 1 p.m President's Reception. 

May 29, Wednesday, 8.15 a.m Class advancements, following Col- 
lege Chapel. 
9.30 a.m Commencement exercises of the Col- 
lege and School of Law. 
12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 

FALL TERM— 1912 

September 18, Wednesday Examinations for admission. 

September 19, Thursday Fall Term begins. 

December 20, Friday Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM— 1913 
January 2, Thursday, 8.15 a.m Winter Term begins. 






ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total.. c Al , 

Legal profession 5 ' 4 

Ministry '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. I,04 ° 

Physicians and dentists ' 9 °o 

Editors and journalists 4 ° 

Financial and mercantile pursuits 

Agricultural pursuits 52 ° 

President of the United States 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 

Judges of Federal Courts 

United States Cabinet Officers . 

Ministers to Foreign Governments . ? 

United States Consuls 

United States Senators ' I2 

Members of Congress I0 

Officers of the Army 5 * 

Officers of the Navy 23 ? 

Governors of States 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 

Attorney-Generals of States . . o 

Secretaries of Commonwealths ? 

Chancellors of States \\ 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts.. ............ \ 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts. . '. . . . .... 

Judges of lower courts " " if 

State Senators . 

Members of State Assemblies 39 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church ^ 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church . . 

Presidents of colleges 

Heads of professional schools 

Professors in colleges I0 

Superintendents of schools ' Jl 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools '.'. 2fift 

Instructors in lower-grade schools "" ," 

terently preserved, and as it was last revised more than one year ago. 

(7) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., Ex-ojjicio. 

REPRESENTATIVES-AT-LARGE 
FRANK C. BOSLER Carlisle 

(Term will expire 191 3). 

Gen. HORATIO C. KING, LL.D .Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

JOHN A. SECOR New York City 

(Term will expire 191 5). 

WILLIAM D. BOYER, Esq Scranton 

(Term will expire 191 5). 

REPRESENTATIVES OF BALTIMORE DISTRICT 
Rev. Bishop LUTHER B. WILSON, D.D., LL.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 191 3). • 

THOMAS C. SMITH, M.D Washington, D. C. 

(Term will expire 19 15). 

Rev. LUTHER T. WIDERMAN, D.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915). 

Rev. DAVID H. CARROLL, D.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 19 13). 

HENRY M. WILSON, M.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expire 1913). 

J. HENRY BAKER, Esq Baltimore. Md. 

(Term will expire 19 14). 

ISAAC McCURLEY, Esq Baltimore, Md 

(Term will expire 191 5). 

REPRESENTATIVES OF PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT 
Rev. ERANK B. LYN( H, D.D Philadelphia 

( 1 < r in will expire 191 2). 

I Ion. I I SI II M. SI IAW Philadelphia 

1 1 c 1 in mil expire "j i i I. 

Rev. WI1 1. 1 AM L BOSWELL, l).l> Philadelphia 

Mil 111 will 1 \|iii<- 1915). 

CHARLES K. /1 (,. 1 bq Philadelphia 

(Term will expin 1913)1 

(S) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 9 

REPRESENTATIVES OF PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT, continued 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

Rev. FRANKLIN F. BOND, D.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 19 12). 

BOYD LEE SPAHR, Esq Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

REPRESENTATIVES OF CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 
DISTRICT 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE Carlisle 

(Term will expire 19 13). 

JOHN P. MELICK Harrisburg 

(Term will expire 1913)- 

JOSEPH J. BAUGHMAN New Cumberland 

(Term will expire 1913)- 

JOHN S. BURSK Carlisle 

(Term will expire 19 14)- 

Rev. WILLIAM W. EVANS, D.D Washington, D.C 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

Rev. WILLIAM A. STEPHENS, D.D Carlisle 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

C. PRICE SPEER Chambersburg 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, Jr., Esq Carlisle 

(Term will expire 191 4-) 

WILLIAM L. WOODCOCK, Esq -. Altoona 

(Term will expire 19 12). 

REPRESENTATIVES OF NEW JERSEY DISTRICT 
Hon. EDWARD C. STOKES Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1915)- 

*Rev. BENJ. C. LIPPINCOTT, D.D Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Rev. WILLIAM P. DAVIS, D.D. Salem, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1913)- 

Rev. GEORGE B. WIGHT, D.D Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1913)- 

Gen. JAMES F. RUSLING, LL.D Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 19 12). 

GEORGE D. CHENOWETH, Sc.D Woodbury, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1915)- 
*Deceased. 



10 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

REPRESENTATIVES OF WILMINGTON DISTRICT 
MELVILLE GAMBRILL Wilmington, Del. 

(Term will expire 19 12). 

Rev. THOMAS E. MARTINDALE, D.D Salisbury, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915)- 

Rev. CORNELIUS W. PRETTYMAN, D.D Snow Hill, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915)- 

JOSEPH E. HOLLAND Milford, Del. 

(Term will expire 19 15). 

Rev. LOUIS E. BARRETT, D.D Chestertown, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915)- 

CHARLES B. PRETTYMAN Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1915). 

Hon. ROBLEY D.JONES Snow Hill, Md. 

(Term will expire 1914)- 

REPRESENTATIVES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 
PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT 

IARLES J. HEPBURN, Esq Philadelphia 

I I (i in w ill expire 1912). 

BALTIMORE DISTRICT 

(,. I AM I AM Villi I , M.D Baltimore, \ld. 

(Term \\ ill expire i<> 1 $). 

CARLISLE DISTRICT 

I lAKin I. HUBER, Esq Brooklyn, N. Y. 

i 1 1 1 in v, ill expire hji 5). 

WILMINGTON DISTRICT 

III NIO P. ( ANNON Bridgeville, Del. 

(Term will expiri 

01 1 ICERS OF THE BOARD 

I in I'ki 11. 1 .1 01 mi Colli gi . President. 

William \\ . I * tNS, Secretai j . 

U ih S, Bi rsk, Treasurer. 

1 CUTIVE AND INVESTMENT COMMITTEE 

I 1 <.i 1 A. N( >bi 1 . ( li.Mi 111. in ( v offii io 

FOHI P. Mi 1 l( 1. I ■|,u \| (I , \\ . BlDDl 1 

I D M. I'ii. 1. 1 1 . Ik. ,I(.ii\ S. Bi 1 1 

< ha ri.es W. Straw 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



GOVERNMENT AND INSTRUCTION 



Cor. W. Prettyman 
John S. Bursk 
C. Price Speer 
John P. Melick 
Luther B. Wilson 
Harry I. Huber 



Thomas C. Smith 
Wm. A. Stephens 
*Benj. C. Lippincott 
George B. Wight 
J. Henry Baker 



Henry M. Wilson 
Charles W. Straw 
Louis E. Barrett 
Henry P. Cannon 
Robley D. Jones 



Geo. D. Chenoweth G. Lane Taneyhill 



Luther T. Widerman 
Luther B. Wilson 
Charles J. Hepburn 
Edward C. Stokes 



FACULTY 

William L. Boswell 
Joseph E. Holland 
William W. Evans 
George B. Wight 
Isaac McCurley 



G. Lane Taneyhill 
Thos. E. Martindale 
Frank B. Lynch 
William L. Woodcock 



Horatio C. King 
James F. Rusling 
David H. Carroll 
Joseph J. Baughman 
Leslie M. Shaw 
John P. Melick 



FINANCE 

Boyd L. Spahr 
Frank C. Bosler 
William W. Evans 
Chas. B. Prettyman 
Charles K. Zug 
Isaac McCurley 
William D. Boyer 



William L. Woodcock 
John A. Secor 
Edward W. Biddle 
Henry P. Cannon 
J. Henry Baker 
Robley D. Jones 



Henry M. Wilson 
William W. Evans 
Thos. E. Martindale 



VACANCIES 

Frank B. Lynch 
Luther T. Widerman 
Horatio C. King 



William A. Stephens 
Benj. C. Lippincott 
William P. Davis 



Edward M. Biddle, 
Frank C. Bosler 
James F. Rusling 



LIBRARY 

Jr. Henry P. Cannon 
J. Henry Baker 
Charles W. Straw 



Henry M. Wilson 
Thomas C. Smith 
Charles J. Hepburn 



GROUNDS 

David H. Carroll 
Edward M. Biddle, Jr 
William P. Davis 
Melville Gambrill 

*Deceased. 



AND BUILDINGS 



John P. Melick 
Edward W. Biddle 
William D. Boyer 
Franklin F. Bond 



Frank C. Bosler 
John S. Bursk 
George D. Chenoweth 



(11) 



FACULTY 



EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., President 
OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph.D., Dean 

AND PROFESSOR OF GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph. D. 

THOMAS BEAVER PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 

SUSAN POWERS HOFFMAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHI S1CS 

WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND I Dl < \il<>\ 

III \in MAI I Ml \\ STEPHENS, & .1). 

PROl I SSOR Ol BI< »i < k.n 

MERN IN GRANT III I Ik. \.M. 

PROFESSOR O] i \ I i\ LANG1 \i.i wn LITERATUR1 

( 0RN1 I I! S Will I AM PRE | n MAN. I>...l). 
PROl i ' ' OR "i ..i RMAN I \\<.t \<.i \m, i mi RATI ki 

MON K.oMl in POR I I R si i i ERS, A.M. 

PROl i ■ BOR 01 inn rORK IND i HI I NCI isil I w«.i \<.i 

HI Mn I R] I MAN WIN I l\(, S( l) 

,,|( ' I F LATIN \M> (.ki i K 

I ' 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 13 

FACULTY, continued 

LEON CUSHING PRINCE, A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND ECONOMICS 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 

GEORGE A. CRIDER, A.M. 

PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND BUSINESS INSTITUTIONS 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A.M. 

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS, AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 

EDWIN HENRY KELLOGG, A.B., B.D. 

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH BIBLE 

LUCRETIA JONES McANNEY, M.O. 

DEAN OF WOMEN, AND INSTRUCTOR IN ORATORY 

ARTHUR BATES JENNINGS, Jr. 

INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY AND THEORY OF MUSIC 



OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph.D. 

SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY, AND LIBRARIAN 



JOHN S. BURSK 

TREASURER 



SARA M. BLACK 

SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

Eugene A. Noble James Henry Morgan 

Cornelius W. Prettyman John Frederick Mohler 

Bradford Oliver McIntire Mervin Grant Filler 

GRADUATE WORK 

Bradford Oliver McIntire Leon Cushing Prince 

Montgomery P. Sellers 

library 

Eugene Allen Noble Ovando Byron Super 

James Henry Morgan Leon Cushing Prince 

athletics 

Henry Matthew Stephens William WeidmaN* Landis 

Forrest Eugene Craver 

THE FACULTY — SENATE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

Eugene Allen Noble Henry Matthew Stephens 

Henry Freeman Whiting 



SPECIAL STAFF 1910-11 
in, Ri vbrend DANIEL DORCHESTER, D.D. 

COMMENCEMENT PREACHER BBFOR1 <<miic,i CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION! 

I mi Ri m ri m, FAIRBANK B. STO< KDA] I . S.T.D. 

COLLEC1 PREACHER. WEEK Ol PRAYER FOR COLLE< 



L4 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 

June, 1911 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. H. D. Mitchell Rev. J. C. Nicholson, D.D. 

Rev. J. Frederick Heisse, D.D. Rev. U. S. Wright 
Rev. Edward Hayes 

WILMINGTON 
Rev. Ralph T. Coursey Rev. S. M. Morgan, D.D. 

NEW JERSEY 

Rev. J. Morgan Read, D.D. Rev. John B. Haines, D.D. 

Rev. G. E. Archer 

PHILADELPHIA 

Rev. George W. Babcock, Ph.D. Rev. E. W. Burke 
Rev. Linn Bowman, D.D. Rev. Francis H. Tees 

George Stradling Prof. George W. Hull 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. N. H. Smith Rev. E. H. Yocum, D.D. 

Rev. H. K. Ash Rev. Isaac Cadman 

Rev. T. S. Stansfield H. T. Ames 

Prof. Kimber Cleaver J. F. Davis 

T. H. Murray, Esq. S. W. Dickson, Esq. 

J. E. Baker Rev. D. N. Miller 

NEWARK 

Rev. W. W. Youngson Rev. Frederick J. Hubach 

Rev. William Redheffer Rev. W. S. Coeyman 

NEW YORK EAST 

Rev. W. W. Bowdish, D. D. Rev. I. A. Marsland 

Rev. A. .B. Sanford 

WYOMING 
Rev. S. B. Murray Rev. R. S. Burch 

(15) 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY 
THE COLLEGE 

June 7, 1911 

I. HONORIS CAUSA 

LL.D — DOCTOR OF LAWS 

George Kunkel, Harrisburg. 

Nathaniel G. Keirle, M.D. (Dickinson, ' 55), Baltimore, Md. 

LlTT.D— DOCTOR OF LITERATURE 
Clyde B. Furst, A.M. (Dickinson, '93), New York City. 

SC.D.— DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 
Charles Bascom Ridgaway (Dickinson, '76), Laramie, Wyoming. 

[D.D.— DOCTOR [OF DIVINITY 

Rev. Augustus S. Fasick (Dickinson, '92), Carlisle. 
Rev. George W. Babcock (Dickinson, '89), Philadelphia. 
Rev. Isaac L. Wood (Dickinson, '84), Trenton, N. J. 
Rev. Charles E. Guthrie, Wilkes-Barre. 
Rev. George G. Vogel, Newark, N. J. 

A.M.— MASTER OF ARTS 

M. Friedman, ( larlisle. 

Mi km in Francis Sherwood, New York City. 

John L. \ uu>, M.D., Philadelphia. 

Mi Mari B. Peir( b, Philadelphia. 

II. IN CURSU 
A.M. MASTER OF ARTS 

Ai 1.1 R 1 . I 1 BUTLBR, I'll Ri 1 

I Vu Icinsoi I Hckinson, '<>*' 

\ ley, Foster ( ( \k\ i r. \k rHUR 1 [enri 
I )k Icinson I lickinson, '02. 

1 ri 1 ";< .1 1 1 \Koi i) Coalb, Samuel ( irroi 1 
l >i< Icinson, '10 I )ickinson, '08 

I I \im;\ fOHN I )i M \ki 1 . J< »S1 PH P, 

I »i< 1. 1 n- on, ' i" I >ickinson, '09 

11/. Edwin Ei di r Dout, S \m\ m Kiuhn 

I )u Icinson, '<><; I >ickinson, ' 10 

(18) 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 



17 



A.M.-MASTER 

Foley, Patrick C. 

St. Thomas College, '05 
Gilbert, Richard Henry, Jr. 

Syracuse University, '09 
Harnish, Jacob Hiestand 

Dickinson, ' 10 
Hoover, Jeremiah F. 

Dickinson, 'oi 
Houseman, William F. 

Dickinson, '09 
Kelbaugh, Charles Henry 

Dickinson, 'io 
McCullough, James Clair 

Dickinson, '09 
Mack, Frank 

Dickinson, '98 

MlLBURN, J. RUDISILL 

Dickinson, '06 
Powell, Charles Detliff 
Dickinson, '09 



OF ARTS, continued 

Salter, Charles M. 

Dickinson, '06. 
Schappelle, Benjamin Franklin 

Dickinson, '08 
Smith, Ralph Ewing 

Dickinson, '05 
Snyder, Ivan Lott 

Dickinson, '10 
Standing, Alfred John 

Dickinson, '05 
Stuart, Hugh Chalmers 

Dickinson, '10 
Wallis, Wilson Dallam 

Dickinson, '07 
Williams, John Merrill 

Dickinson, '08 
Williams, John Wesley 

Dickinson, '09 
Young, Charles Raymond 

Dickinson, '09 



A.B.— BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Bowers, Edna Ames 
Briner, Charles Solomon 
Caldwell, Rankin S. 
Clarkson, John Leeds 
Eitzel, Howard Samuel 
kllmore, manetta evelyn 
McCullough, Bessie 
Morgan, Julia 
Moyer, Frank E. 



Nagle, James Stewart 
Quimby, Karl Kline 
Shenton, Jennie D. 
Shuck, Albert C. 
Strock, Grace Susan 
Teel, Harold Gilbert 
Thompson, Howard E. 
Williams, Gordon Arch 
Williamson, Helen Katherine 



PH.B- BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Albertson, Albert Olin 
Arntzen, Ella Margaret 
Barringer, Aaron Hatfield 
Boell, Victor Henry 
Briggs, Eloise Irene 
Cleaver, Charles Leroy 
Corning, Hobart Munson 
Crane, Jesse Ernest 
Deardorff, Merle Henry 
Dum, Ray S. 
Galley, Blanche M. 
Gish, Harvey O. 
Globisch, Bertha S. 



gougler, troutman 
Hemphill, Joseph Sharp 
Hench, Louise Catherine 
Hoch, Harry K. 
Hollow ay, Chester Clay 
Hopkins, James Pennock 
Horn, Allen P. 
Hughes, James Hurd, Jr. 
Kisner, Florence Rebecca 
Kramer, Charles Frederick 
Landis, William B. 
Leas, Goldie 
Lehman, M. Helen 



18 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Ph. B— BACHELOR OF 

Lodge, Charles Martin 
Loeser, Harry R. 
Lorenz, Robert Donald 
Macklin, George T. 
Milburn, Emily Snowden 
Miller, J. Rolla 
Miller, Susan 
Miller, Thomas Byron 
Richmond, Leon Henry 
Smith, Clara Bell 



PHILOSOPHY, continued 

Smith, Henry Elmore 
Smith, Ray Patton 
Smith, William Moore 
Stroup, John Meetch 
Stuart, Roy Fleming 
Thompson, J. Vance 
Van Blarcom, Martin 
Vosburg, Percy Leach 
Witmer, Mary Eleta 
Wright, John Arthur 



SC.B.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Adams, Forrest Edwin 
Peffer, Elmer 



Phares, Will Carleton 
Salter, Vaughn Thomas 



LL.B- BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Barnttz, Edwin Elder 
Barrett, Jerome Kelly 
Brennan, Daniel Edward 
Buckley, Bayard Lanning 
Cook, Scott Harrison 
Dipple, Walter Leroy 
Felton, I loi Di \ Stanley 
Foi i ■> , P \ rRicK ( !harles 
( .11 i-.i i: i , Rich \kd I (enri , Jr. 

I I wki i , Rom R I \\ \K|;i \ 



Hoover, Jeremiah F. 
Houseman, William F. 
Jackson, John R. 
Locuta, Joseph Caesar 
Morgan, Gomer W. 
Parsons, Irving Paul 
Savidge, Preston Mettler 
Smith, Ralph Ewing 
Strauss, William 

^ \k\ \i i , Josi iMi Oi w 



COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Class 1911 

FOR KXCKLLKNCK IN SCHOLARSHIP 



Forri i I . \i)\\is. Atlantic < ity, N. .1. 
Miller, Re iding. 



Ii n\ MORG w. ( '.ulislo. 
Jl NNI1 I >. Sin NTON, ( .nil U 



POR EXCELLENCE in ESSAY AND ORATORICAL WORK 
junior and SENIOR YEARS 

.1 wii s I Ii ki> I Ii CHi . I elton, I >el. 
\\ ii 1 1 wi B. I \ i»i , Rock < rlen. 

I Mil \ S IOWD1 • MlLBI RN, Knckli.i n n< m, \\ . \ .1. 

1 1<>\\ \«i> I . I hompson, Shei wood, Md. 

Joh 1 Ak 1 111 i< \\ km. 11 1 . < oate \ ille. 



Courses of Study 

The college offers four parallel courses of study, each covering 
four years: The Classical, the Latin-Scientific, the Scientific, and 
the Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are largely 
required; but, in the last two years, the work is mostly elective as 
shown under Order of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per week, 
are required in the Freshman year, but are elective, three hours each 
per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Classical 
course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by additional studies 
in the modern languages and science. 

Scientific Course. — Latin and Greek are not required, though 
either of them may be offered for admission, a large amount of time 
being given to studies in science, mathematics, and modern languages. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Law Electives. — Three hours per week of law may be elected in 
the Junior, and five hours per week in the Senior year. By judicious 
election and a little extra work, students may save one year in their 
subsequent course in the School of Law. An extra charge is made 
when law is elected in place of college work. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in May 
and must have the approval of class deans. Change in electives may 
be made for good reason with the consent of class deans during the first 
three days of the college year, but later changes can be made only with 
consent of the Faculty. 

Extra Elective Studies. — -Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of the Fac- 
ulty, such additional work will not interfere with their regular work. 

Special Students. — Students with uneven preparation may be 
admitted to the college upon showing, by examination or otherwise, 
that they are prepared for college work; but no such students will be 
admitted unless fully prepared in English, history, and one other 
subject of college preparation, nor with less than eleven units of 
college preparatory work, a unit of such work being a year's study of 
some preparatory subject, not less than four periods per week. 

Graduate Work. — Graduate work is provided only for the alumni 
of the college who are candidates for the Master's Degree. For further 
information, see Degrees. 

(19) 



Admission 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In all 
cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, and, if 
from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college will 
not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Preparatory and High Schools of approved standing are allowed 
by the Faculty to examine their own students for admission to the 
college, and such students are admitted to the Freshman class on the 
certification of their principals that the requirements for admission 
have been fully met. Certificates covering less than the full require- 
ments may or may not be accepted, depending upon the amount of 
the shortage and the conditions under which the work was done. I low- 
ever, students in arrears in preparation one full year's work in English, 
or more than one year's work in any other study, will be examined 
on all the work offered in the subject or subjects in which there is this 
deficiency. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the college may or may not 
be accepted, depending on the institution in which the advanced work 

has been done, and the brandies of college work for which the certifi- 
cate is offered. In other words, candidates for such advanced standing 

must show that they are capable of doing the work of the advanced 

classes for which thej apply. 

Blank forms of certificates for work done will be furnished by the 

college on application, and it is required that these certificates be srnt 

to the college dired lioin the principal of the prepaiatoi\ School. 

Diplomas oi certificates oi graduation from schools or seminaries 
will not be accepted, unless accompanied by statements that they 

thi WOr\ required l"i admission to the college, as indicated in 

the < oil. •< . atalogue. 

ON KXAMINATION 

I iminations Foi admission are held on I uesdaj of commencement 

and on the d.i\ I., ton the opening of the fall term. 
I oi advanced standing students will be examined in the preparatory 
work for entrance to collegi and in the studies previously pursued by 

t Ik < lasses I In \ pro] iosc lo entel . 

20 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
CLASSICAL COURSE 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is 
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division 
into paragraphs. 

i. Reading and Practice. — A certain number of books will be 
recommended for reading, ten of which, selected as prescribed below, 
are to be offered for examination. The form of examination will usually 
be the writing of a paragraph or two on each of several topics, to be 
chosen by the candidate from a considerable number — perhaps ten or 
fifteen — set before him in the examination paper. The treatment of 
these topics is designed to test the candidate's power of clear and accu- 
rate expression, and will call only for a general knowledge of the 
substance of the books. In every case knowledge of the book will be 
regarded as less important than the ability to write good English. In 
place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present 
an exercise book, properly certified to by his instructor, containing 
compositions or other written work done in connection with the reading 
of the books. In preparation for this part of the requirement, it is 
important that the candidate shall have been instructed in the funda- 
mental principles of rhetoric. 
For the year igi2. 

Group I. (Two to be selected.) 

Shakespeare's "As You Like It," "Henry V," "Julius Caesar," "The 
Merchant of Venice," "Twelfth Night." 

Group II. (One to be selected.) 

Bacon's Essays; Bunyan's "The Pilgrim's Progress," Part I; The 
"Sir Roger de Co verley Papers" in the Spectator; Franklin's Auto- 
biography. 

Group III. (One to be selected.) 

Chaucer's "Prologue;" Spencer's "Faerie Queen," Part I; Pope's 
"The Rape of the Lock;" Goldsmith's "The Deserted Village;" Pal- 
grave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series) Books II and III, with 
especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected.) 

Goldsmith's "The Vicar of Wakefield;" Scott's "Ivanhoe," "Quentin 
Durward;" Hawthorne's "The House of Seven Gables;" Thackeray's 
"Henry Esmond;" Mrs. Gaskell's "Cranford;" Dickens' "A Tale of 
Two Cities;" George Eliot's "Silas Marner;" Blackmore's "Lorna 
Doone." 

Group V. (Two to be selected.) 

Irving's "Sketch Book;" Lamb's "Essays of Elia;" De Quincey's 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

"Joan of Arc," "The English Mail Coach;" Carlyle's "Hero as Poet, 
Man of Letters, and as King;" Emerson's Essays (Selected); Ruskin's 
"Sesame and Lilies." 

Group VI. (Two to be selected.) 

Coleridge's "The Ancient Mariner;" Scott's "The Lady of the 
Lake;" Byron's "Mazeppa," "The Prisoner of Chillon;" Palgrave's 
"Golden Treasury" (First Series) Book IV, with especial attention to 
Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient 
Rome;" Poe's Poems; Lowell's "The Vision of Sir Launfal;" Arnold's 
"Sohrab and Rustum;" Longfellow's "The Courtship of Miles Stan- 
dish;" Tennyson's "Princess;" Browning's "Cavalier Tunes," "The 
Lost Leader," "How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to 
Aix," "Evelyn Hope," "Home Thoughts from Abroad," "Home 
Thoughts from the Sea," "Incident of the French Camp," "The Boy 
and the Angel," "One Word More," "Herve Riel," "Pheidippides." 

II. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination presup- 
poses the thorough study of each of the works named below. The 
examination will be upon subject-matter, form, and structure. In 
addition, the candidate may be required to answer questions involving 
the essentials of English grammar, and questions on the leading facts 
in those periods of English literary history to which the prescribed 
works belong. 

For the year 1912, the books set for this part of the examination 
will be as follows: 

Shakespeare's "Macbeth;" Milton's "Comus," "I .'Allegro," "II 
Penseroso," or Tennyson's "Idylls of the King;" Burke's Speech on 
Conciliation with America, or Washington's Ian-well Address and 
Webster's Firsl Bunkei Hill Oration; Macaulay's "Life of Johnson," 
oi ( arlj le's "Essa) on Burns." 

Greek. Gram mat (Goodwin); Xenophon's "Anabasis," four 
books; Homer's "Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the ( -nek texts read from da) to da) 
in preparation is recommended, and ability to write simple Greek sen- 
1 equired. 

II" roRY. Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States. The 
follov mII indicate the amounl required: Oman's "History of 

Grecct ." I 'Hi toi \ oi Rome" I to the ( lose oi the n 

"i Smith'! "Sm. ill, 1 Historj oi Rome," McLaughlin's 

tor) oi th« 1 im 1 c d States foi Schools." 

I vii I. Ni« Latin reading required of candidates for admission 

to colli "i 1 regard to the prescription oi particulai authors and 

ill be noi I- bs in amounl than < aesar, "i Mu War," I IVj 

nsl < atiliru . "I oi tin Manilian I aw," and 

Vci .1. " I I," I \ I. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 23 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by the 
schools from the following authors and works: Caesar, "Gallic War" 
and "Civil War;" Nepos, "Lives"; Cicero, "Orations" and "De Senec- 
tute;" Sallust, "Catiline" and "Jugurthine War;" Vergil, "Bucolics," 
"Georgics," and 'TEneid;" and Ovid, "Metamorphoses," "Fasti," 
and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recommended by 
the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; Algebra 
through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, including the solu- 
tion of one hundred or more original exercises. 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

(a.) English, History, Latin, and Mathematics, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

(6.) French or German. Three years' work, recitations daily, in 
either French or German. Two years' work in French or German will 
be accepted, provided a year's work in either Botany, Chemistry, Phys- 
ics, or Physical Geography is also presented. 

The preparation in French should comprise careful drill in the 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and the 
common irregular verbs, the inflection of adjectives and the use of the 
participles and pronouns, constant attention being paid to pronuncia- 
tion. Much time should be given to translations, both oral and written, 
of easy English into French. From 600 to 800 pages of graduated texts 
should be read. Where much attention has been given to oral work, the 
amount of reading may be diminished. 

Students offering German as an entrance requirement should be 
thoroughly familiar with the essentials of German Grammar; should 
be able to translate easy English into German; should be able to trans- 
late at sight easy German prose, and should be able to pronounce with 
a fair degree of accuracy. From 400 to 800 pages of graduated texts 
should have been read. 

SCIENTIFIC OR PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

1. The requirements for the Latin-Scientific course; or, 

2. (a.) Mathematics, English, and History, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

(6.) Latin or Greek. Four books of Caesar, or equivalent' of 
Greek. 

(c.) French or German. Three years' work Two years' work, 
however, in French or German will be accepted, provided an additional 
year's work is offered in either History or Latin, or the Mathematics of 
the Freshman year. 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

(</.) Science. — Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany, 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 

3. (a.) English and History, the same as for the Classical course. 

(6.) Mathematics. — The entrance requirements for the Classical 
course and the Mathematics of the Freshman year. 

(c.) French and German. — Two years' work in both French and 
German. The work required in each language is fully described under 
admission to Latin-Scientific course. 

(d.) Science. — Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany, 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 






Order of Studies 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

English. — Paragraph-Writing (Scott and Denney). Argumentation 
(Baker). Narration (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Bald- 
win). (Four hours per week.) 

Greek. — Selections from Thucydides, Herodotus, and Lysias. Prose 
Composition. Sight Reading. (Four hours per week.) 

History. — Political and Constitutional History oj England. (Two hours 
per week.) 

Latin. — Selections from Sallust and Livy; Cicero: De Senectute or 
De Amicitia. Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed, and emphasis 
laid upon the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is g'ven 
to translation in the classroom and to the writing of easy Latin 
Prose. Roman History is reviewed. The course is largely devoted 
to drill work, and aims to prepare the student for the intelligent 
and sympathetic reading of Latin literature in subsequent courses. 
(Four hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — (One hour per week.) 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

English. — Paragraph-Writing (Scott and Denney). Argumentation 
(Baker). Narration (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Bald- 
win). (Four hours per week.) 

French. — M'emoires d'un Collegien. Le Tour du Monde. Roman d'un 
Jeune Homme Pauvre. Strasbourg. Pecheur a" Islande. (Four hours 
per week.) 

German. — Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). (Four hours 
per week.) 

(25) 



26 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



History. — Political and Constitutional History oj England. (Two 
hours per week.) 

Latin. — Selections from Sallust and Livy; Cicero: De Senectute o r 
De Amicitia. Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed, and emphasis 
laid upon the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is 
given to translation in the classroom and to the writing of easy 
Latin Prose. Roman History is reviewed. The course is largely 
devoted to drill-work, and aims to prepare the student for the 
intelligent and sympathetic reading of Latin literature in subse- 
quent courses. (Four hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wcntworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Mi SIC. lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

ORATORY. 'One hour per week.) 



PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

English. Paragrapb-Writirig (Scott and Denney). Argumentation 
Baker). Narration (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Bald- 

\\ in i. ! lour hours per week.) 

'ii. Gramma) (Aldrich and Foster). Easj Readings. (Three 

hoiirS pel week.) ( )r 

ii. Memoirs (Tun Coll'egien. /< Tour du Monde. Roman (fun 
Jeum Homme Pauvre. Strasbourg. Pecbeur cP Islande, lour hours 

B German), Spanhoofd's Lebrbucb del Deutscben 

Spracbe. i I iiK <• hours pei week.) Or, 

Rca< Prosi Composition WesseJhoeft), (Foui hours 

Political and *nal Histor] of England, (Two hours 

pei 

Solid Geometry Durell). Ugebra (Wentworth). 

/'/" I '"< l.< tt). I OUI hours | ><i week.) 

th< I I j ol Mu Si hi Reading, 

oi l. m I larmom I wo hours pei week.) 

I fbl ill • I u.l. | 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 27 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Biology. — General Biology (Sedgwick and Wilson). (Three hours 
per week for one term.) 

English. — Paragraph-Writing (Scott and Denney). Argumentation 
(Baker). Narration (Brewster). College Manual of Rhetoric (Bald- 
win). (Four hours per week.) 

French. — Memoires d'un Collegien. Le Tour du Monde. Roman d'un 
Jeune Homme Pauvre. Strasbourg. Pecheur d'Islande. (Four hours 
per week.) 

German. — Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). (Four hours 

per week.) 
History. — Political a?id Constitutional History of England. (Two hours 

per week.) 
Logic. — (Three hours per week for one term.) 

Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — (One hour per week.) 

Psychology. — (One hour per week for one term.) 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

Required Studies. 
Biology. — General Biology (Sedgwick and Wilson). (Three hours 

per week for one term.) 
English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 

revised; Cunliffc), with lectures and class and private reading. 

(Three hours per week.) 
Logic. — (Three hours per week for one term.) 
Political Science. — American Government. Constitutional Studies. 

(Two hours per week.) 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week for one term.) 
Elective Studies. — (Nine hours, to be elected.) 
Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

*German. — (Beginning German). Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der Deutschen 
Sprache. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek. — Lucian: Dialogues. Plato: Apology. Sophocles: (Edipus 
Rex. 

Latin. — An outline study of the History oj Latin Literature, with illus- 
trative readings from the more important writers. In the first 
half-year Classical Mythology is reviewed, with particular reference 
to its use in later literature and art; in the second half-year the 
Manners and Customs oj the Romans are considered. (Three hours 
per week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — Advanced work with particular reference to the preparation 
and delivery of original orations. (Optional.) 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies. 
Biology. — General Biology (Sedgwick and Wilson). (Three hours per 
week for one term. ) 

Chemistry. Text-hook, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 
I .aboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 
revised; Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading. 

(I line hours per week.) 

Lock . I I firee hours per week for one term.) 

Politicai Science, American Government. Constitutional Studies. 

(Two hours per w< ek. I 
Psychology. (Thre< hours per week for one term.) 

I.l.i live Studies. (Six limns, tO DC elected.) 

French. Histoin a\ France (Michelet). IWran-. French Short 
Stories (Buffum), (Three hours per week.) Grammar (Aldrich 
and Fosfc I R< ■■ I hree hours per week.) 

"Germ Bt innin German), Spanhoofd's Lebrbucb der Deutschen 

Sprat be. ( I hree hours pei week.) Or, 

Schiller*! Dramas and loum Poems. (Three hours per 

eh 01 < •■ i in. m must < ontinue it at l< itt I hrough 
ili. Funioi • 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 

Latin. — An outline study of the History of Latin Literature, with illus- 
trative readings from the more important writers. In the first 
half-year Classical Mythology is reviewed, with particular reference 
to its use in later literature and art; in the second half-year the 
Manners and Customs of the Romans are considered. (Three hours 
per week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — Advanced work with particular reference to preparation 
and delivery of original orations. Optional. 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

Required Studies. 
Biology. — General Biology (Sedgwick and Wilson). (Three hours 

per week for one term.) 
Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 
English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 

revised; Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading. 

(Three hours per week.) 
French. — M'emoires d'un Collegien. Le Tour du Monde. Roman d'un 

Jeune Homme Pauvre. Strasbourg. Pecheur d'Islande. (Four hours 

per week.) Or, 
*German. — Deutches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 

German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) 
Logic. — (Three hours per week for one term.) 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Same as in Classical course. 
Political Science. — American Government. Constitutional Studies. 

(Two hours per week.) 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week for one term.) 
Elective Studies. — (Three hours, to be elected.) 
French. — Histoire de France (Michelet). UAvare. French Short 

Stories (Buffum). (Three hours per week.) 

♦Students who elect beginning French or German must continue it at least through 
the Junjor year. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

German. — Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours per 
week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Snyder and Hutchinson). (Three hours per week.) 

Physics.— Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Pancoast, 
revised; Cunliffe), with lectures and class and private reading. 
(Three hours per week.) 

French. — Histoire de France (Michelet). L'Avare. French Short 
Stories (BufFum). (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster.) Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week.) 

*German. — (Beginning German). Spanhoofd's Lebrbucb der Deutscben 
Spracbe. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours per week.) 

M.\ i in MATICS. Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
\ der and I [utchinson). (Three hours per week.) 

Music. Lectures on theTheorj of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 

Optional lor .ill students. 

Oratory. Same as In the Classical course. 

Physics. Text- book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period <>l two hours per week.) 

Politjcai Science. American Government. Constitutional Studies. 
(Two hours pel wei 

i , i, ..i (..Muni mhi .1 continue it .'»i l< isi through 
ill. funioi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

JUNIOR CLASS 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

(Sixteen hours, to be elected.) 
Archeology. — Lectures and Readings. (One hour per week.) 

Botany. — (Three hours per week.) 

*Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 
Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) Or, 

Advanced. — (Two hours per week.) Laboratory course in 
Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Economics. — Principles of Political Economy (Gide). (Three hours 
per week.) 

English Bible. — Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 
(Two hours per week, second half-year.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 
(Two hours per week.) 

English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 
Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year.) 

Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 

| French. — Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week.) 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek. — Homer, and the Lyric Poets. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek Testament. — Selected Books from the New Testament. (Two 
hours per week.) 

History. — A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week throughout the year.) 

Latin. — Course I. — A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 
from Catullus, Horace, and others. First half-year. 

The Latin Drama, with a brief study of its development. 
Several comedies of Plautus and Terence and one tragedy of 
Seneca will be read. Second half-year. (Three hours per week.) 

*Either Physics or Chemistry, with corresponding Laboratory course, must be elected, 
unless Chemistry was taken in the Sophomore year. 

tStudents who elect beginning French must continue^the subject through the Senior 
year. 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Course II. — A Study of Vergil's Works, Life, and Literary 

Influence, with readings from the Eclogues and the JEneid, Books 

VI-XII. First half-year. 

The Correspondence of Cicero, with particular reference to 

his political career and the public life of the times. Lectures on 

Roman Political Institutions. Second half-year. 

In this course some attention is given to the needs of those 

planning to teach. (Three hours per week.) 
Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 
Mathematics. — Advanced Calculus, one term; Differential Equations 

(Murray), two terms. (Three hours per week.) 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. Optional. 
*Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year.) 
Social Problems. — Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 

lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 

the year.) 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
Required Studies. 
Physics. Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Laboratory 
course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

Elective Studies. (Thirteen hours, to be elected.) 
\'» >\ ■■ .-\ . (Three hours per week. ) 
(.in mistry. Advanced. (Two hours per week.) Laboratory course In 

Analytical Chemistry, (Two periods of two hours pei week.) 
Economics. Principles oj Political Economy (Gide). (Three limns 

pei week*) 
I i M I'n. i i . I c\t-l)()ok and lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

i \<.i. History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 
i Iwd limns pei week, second half-year.) 
English Literature. Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 

(I wo hours pei w 1 1 
i i n. Old. old English Grammas (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 

Readei (Bright). (Two hours pei week, first half-year.) 
I i in< .. | I in* ( hours i" i week, i ■< * ond ha 1 1 /ear.) 

M. Histoin </< Frana (Michelet). L'Avare, French Short 
Stories (Buffum). (Three hours pei week.) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 

German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) Or, 
Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) 
Note: This course is open only to students who have had at 

least three years of German. 
History. — A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 

week, throughout the year.) 
Latin. — Course I. A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 

from Catullus, Horace, and others. First half-year. The Latin 

Drama, with a brief study of its development. Several comedies 

of Plautus and Terence and one tragedy of Seneca will be read. 

Second half-year. (Three hours per week.) 

Course II. A Study of Vergil's Works, Life, and Literary In- 
fluence, with readings from the Eclogues and the /Eneid, Books 

VI-XII. First half-year. 

The Correspondence of Cicero, with particular reference to his 

political career and the public life of the times. Lectures on Roman 

Political Institutions. Second half-year. (Three hours per week.) 
In this course some attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 
Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 
Mathematics. — Advanced Calculus, one term; Differential Equations 

(Murray), two terms. (Three hours per week.) 
Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 

and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 

Optional for all students. 
Oratory. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. Optional. 
Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year.) 
Social Problems. — Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 

lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 

the year.) 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies. 
Botany. — (Three hours per week.) 

Chemistry.— Advanced. (Two hours per week.) Laboratory course 
in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two hours per week.) 
Physics. — Advanced. (Three hours per week.) Laboratory course. 
(One period of two hours per week.) 

Elective Studies. — (Five hours, to be elected.) 
Economics. — Principles of Political Economy (Gide). (Three hours per 
week.) 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

English Bible. — Text-book and lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury) 
(Two hours per week, second half-year.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 
(Two hours per week.) 

English, Old.— Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 
Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year.) 

Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 

French. — Histoire de France (Michelet). L'Avare. French Short 
Stories (Buffum). (Three hours per week.) 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 
Note: This course is open only to students who have had at 
least three years of German. 

History. — A Study oj Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week throughout the year.) 

Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 

MATHEMATICS. — Solid Geometry (C. Smith). (Two hours per week.) 
Problems. (One hour per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in I larmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. Lectures on Oratory and Orators. Optional. 

Psy< hology. (Three hours per week, Inst half-year.) 

s<«i\i Problems. Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 
lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours pei week, throughout 
i Ik year.) 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURS1 

I Sixteen Imhii ., I< > I >e elec I e. I | 
I lure h0Ur8 PCI week.) 

Chemistry, idvanctd. 'I wo hours pei week.) Laboratory course 
in Analytical ( hemistry, I I wo periods oi two hours pej week. | 

Principles <>\ Political Economy (Gide). (Three hours 

pel week.) 

I CLI8H I'.iri i fcxt-l k and lectures. (Two hours per week.) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

English Language. — History of the English Language (Lounsbury). 
(Two hours per week second half-year.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 
Two hours per week.) 

English, Old. — Old English Grammar (Smith), and Anglo-Saxon 
Reader (Bright). (Two hours per week, first half-year.) 

Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 

French. — Histoire de France (Michelet). L'Avare. French Short 
Stories (BufFum). (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three hours 
per week.) 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Valerland (Bacon). 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Note: This course 
is open only to students who have had at least three years of 
German. 

History. — A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week, throughout the year.) 

Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Advanced Calculus, one term; Differential Equations 
(Murray), two terms. (Three hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — Lectures on Oratory and Orators. Optional. 

* Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year.) 

Social Problems. — Practical Sociology (Wright), supplemented by 
lectures and laboratory work. (Three hours per week throughout 
the year.) 

*Physics must be taken, unless it was taken in the Sophomore year. 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SENIOR CLASS 

CLASSICAL, LATIN-SCIENTIFIC, OR 
PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

(Sixteen hours to be elected from the following, not before taken, 
and for which the student is prepared.) 

American Literature. — Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast); The Chief American Poets (Page); with lectures and class 
and private readings. (One hour per week.) 

Archeology. — Lectures and readings. (One hour per week.) 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week.) 

Business Institutions. — Economic History of the United States 
(Bogart), supplemented by lectures and laboratory work. (Three 
hours per week throughout the year.) 

Chemistry. — Advanced, (a) (Two or four hours per week.) Labo- 
ratory course in Quantitative Analysis. 

(6) Organic Chemistry. Text-book, with lectures. (Two 
hours per week.) Laboratory course. (Two periods of two hours 
per week.) 

Christian Evidences. — (Two hours per week, last fourth of year.) 

I in ' vi ion. Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week.) 

Iii' ran in. / lectridty and Magnetism (Thompson). (Three hours 
per week, for one term.) 

I i i isn Drama. Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 

week.) 

French. Histoire de France (Michelet). L'Avare. French Short 
Stories (Buffum). (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Grammai (Aldrich and Foster). Easj Readings. (Three 

Ik. up DCl week.) 

Geology. (Two hours pei \\ eek.) 

German. Goethe's Dramas and Longei Poems, (Three hours per 

i ( )i . 

( ,<h tin'-, / aust. I 1 1 1 1 « ( In mi is pei week.) Nori ! I Ins course 
open "iiK to students who have had a1 leasl three years ol 
( ,< i man. 

Greek. Homer, and th< Lyrii Poets. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek h-iwu-.i. Selected Book From the New Testament (Two 
hours pei w< i 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

History. — Civilization in Europe. (Two hours per week throughout the 
year.) 

International Law. — International Law. Text book and lectures, 
with the study of cases. (Two hours per week.) 

Latin. — Course I. A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 
from Catullus, Horace, and others. First half-year. 

The Latin Drama, with a brief study of its development. 
Several comedies of Plautus and Terence and one tragedy of 
Seneca will be read. Second half-year. (Three hours per week.) 

Course II. A Study of Vergil's Works, Life, and Literary In- 
fluence, with readings from the Eclogues and the JEneid, Books 
VI-XII. First half-year. 

The Correspondence of Cicero, with particular reference to 
his political career, and the public life of the times. Lectures on 
Roman Political Institutions. Second half-year. (Three hours 
per week.) 

In this course some attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 

Law. — (Five hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Advanced Calculus, one term; Differential Equations 
(Murray), two terms. (Three hours per week.) 

Music. — Lectures on the Theory of Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 
and practical work in Harmonization. (Two hours per week.) 
Optional for all students. 

Oratory. — Original work in making orations, with particular atten- 
tion to public delivery. 

Philosophy. — (Three hours. per week.) 

Physics. — Advanced Course. (Three hours per week for two terms.) 
Laboratory course: Physical experiments and measurements in 
heat, light, and electricity. Photographic practice. (One or 
two periods of two hours per week.) 

Zoology. — (Two hours per week.) 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
Required Studies. 
Chemistry. — Advanced, (a) (Two or four hours per week.) Laboratory 
course in Quantitative Analysis. 

(6) Organic Chemistry. Text-book, with lectures. (Two 
hours per week.) Laboratory course. (Two periods of two hours 
per week.) 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week.) Or, 
Geology. — (Two hours per week.) 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Oratory. — Original work in making orations, with particular atten- 
tion to public delivery. 

Physical Laboratory. — (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Zoology. — (Two hours per week.) 

Elective Studies. — (Eight hours, to be elected.) 

American Literature. — Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast); The Chief American Poets (Page); with lectures and class 
and private readings. (One hour per week.) 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week.) Or, 

Geology. — (Two hours per week.) 

Business Institutions. — Economic History of the United States 
(Bogart), supplemented by lectures and laboratory work. (Three 
hours per week throughout the year.) 

Chemistry. — Advanced. (Two hours per week.) 

Christian Evidences. — (Two hours per week, last fourth of the year.) 

Education. — Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week.) 
Electricity. — Laboratory. (Two hours per week.) 

English Drama. — Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 
week.) 

French. — Histoire de France (Michelet). L'Avare. French Short 
Stories (BufTum). (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 

hour, per week.) 

German. Goethe's Dramas and Longei Poems. (Three hours per 

week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust, (Three hours per week.) Non : This course 

is open onlj to students who have had at [east three years of 

( .( i man. 
History. Civilization in Europe. (Two hours pei week, throughout 

the year.) 
Inter I vw, International law. Text-book and lecturesi 

with the studs oi cases. I I w<» hours per week.) 
I \w . (Five hours pei week.) 
Mathematics, idvanced Calculus, one term; Differential Equations 

(Murray), two tei ms. I I hrei hours pei week.) 
Music. Lectures on the Theory ol Music, exercises in Sight Reading, 

and practical work In Harmonization. (Two hours pei week.) 

( )|)t ional i"i -ill i -t udents. 
I'nii ii < icm . (I Iik i hours pei week. ) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses of Instruction are given in some detail under Order of 
Studies, pages 25 to 38, so that each separate course given may be 
seen at once in connection with other courses in the same subject, 
which may have preceded or which are to follow; also in connection 
with courses in other subjects, which may be taken in connection with 
it. In this way the possibilities or election — or choice of work to be 
taken — are brought together in small compass for easy comparison. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

The college has modern, well-equipped recitation buildings in the 
Tome Scientific Building and Denny Memorial Hall. The Scientific 
Departments are well supplied with apparatus needed for their work, 
and their laboratories are ample in size and generous in equipment, 
while constant additions are being made to their appliances to meet 
the growing needs. 

The college stands definitely committed to the policy of employing 
only mature and tried instructors. Instruction by tutors finds no 
favor with the authorities of the college, and today its staff of instruc- 
tors is composed of mature men, each of whom has had years of expe- 
rience in the work in which he is now engaged. The college students 
are getting the benefit of the ripe experience of men whose lives have 
been devoted to the work of the classroom. 



Material Equipment 

Grounds and Buildings. — The campus includes a full square of the 
borough of Carlisle, purchased of the Penns by the Corporation. Upon 
it are grouped most of the buildings of the college proper. In addi- 
tion, the college owns the Law School building, Conway Hall, Denny 
Hall, South College, and Lloyd Hall; also a fine and well-equipped 
athletic field. The buildings are heated from a central steam plant 
and lighted by electricity. 

West College (1804), built of native limestone and trimmed with 
red sandstone, is 150 by 54 feet, and contains commodious accom- 
modations for the Young Men's Christian Association, and dormitories 
for sixty-five students. 

East College (1836), also of native limestone, 130 by 42 feet and 
four stories high, is used solely for dormitory purposes, and will accom- 
modate one hundred and ten students. 

The Jacob Tome Scientific Building (1884), the gift of the late 
Jacob Tome, of Port Deposit, Md., is of native limestone trimmed with 
Ohio sandstone and is 184 feet long by 56 feet wide. The west wing 
contains complete provisions for a college department of physics, 
including lecture-room, office of professor, private laboratory, large 
laboratory for general use, three smaller laboratories, a workshop, and 
minor apparatus rooms. The east wing contains similar ample pro- 
vision lor the chemical department, and the center is occupied by a 
large and handsome museum hall adapted to the preservation and 
display of the collections of the college. 

The James W. Bosler Memorial Library Hall (1885), is- an admi- 
rable structure in architectural design, as well as in material and con- 
struction. Il Was the gift to the College b\ the widow ol him wIiom' 

ii.iiim ii bears, and in whose honor ii was conceived ami built, the cost 
ol the furnished building being aboul $75,000.00. It supplies library 
accommodations, substantially (ire-proof, and an audience hall seal- 
ing eii'hi hundred persons. In this building the valuable library has 
not onl\ complete protection, but also tin- requisites i<'i convenient 
use and piopei display, with room i<>i growth. \ commodious ami 
< l< .mi reading* room is also pro> ided. 

I In- Denny Memoiial Building, OCCUpying the site ol the Inst 

Dennj Building destroyed March ;. [904, was completed and dedi- 
cated lum 6, 1905. Tin first storj is ol Hummelstown brownstone 
with th< second and thud stories <>i dark, Iron-clay, pressed brick, 
lectured in Ohio. The building ii distinctively memorial in character. In 
it .1 1 1 1 1< en la 1 1 recitation-rooms, each with an office adjoining, and, 

I 10 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

in addition, three large halls, for the use of the literary societies of the 
college, two of which date back more than one hundred years. The 
various rooms are designated as follows: KessIer-McFadden Hall, 
Smith Hall, Carroll Hall, Stephen Greene Hall, Harman Hall, Reed 
Hall, Patton Hall, Lindner Hall, Durbin Hall, Lawton Hall, Trick- 
ett Hall, Hoyt-Haight Hall, Prettyman Hall, McCrea-Earp Hall, 
Crider Hall, Crawford Hall, and Peirce Hall, each with an appropriate 
inscription tablet recording the name of the person in whose honor the 
Hall is named, together with that of the one establishing the memorial. 
The building contains also the lecture-room, laboratories, and collec- 
tions of the biological department of the college. The laboratories are 
large, exceptionally well lighted, and thoroughly equipped with 
microscopes, microtomes, and other apparatus essential to the work 
of this department. 

The Gymnasium furnishes accommodation for judicious physical 
training during the period of student-life. The main hall, 75 feet in 
length by 40 in width, is flanked on the eastern and western extremities 
by wings, of which the one, in dimensions 84 feet by 20, contains the 
baseball cage, while the other, 60 feet by 20, is used for offices, bathing- 
and dressing-rooms. It is provided with a running gallery, having a 
track of 235 feet in length, bathrooms, dressing-rooms, and offices, 
completely fitted up and furnished with proper appliances. 

Lloyd Hall is used for the accommodation of the young women 
attending the college. The building, of brick, with large grounds 
adjoining, is thoroughly furnished and provided with every comfort 
and convenience, and constitutes a beautiful and commodious home for 
ladies who are non-residents of the town. 

South College, on a lot 250 by 240 feet, is used for dormitory pur- 
poses, save the first floor, which is reserved for recitation-rooms, 
offices, and the College Commons. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Atlethic Field was the 
gift of the Hon. and Mrs. Edward W. Biddle, of Carlisle, in memory of 
their lamented son, Herman Bosler Biddle, class of 1903, and is a tract 
of land of more than six acres, located on the Chambersburg turnpike 
(Main street extension), easily accessible from the college, and admira- 
bly adapted to the purposes for which it has been prepared. The 
field is entered at the northeastern corner through a most artistically 
designed gateway. On the western side is a splendid grand stand, which 
will accommodate nine hundred and fifty spectators. In front of the 
grand stand stretches the straightaway track, 20 feet in width, form- 
ing a section of the quarter-mile track, every part of which is in full 
view of the stand. Within the ellipse formed by the track is located 
the diamond and gridiron required for baseball and football work. On 
the eastern side are five model tennis-courts. The field was dedicated 



42 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

with impressive ceremonies, June 8, 1909, and is one of the most beau- 
tiful and attractive athletic fields in the country. 

The College Commons, in South College, is a boarding depart- 
ment conducted by college students, where excellent board is furnished 
at cost rates. 

Todd Hospital, the gift of Mrs. Sarah A. Todd, is located in 
Carlisle, and is available for the use of students at any time. 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

The Library, available to all students, under established regula- 
tions, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — that of 
the college proper, which is exceedingly rich in old volumes and in 
reference books in certain departments — and those of the Belles Lettres 
and Union Philosophical Societies, accumulated by them during the 
century and more of their existence. These three libraries are one in 
organization, not only by reason of their arrangement, but by the 
registration of the books of all in a single catalog, on the card plan, 
which renders books in any of the collections easy of reference. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, of Cur- 
wensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of establishing a library 
Fund, together with the cordial co-operation of the Alumni Library 
Guild Association, the college is now able to make substantial addi- 
tions, annually, to the resources of the Library. 

The reading-room in the Library is furnished with the best of read- 
ing-room appliances. Its files are supplied with representatives of the 
best secular and religious papers, while many of the best American 
and foreign magazines are upon its tables. Si talents are t hus enabled 
to keep familiar with the daily news, and also to become acquainted 
with the best current literature of the world. 



General Regulations 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examination of candidates for admission will take place on Tues- 
day of Commencement week, and on the day before the opening of the 
Fall Term. 

Examinations will take place at the close of the Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Terms, at mid-year, or by special action of the Faculty, upon 
the completion of an integral part of any subject. 

DEGREES 

The following degrees in cursu will be conferred by the college on 
students now in the college: 

Bachelor oj Arts. — The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred 
on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Classical course. 

Bachelor oj Philosophy. — The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy will 
be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the 
Latin-Scientific and Philosophical courses. 

Bachelor of Science. — The degree of Bachelor of Science will be con- 
ferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Scientific 
course. 

On students of classes entering the college in September, 191 2, 
and thereafter, the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred on 
their completion of the Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Philosophical 
Courses; and the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred on 
such students on their completion of the Scientific Course. 

Master oj Arts. — The degree of Master of Arts in cursu will be con- 
ferred on those graduates of the college who shall have completed a 
course of study prescribed by the professors in the several departments 
and approved by the Faculty, and who shall have passed a satisfactory 
examination thereon at the seat of the college not later than May 15 
of any year. Examinations will be conducted in May of each year by 
the several professors under whose direction the studies shall have 
been pursued.' A charge of twenty dollars will be made for the exami- 
nation, one-half of which shall be payable when the student registers, 
which must be by October 15. Graduates of reputable colleges who 
shall complete in a satisfactory manner the course of the School of Law 
are eligible for the degree of Master of Arts, in cursu. All recipients of 
the degree will be charged the usual diploma fee of five dollars. Appli- 
cation for information respecting the Master's degree must be made 

(43) 



44 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

in writing to Dr. B. O. Mclntire, Chairman of Committee on Grad- 
uate Work. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Devotional services are held in the James W. Bosler Memorial 
Library Hall every morning, and all students are required to be present. 
Students are also required to attend the regular morning preaching 
services of the churches they elect. 



GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

The government and discipline of the college are vested exclu- 
sively in the Faculty of the college, although the regulation of certain 
functions which have particular reference to the life of the student- 
body is left largely to the determination of the students themselves. 
A copy of the Rules and Regulations, established by the Trustees for 
the government of the college and the ordering of her work, is placed in 
the hands of each student upon matriculation, and he or she is expected 
to conform to the rules and regulations to which they subscribe. 

Conduct inconsistent with the general good order of the institution 
may result in suspension, dismissal, or explusion. Any student found 
guilty of dishonesty in an examination or written recitation will be 
suspended for a period of not less than four weeks. Suspended students 
arc required to go to their homes, and parents or guardians are notified 
of the facts. 

Report of attention to college duties and of the deportment of each 
student is made at the close of each term to students personally, if of 

legal years, otherwise to parents or guardians. Special reports will 
be senl out whenever deemed necessary by the Faculty. 



COLLEGE BILLS 

IV, V.u 

General charge to students in college dormitories $100 oo 

( .< n( ral < barge '«> students not in college dormitories 85 00 

Room-rem $12 to ; > 00 

I aboratorj Botanical, ( Ihemical, Phj sical, Anatomical, or Zoolog*- 

< al) ea< h 1 ~ so 

I aboratoi \ Biological 5 00 

Atlifiic charge, unanimously recommended bj students s 00 

< foi I In Dickinsonian," unanimously recommended l>\ 

t udents . 1 00 

Students pi escn t in;' schola 1 ships will I ><■ eicditcd Oil : < nnal chains 

foi theii fa< < value. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 45 

LLOYD HALL 

For ladies residing in Lloyd Hall the total charge is $350 per year, 
payable in three installments within ten days of the opening of each 
term, or within ten days of their arrival. This sum — $350 — will cover 
all expenses for furnished rooms, bed-furnishing, lights, steam-heating, 
board; everything, indeed, save personal laundry, books, and labora- 
tory charges. All ladies, non-residents of the town, are expected to 
room in the Hall. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS, REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

When two students from the same family are present in the college 
at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent is made. 

Students who, at their own request, are permitted to room alone, 
are charged the full rent of the room. 

Students, non-resident in the town, who are permitted, for any 
reason, to room in the town, are charged at resident rates. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent themselves 
from college work for the whole or major portion of any term, and who 
present themselves for examination in said work, will be charged one- 
half of the regular rate. 

During the college year two bills are presented, one for the Fall 
term and the other covering the charges for the Winter and Spring 
terms combined. It should be observed that the Fall term bill is for 
two-fifths of the academic year, and the combined Winter and Spring 
term bill is for the remaining three-fifths. This latter may be paid in 
two installments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days following 
the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once and will be 
required by the noon of October 15 following. 

The combined Winter and Spring term bill will be presented within 
the ten days following the opening of the Winter term. Payment is 
expected at once and will be required by the noon of January 25. If 
paid in two installments, the one for the Winter term and the other 
for the Spring term, payments must be made by January 25 and by 
April 15, respectively. 

Extension 0/ time will not be granted for the payment of bills, unless 
written application on forms to be provided by the treasurer is made before 
the dates set for their payment. Failure to attend to this matter will render 
a student liable to exclusion from recitations or from college. No reduction 
on any term bill will be allowed for less than four weeks of continuous 
absence, for any cause, during any part of any term. For a period of 
absence in excess of four continuous weeks, a reduction of one-half the 
pro rata, or weekly, charge will be allowed. 



46 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

N. B. — Beginning with the academic year 1912-13, every student con- 
nected with the college, and every student proposing entrance, will be 
required to show a receipt signed by the treasurer of the college for the sum 
of ten dollars before being admitted to the work of the class with which he 
is associated, the said sum to appear as a credit on the college bill for the 
Fall term. The same rule will be observed at the opening of the Winter 
term. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, or 
money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

The rooms in the college are secured to the students during term 
time only. 

Damage. — The occupants of each room are held accountable for 
any damage to the room, and the cost must be paid promptly on 
presentation of bill. Any student proved to be guilty of wilful destruc- 
tion of, or damage to, college property, may be required to pay not 
only the cost of replacement, or repair, but also a fine as determined by 
the Faculty (not to exceed ten times the cost of repair), said fine to be 
placed to the credit side of the special damage account. When the 
students injuring property arc unknown, the cost of repairs is assessed, 
toward the close of the college year, upon the whole body of students, 
as a special damage account. 

No student can have honorable dismissal, or certificate of progress 
in his studies, until his bills have been duly adjusted. 



GOWNS, HOODS, AND CAPS 

The college has adopted the regulations for academic caps and 
-owns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 1895. 

1. Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black-stufl 
gown oJ the Oxford shape, bu1 with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occa- 
sions a black-stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood lined with red 
silk, crossed l>\ a che^ ron of white, six inches in breadl h. 

;. Masters oi Dickinson ( ollege may wear on all fitting occasions 
a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors. 

j. Doctors oi Dickinson College maj weai on all fitting occasions 
.1 black silk -own oi the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors, 
trimmed around the exterioi edge with a cord or with 1 band, not more 
than foui inches wide, oi silk, satin, 01 velvet, distinctive oi the depart 
in. ni to which ih. degree pertains, as follows: Doctoi of I tterature, 
.•. hite; Doctoi oi Divinity, scarlet; Doctoi <»i laws, purple; Doctoi oi 
Philosophy . Mm , Doctoi oi Science, gold-yellow. 

Wiih the gown will In worn the Oxford cap, oi serge foi undei 
; raduates and ■>! broadcloth !<>i graduates, with black tassels, exccpl 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 47 

the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of velvet with tassels in 
whole or part of gold thread. 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, during their 
term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the doctor's degree, with 
the hood appropriate to the degree that they severally have received. 
Members of the Board of Trustees, or of the Faculty, who have received 
degrees from other universities or colleges, shall be entitled to wear the 
costume appropriate to the same degree from Dickinson College, so 
long as they shall retain their official connection with the college. The 
President of the college may adopt such distinctive costume or badge 
as he shall choose, not inconsistent with the foregoing regulations. 



College Organizations 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The Belles Lettres and the Union Philosophical Societies, purely 
literary in their character, nearly coeval in origin with the founding 
of the college, have been maintained in continuous operation through- 
out its history. Harman Society, the organization of the young ladies, 
was founded in 1896. Not the least of the advantages of college resi- 
dence is the special training secured in these Societies. The halls in 
which they meet, ample in size and thoroughly equipped, are hardly 
surpassed anywhere. For nearly twenty years the work and worth 
of these Societies have been recognized in the following regulations: — 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical con- 
test in connection with the college who shall not have been a member 
of one of the literary societies for at least three-fourths of the time of 
his or her connection with the college. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of Com- 
mencement Day who shall not have been a member of one of the liter- 
ary societies for at least one-hall of the time of his or her connection 
with the college. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the college who shall not 
have made satisfactory adjustment of financial obligations to the 
literary society of which in- or she has been a member. 

BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY 

Officers: Presidenl Alfred H. Aldridge, ' 12. 
Vice-Presidem William A. Gunter, '13. 
Recording Secretai \ Clinton H. Miller, '14. 
( orresponding Set retarj .1. \ln ion Conovi r, ' 1 ]. 

Critu I. Fri 1 o \1 \i< 1 1\. '1 .'. 
( lei k Elton M. Mel nti m h, '14, 

ecutiv< < ommittei Howard W. Selby, '13; Russeli I .Bullock, 

'1 2. 

UNION PHI1 OSOPHICA1 SOCIETY 

« idem < h mo i •, \\ . Kitto, ' 1 1. 
Vice I 'i<- idem I n< im \ B, Brin h>\, ' 1 \. 

1 
Corn \ ki 1 1 1 it. ' 1 |. 

ure 1 '\i 1 1 I 
( mi. Paul R. Ri . '1 • 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 49 

UNION PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, continued 

Clerk — Emory B. Rockwell, '14. 
Censor — Wilson P. Sperow, '14. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Harry Evaul, '12. 

Executive Committee — Raymond W. Losey, '12; Charles Van 
Auken, '12; J. Roy Jackson, '14. 

HARMAN SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Helen A. Carruthers, '12. 
Vice-President — Iva Finton, '14. 
Secretary — Edith M. Tatnal, '13. 
Treasurer — Margaret H. Morgan, '14. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

These Associations in the college are well organized, and do a most 
useful work. A large number of the students are actively connected 
with them and are zealous to forward their work. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Carlton R. Van Hook, '12. 
Corresponding Secretary — Carl Hartzel, '13. 
Recording Secretary — Harry McKeown, Jr., '13. 
Treasurer — J. Warren Tilton. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Officers: President — Kathryn S. Drumm, '12. 
Vice-President — M. Elma Roberts, '12. 
Secretary — Maude E. Wilson, '13. 
Treasurer — Miriam W. Blair, '13. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



The trustees, in 1891, ordered that the alumni be divided into 
four geographical districts, centering respectively in Baltimore, Phila- 
delphia, Wilmington, and Carlisle, and that the alumni of each dis- 
trict elect a trustee, to be known as an Alumni Trustee, having all 
privileges of trustees of the college. These District Alumni Asso- 
ciations meet at such times as they may elect. There are also a General 
Alumni Association and various local associations. 



50 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

BALTIMORE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Harry L. Price, Esq. 

First Vice-President — Isaac T. Parks, Jr., Esq. 

Second Vice-President — Hon. Hammond Urner. 

Treasurer- — Carl F. New. 

Recording Secretary — William H. Davenport. 

Corresponding Secretary— Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. 

Executive Committee — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D.; J. Frederick 
Heisse, D.D.; James C. Nicholson, D.D.; David H. Carroll, 
D.D.; William W. Strong, Ph.D.; Hon. George R. Willis; 
Wilbur M. Pearce, M.D. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D. 

Address of Secretary, 915 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md. 

CARLISLE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Alexander H. Ege. 

Secretary and Treasurer — M. G. Filler. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 

Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Henry C. Longnecker, D.D.S. 
Vice-President— George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D. 
Secretary and Treasurer Thomas S. Lanard, Esq. 
Executive Committee Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq.; Frysinger Evans, 
Esq.; Charles K. Zug, Esq.; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq.; Rev. 
Thomas W. Davis; William P. Siki\(.. 
Representath e in the Board of Trustees Charles J* Hepburn, Esq. 
Address oi the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



WILMINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: Presidem Rev. Elmer L. Cross, Ped.D. 
\ u 1 I'm idem Hon. Thomas N. Rawlins. 

1 1 •< in nun re Kov. Kai imi T. Course y; Henry P. Cannon. 
Representative in the Board oi Lrustees Henr> I*. ( innon. 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Offia rsi Presidem Gen. I l<>i< \ 1 1<> ( . King, I I I > 

\ i< < I'm i<i< nt Mary C. Lovi Coli i\--. 

m 1. 11 \ MONTGOMBR) P. SbLLBI 

I m ill. I ( •:, .1 L. Kill., J (| 

\( l< 1 1 1 of Sec rc I 1 , Carli: l< . I' 1. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 51 

NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Harry J. Sondheim, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, 5 1 Chambers street, New York City. 

DICKINSON CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY 

Officers: President — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 
Vice-President — T. Leonard Hoover. 
Secretary and Treasurer — L. Wellington Johnson. 
Executive Committee — Rhey T. Snodgrass; Harry I. Huber, Esq.; 
Frank D. Lawrence; Thomas J. Towers, Esq.; L. Wellington 
Johnson. 

THE ALUMNI FUND COMMITTEE 

David H. Carroll, D.D., '68; Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; Charles 
K. Zug, Esq., '80; John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. Boyer, Esq., '88; 
Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; William A. 
Jordan, Esq., '97; Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. Burchenal, 
Esq., '00; T. Leonard Hoover, '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00; George 
H. Bonner, Esq., '01 ; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Frank D. Lawrence, '02. 
Officers: Chairman — Henry P. Cannon, Bridgeville, Del. 

Vice-Chairman — George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D., Woodbury, N. J. 
Secretary — Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa. 
Treasurer — Montgomery P. Sellers, '93, Carlisle, Pa. 
Executive Committee — Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; 
Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; 
T. Leonard Hoover, '00; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Frank D. 
Lawrence, '02; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00, Secretary, 1242 Land 
Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

In September, 1886, the Alpha Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, the first in the State of Pennsylvania, was organized. Only 
students finally passed for graduation are eligible to membership, and 
of these only those of high class standing or giving promise of unusual 
achievement. Graduates of former years, not below the first fourth of 
their classes, and men of eminence in professional life, are also eligible 
to membership. 

Officers: President — Henry F. Whiting. 
Vice-President — Mervin G. Filler. 
Secretary — John F. Mohler. 
Treasurer — Forrest E. Craver. 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

THE DICKINSON LIBRARY GUILD 

The Dickinson Library Guild is a body composed of alumni and 
friends of Dickinson College, organized for the purpose of creating 
a permanent endowment for the College Library. Membership in 
the Guild shall consist of all persons who pledge an annual contribution 
to the permanent endownment fund of the Library. The membership 
shall be classified into five classes, or groups, as follows: 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 

B, " " from five to ten 

" C, " "■ " three " " " 

«. Dj « « « tWQ « « « 

u E> « « u Qne „ « u 

In accordance with the action of the Board of Trustees of the col- 
lege, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the permanent 
endowment fund of the Library, the proceeds of which shall be devoted 
to the sole purpose of purchasing books by the Faculty Committee on 
Library. The current expenses of the organization shall be otherwise 
provided for. 
Directors: President — Bradford O. McIntire. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 

John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; J. Kirk Bosler, Esq., '97; J. Freed 
Martin, '12. 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 

For some years the students in their organized capacity have exer- 
cised limited government over some of their own internal interests. Tins 
student government has applied especially to relations of one class with 
another, bul has also influenced the life of the entire student-body. 

The student organization Is called the Student Assembly, and the 
elected governing bod) is called the Senate. 

Senate David H. Biddle, 'ia; Karri I \ \i 1 . ' 1 1 ; John I . Fi 1 roN, 'ia; 

ROB! i< 1 A. GARTON, 'l 5; I . I IMONl ( .1 IS9ING1 R, '1 | ; John A. I . I I \i 1 . ' 1 1 

I ). A 1 in n 1 Mi D I KARL! I W. k 1 1 1 < >, ' 1 .< , EDWIN I >. Si ki 1 1 , 

I LWOOD G. I tBOR, 1 > . < \ki i< >N K. \ \\l look. '. 1 .\ 

o//m ( / 1; Presidenl J< »hn I . I 1 1 1 « • .. ' 1 1, 

\ 1. < l'i < ■• n It-Mi I ). A 1 10 i< 1 Henderson, *i 2 
I 11 1 mi 1 Charles W. KiTTO, *ia. 
etarj Joh *l. F. Hall, 'ia. 

THE COLLEGE HAND 

In the autumn "I 1908 several <>i the more musically inclined 
studt lit'- set <>n foot tin movement whi< h at length brought into exist- 
ence the present Colli 1 Band. Originally simply a means of helping 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 53 

on the singing at the football games, it has outgrown its former plan 
and is now one of the regular musical organizations of the college. 
It furnishes the music for all college functions, and during the Fall and 
Spring terms gives concerts on the campus. Any student with musical 
ability is eligible to membership. Instruction is provided for beginners, 
and students are encouraged to take up this sort of work. 
Officers: President — Alfred H. Aldridge, '12. 

Director — Walter A. Beaven, '12. 

Vice-President — G. Leroy Moorehead, '12. 

Secretary — Carl Hartzel, '13. 

Treasurer — Walter A. Hearn, '14. 

Librarian — Charles E. Wagner, '14. 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Howard S. Rogers, '13, Law. 
Vice-President — Harvey H. Steckel, '12. 
Secretary — Hiester R. Hornberger, '15. 
Treasurer — W. Howard Sharp, '13. 
Assistant Treasurer — Fred L. Mohler, '14. 
Advisory Committee — Henry M. Stephens, Carlisle 

William W. Landis, Carlisle. 

Forrest E. Craver, Carlisle. 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr., Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 19 12.) 

William D. Boyer, Esq., Scranton. 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

J. Kirk Bosler, Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

Raphael S. Hays, Carlisle. 

(Term will expire 1914-) 

Edward M. Biddle, Esq., Philadelphia. 

(Term will expire 1912.) 

Football Manager — Foster E. Brenneman, '14. 
Assistant — Wilson P. Sperow, '14. 
Baseball Manager — Joseph M. Shuck, '13. 
Assistant — Emory B. Rockwell, '14. 
Manager Outdoor Sports — Richard A. Shields, '12. 
Manager Indoor Sports— R. Bruce Paterson, '13. 
Captain Football Team — Francis A. Dunn, '14. 
Captain Baseball Team — B. S. Nork, '13, Law. 
Captain Track Team — Robert A. Garton, '13. 
Captain Gymnastic Team — W. Moffet Smith, '12. 
Captain Tennis Team — S. Carroll Miller, '12. 



Prizes, Scholarships, and 
Beneficiary Funds 

PRIZES 

The Frank Beers Memorial Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift 
of Mrs. Nathan T. Beers, New York City, is awarded to that member 
of the Senior class whose oration, in a public contest on Commencement 
Day, seems second best in composition and delivery. Each oration 
must contain not more than one thousand words, and must be left 
with the President on or before the first Tuesday in May. Discon- 
tinued after 191 1. 

Divided between Howard E. Thompson, Sherwood, Md., and J. 
Arthur Wright, Coatesville. 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improvement 
in composition and declamation at an early stage in the college course, 
the literary societies have each instituted a yearly contest therein for 
their respective members from the Sophomore class. All the members 
of this class in the Belles Lettres Society have the option of competing, 
and a gold medal is awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest 
degree of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, as 

decided by judges ehosen by the society. 

Awarded to B. Olcott McAnney, Carlisle. 

The Biology Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of a friend, is 
awarded for excellence in the work of the Department of Biology, 
during I he Junior 01 Senioi \ eat . 

Awarded to \\ . Carlton PhareS, Trenton, N. J, 

The Caldwell Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of James 
Hope Caldwell, '80, <>l New York City, Is awarded to the male student 
oi the Department ol Oratory, who shall, in a public contest, excel in 
1 1( 1 1. 1n1.it ion, cit bei forensic <»r dramatic. 

Awarded t<> I. Stanley Dean, Mtoona. 

Tin- Cannon Prize oi twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henrj P. ( an- 
non, oi Bridgeville, Del., Is awarded to thai membei of the Sophomore 
class who shall pass the most satisfactory examination in the Mathe- 
matics "I the Sophomon /ear, togethei with the original Geometry 

ol tin I n ■ Inn. in \ 1 .1 1 . 

Divided betwe< n I Ida R, Park, I aParfc, and \\ . MofTett Smith, 
lamesburg, V .1. 

The Clemens Prlzeoi twenty five dollars, the gift oi the Rev. 
Joseph ( li mm us, 'o 1. < haplain I nitcd States ^rmy, is awarded annuall) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

to the student of the Junior class, proposing the work of the ministry, 
who writes the best essay, or sermon, upon some subject bearing upon 
the work of foreign missions, the essay or sermon not to exceed one 
thousand and five hundred words, and to be presented to the President 
of the college not later than May i of each year. A copy of the winning 
essay or sermon, in typewritten form, shall be forwarded to the donor 
of the prize. 

Awarded to Carlton R. Van Hook, Millville, N. J. 

The Dare Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the college, is 
awarded to that member of the graduating class of the Conway Hall Pre- 
paratory School who shall be found to have attained the highest excel- 
lence in the studies preparatory to any course of Dickinson College. 

Awarded to David Rhea Coffman, Scotland. 

The Johnson Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph H. 
Johnson, '05, of Milton, Pa., is awarded to that one of the literary 
societies of the college whose members shall excel in debate, said debate 
to* be conducted according to the terms proposed by the Faculty, and 
adopted by the respective societies. 

1- Awarded to the Union Philosophical Society, represented by Charles 
W. Kitto, Pen Argyl; William B. Landis, Rock Glen; Howard E. 
Thompson, Sherwood, Md. 

The Johnson Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of Willis Fletcher 
Johnson, L.H.D., of New York City, is awarded to the male student 
who shall stand second in a public contest in declamation, either 
forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Wilson P. Sperow, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

The McDaniel Prizes. Delaplaine McDaniel, Esq., late of Phil- 
adelphia, provided for the founding of certain scholarships, to be 
awarded on the ground of excellence in scholarship. The sum of five 
thousand dollars was given the college in trust, with provision that 
three prizes, equal in amount, be constituted from the annual income, 
and offered yearly to be competed for by the members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes, and with provision, further, that two of these 
prizes be awarded, one each, to the two members of the former class, 
and the remaining prize to the member of the latter class, who, in 
such way as the authorities of the college prescribe, attains the highest 
average of excellence in the work of these classes respectively. 

Freshman class — First prize, Samuel L. Mohler, Carlisle. Second 
prize, Lester W. Auman, Mifflintown. 

Sophomore class — Mary B. Robinson, Shippensburg. 

The McLean Prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded to the female 
student of the Department of Oratory, who shall, in a public contest, 
excel in declamation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Margaret M. Thompson, Carlisle. 



56 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Miller Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles O. Miller, 
Esq., of Stamford, Conn., is awarded to that member of the Freshman 
class who shall excel in forensic declamation. 

Awarded to Donald W. Carruthers, Carlisle. 

The Musser Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of Miss Minnesota 
Estelle Musser, of New York City, will be awarded to the female 
student who shall stand second in a public contest in declamation, 
either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Manetta E. Kilmore, Mechanicsburg. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes, four in number, of twenty- 
five dollars each, one for each of the college classes, offered by the late 
Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a memorial to his father, General 
John Patton, for many years a faithful friend and trustee of the college, 
are awarded according to conditions established for the Patton Scholar- 
ship Prizes maintained for many years by his honored father, 

Senior class — Awarded to Jennie D. Shenton, Carlisle. 

Junior class — Awarded to Ernest H. Sellers, Carlisle. 

Sophomore class — Divided between Elda R. Park, La Park, and 
Edith S. Rinker, Carlisle. 

Freshman class — Awarded to Foster E. Brenneman, Carlisle. 

The Pierson Prizes for oratory, established by Daniel Pierson, 
Esq., of Newark, N. J., gold and silver medals, are offered each year 
to be competed for by members of the Junior class in a public 
oratorical contest, which contest has for years been placed among the 
exercises of Commencement week. 

Gold Medal Charles \\ . K.tto, Pen Ar-vl. Silver Medal Russell 

I . Bullock, Last M.iuch Chunk. 

The Rees Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the Rev. Milton S. 
Rees, I). I)., Rochester, N. V., is awarded to that student who shall 

e» el in English Bible. 

Awarded to. lames 1 1. I [ughes, Jr., Felton, Del, 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize ol lilt\ dollars, the 
m'lt ol General .lames Fowlei Rusling, I I.I)., '54, rrenton, N. J., 
is awarded t.. thai member of the Senioi class who, at tin- end ol a 
i«»m years' course, shall l>e found t<» excel in scholarship and character, 

as d< t< i ii d bj i he Faculty . 

Award d i.. luh. i Mi. i in, ( .11 [isle. 
I In Kv.i Fishei Suvi<lf»r Prize ol loit\ dollars, the gift ol lhm\ 

W. Sa id • . I q., ol Sunbury, Pa., in memory ol bis wife, Evs Fishei 
awarded ai firsl prize to that membei ol th< Senioi class 
oration, in a publi< contest on Commencement !>a\. seems 
M » omposit ion and d< Ii> < i j . 
Awarded to \\ illiam B. I andis, I i < >i k ( .l< n. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 57 

The Smith Prize of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert Hays Smith, 
'98, of San Francisco, Cal., is awarded as a second prize, to be distrib- 
uted equally among the members of the winning team in the annual 
Inter-society debate. 

Awarded to the winners of the Johnson prize above. 

Department of Business Institutions and Sociology. Business 
Institutions — William B. Landis, "Short Stories;" Percy L. Vosburg, 
"United Netherlands;" Clarence A. Fry, "Grant's Memoirs." 
Sociology — Miss Emily Milburn, "Whistler;" Earl D. Willey, "Pres- 
cott's Mexico;" Fred L. Andrus, "French Revolution." 

Traveling Scholarship Prize of two hundred and fifty dollars was 
awarded for the academic year 1911-12, to that member of the Senior 
class of the college who had excelled in German Language and Liter- 
ature, the scholarship to be used as a traveling scholarship for purposes 
of graduate study. The prize was the joint gift of Professors George 
A. Crider and Cornelius W. Prettyman. 

Awarded to Bertha S. Globisch, Lancaster. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. As an incentive to improve- 
ment in composition and declamation at an early stage in the college 
course, the literary societies have each instituted a yearly contest 
therein for their respective members from the Sophomore class. All 
the members of this class in the Union Philosophical society have 
the option of competing, and a gold medal is awarded the con- 
testant exhibiting the highest degree of excellence in the arts to 
which the competition relates, as decided by judges chosen by the 
society. 

No contest in 191 1. 

The Wagg Prize of fifty dollars, the gift of A. H. Wagg, '09, 
of New York, is awarded to that member of the class in Economics 
who excels in that subject. 

Awarded to John L. Felton, Everett. 

The Wallace Prize of twenty-five dollars, established 1907, by 
Prof. Samuel B. Wallace, Ped.D., '90, Atlanta, Ga., is awarded to 
the student who shall excel in some phase of English work as deter- 
mined by the professor of rhetoric and the English language. 

Awarded to H. Lauretta Stauffer, Lancaster. 

The Walkley Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of W. R. Walkley, 
D.C.L., in memoriam of his only son, Winfield Davidson Walkley, 
who died March 11, 1903, is awarded as a second prize to that member 
of the Freshman class who shall excel in declamation, either forensic 
or dramatic. ' 

Awarded to Clyde H. Hughes, Carlisle. 

The Weber Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Edward Y. 



58 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Weber, Esq., of New York, was awarded to that student who excelled 
in the Civics of the Sophomore year, 1910-11. Discontinued after 
1911. 

Awarded to Mary B. Robinson, Shippensburg. 

BENEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumni Loan Fund. An alumnus of the college, who is 
deeply interested in her welfare, has recently made a contribution of 
fifty dollars as an Alumni Loan Fund, with the following purpose: It 
is proposed to loan this fund from year to year to students in need of a 
little temporary help — preferably to those well advanced in the college 
course — with the understanding that it be repaid within a year, to be 
used in helping some one else in like need. In this way the money in 
this fund is expected to help new students each year. 

It is a wisely devised plan, and may well encourage other friends 
of the college to make similar helpful use of their means. Even small 
contributions will be gladly received, and added to others, may be of 
inestimable value to struggling young people. 

Not awarded in 191 1. 

Baltimore Medical College Scholarship. On September 10, 
1904, the Baltimore Medical College, Baltimore, Md., decided to 
grant a scholarship in that college for the use and benefit of Dickinson 
College, said scholarship to be filled each year by a graduate of Dickin- 
son College, nominated by the President thereof, and to be available 
loi the appointee lor the Inst year of his four years' course in the 
medical college. The holder of tin- scholarship lor the year will be 

exempted from tuition and examination lees, but will be held loi 

matriculation fee, laboratory lees, and laboratory deposit, the three 
items amounting in all to twenty-five dollars. 

The Bodine Scholarship of fifty dollars, established [906, by 
George I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia, through the gift of one 
thousand dollars, will be awarded annually to young men and women 

whom the President may deem most \\oith\ ol eonsiderat ion, or who 

m.i\ lx designated b) the donoi of the scholarship. 

Awarded to S. Russell Brj son. 

The Artini! Milby Burton Scholarship ot 1 1 1 1 \ (loll. iis, was estab 
lished April 1. ion, l»\ Miss Marj R, Burton, lor the education oi 
worth} young nun foi the ministry, preference being given t<> appli- 
cants residing within the limits ol the Philadelphia Conference to be 
d< <l loi the first timeat the close of the yeai ion 1 t, 

The Carlisle High School Scholarship oi fortj dollars, th< 
ol the college, will hereaftei be awarded al the close ol the Freshman 
veai i<> tin student from the high school ol ( arlisle who, on entering, 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

shall present a certificate from the principal of the high school, showing 
that the bearer, on graduation, had attained the highest rank in 
scholarship. 

Awarded to Foster E. Brenneman. 

The Chandler Scholarship of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
D. Harry Chandler, Esq., of Vineland, N. J., will be awarded, annually, 
at the discretion of the President, to the young man or woman depend- 
ent largely upon personal resources, whom he may deem most worthy 
of consideration. 

Awarded to Raymond E. Marshall. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship of fifty 
dollars, established in 1906 by Mrs. Emma L. Keen, of Philadelphia, 
as a memorial to her honored father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, 
through the gift of one thousand dollars, will be awarded, at the dis- 
cretion of the President, to assist young men preparing for the Chris- 
tian ministry, whom he may deem most worthy of consideration, or 
who may be designated by the donor of the scholarship. 

Awarded to George H. G. Rowland. 

The Scholarship of one hundred dollars, the 

gift of a lady of New York City, was divided between Paul R. Renn 
and Carrie S. Smith. 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, of 
New York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, will be awarded 
annually to the young man or young woman, dependent largely upon 
his or her own resources, whom the President may deem most worthy 
of consideration, students from New York City and vicinity to have 
prior claim. 

Awarded to Carlyle R. Earp. 

The J. W. Feight Memorial Fund. The proceeds of this fund — 
the annual interest of one thousand dollars — the gift of J. W. Fisher, 
Esq., of Newport, Tennessee, in loving memory of the character and 
services of the Reverend J. W. Feight, formerly a member of the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
is bestowed, subject to the judgment of the President, upon such 
worthy students as are dependent largely upon their own resources, 
and who shall have attained high average excellence in the studies 
of the year in any one of the courses offered in the college. In con- 
nection with the award, the following conditions are observed: First, 
the student receiving the prize shall, if possible, be from within the 
bounds of the Central Pennsylvania Conference. If from any other 
territory, that of the Baltimore Conference shall be preferred. Second, 
the award shall be, as far as possible, in the form of a loan, to be 
returned to the treasurer of the fund as soon as possible after the gradu- 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

ation of the student; interest on the loan to begin two years after the 
date of graduation. 

Divided between Lester W. Auman and Wesley P. Griffiths. 

The Freeman Scholarship of fifty dollars, established in 1906 by 
Frank A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia, is awarded annually, at 
the discretion of the President, to aid young men and women whom he 
may deem most worthy of consideration, or who may be designated by 
the donor of the scholarship. 

Awarded to E. Lamont Geissinger. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, endowed in the sum 
of one thousand dollars, the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of 
John Gillespie, Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her father. 
The interest on the endowment is awarded in each year to a student, or 
students, of the college, dependent quite largely upon their own resour- 
ces, whom the president or faculty may deem most worthy of con- 
sideration. 

Divided between William H. Robinson and Wesley P. Griffiths. 

The Samuel B. Goff Temperance Scholarships, three in number, 
the first of fifty dollars, the second of thirty, and the third of t\\vnt\ , 
the gift of Samuel B. Goff, Esq., of Camden, N. J., is awarded during 
the academic year to the students of the college who shall excel in 
orations, to be publicly delivered, upon some phase of temperance 
work in the United States. 

Awarded, first prize, $50, to Howard E. Thompson, Williamstown; 
second prize, $30, to C. LcRoy Cleaver, Mt. Carmel; third prize, $20, 
to Alfred II. Aldridge, Fayetteville. 

Note. The purpose of Mr. Goff is, in the mar future, to endow 
a I ectureship in the college, in the sum of five thousand dollars, but 
as the intrust available for the past yeai amounted bo but one 
hundred dollars, the oratorical contesl took the place of the I ecture- 
ship. 

The Mary Louise Huntington Fund. This fund, tin- gift of Miss 
Mar} Louise Huntington, of Brooklyn, Nev York, will be used, .it 
th< dis< n tion oi the President, to aid young nun of limited means who 
.m preparing foi missionary, ministerial, oi educational work. 

\ot awarded in 1911. 

Thr King Scholarship is awarded, annually, to the graduate of 
the high school, Washington, I). ( ., who maj be selected l>\ the 
principal, foi excellence in th< studies preparatory to entrance in 
Dickinson ( ollege, the Scholarship t<» !><■ enjoyed onlj during the 
• 1 udi hi '■■ I r< ■ Inn. in year. 

rded, [910 11, to H. Munson ( oi ning, 
1 in- Lockyei Scholarship oi fiftj dollars, established bj Mark B. 
er, I <!■• ol Philadelphia, is awarded, at the discretion ol the 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 61 

President, to the student whom he may deem most worthy of the 
scholarship. 

Divided between H. Elmore Smith and J. Warren Tilton. 

The Jackson Scholarships (two in number) of fifty dollars each, 
established by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jackson, of Berwick, Pa., in memory 
of her husband, the late Col. Clarence Gearhart Jackson, and as part 
condition of a gift of ten thousand dollars, is awarded annually, at the 
close of the Freshman year, to students of the college who, coming 
from Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, on entering present certificates 
from the headmaster of the said seminary, showing that the bearers 
have attained the highest rank in scholarship, the scholarships to be 
good for the Freshman year. 

Awarded to Victor C. Wise and H. Cheston Hicks. 

The Theodore F. Miller Scholarship of fifty dollars, the gift 
of Theodore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia, is awarded annually, 
at the discretion of the President, to young men and women dependent 
largely upon their own resources, whom he may deem most worthy of 
consideration, or who may be designated by the donor of the scholar- 
ship. 

Awarded to Harry Evaul. 

The Norristown (Pa.) High School Scholarship of forty dollars, 
the gift of the college, will hereafter be awarded at the close of the 
Freshman year to the student of the high school of Norristown, who, 
on entering, shall present a certificate from the principal of the said 
high school, showing that the bearer on graduation had attained the 
highest rank in scholarship, the scholarship to be good for the Fresh- 
man year. 

Not awarded in 191 1. 

The Valeria Schall Scholarship of twenty-five dollars is to be 
used for scholarship purposes in assisting in the education of such young 
men as, in the estimation of the President and Faculty of the college, 
are of good character, scholarly habits, and deserving of assistance, 
and who are approved candidates for the Christian ministry. 

The scholarship will be awarded for the first time at the close of the 
year 1911-12. 

The Charles T. Schoen Scholarships, ten in number, and each 
of the value of fifty dollars, established by Charles T. Schoen, Esq., 
of Philadelphia, by his pledge of ten thousand dollars, are awarded 
annually to young men or women, dependent largely upon their own 
resources, whom the President may deem worthy of consideration or 
who may be designated by the donor. 

Awarded to Harry E. Brumbaugh, Frank C. Bunting, Donald C. 
Stickel, D. Ralph Sieber, Victor C. Wise, Franklin A. KuIIer, Alfred 



62 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

H. Aldridge, Thomas H. Ford, Blanche M. Galley, J. Morris Hewitt, 
and Homer C. Holland. 

The A. Herr Smith Fund. The proceeds of this fund (averaging 
one hundred dollars per year), the gift of the late Miss Eliza E. Smith, 
of Lancaster, in memory of her brother, the late Hon. A. Herr Smith, 
a distinguished graduate of the college, and as a part condition of a gift 
by Miss Smith of ten thousand dollars is bestowed upon that student 
of the college dependent largely upon his own resources, whom the 
President may deem most worthy of consideration. 

Divided among Ira S. Huber, Karl Kirsch, and Harvey O. Gish. 

The Cornelia A. Thumm Fund. The proceeds of this fund, the 
annual interest of nine hundred and fifty dollars, the legacy of Mrs. 
Cornelia A. Thumm, late of Philadelphia, will be used at the discre- 
tion of the President, to aid young men and women, dependent 
largely upon their own resources, whom he may deem most worthy of 
consideration. 

Divided between Cora L. Handwork and Jay D. Cook. 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship (endowed) of fifty dollars, 
established 1910 by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, through 
the gift of one thousand dollars is awarded annually to young nun 
or women whom the President may deem worthy of consideration, 
or who may be designated by the donor of the scholarship. 

The Rev. William Wood Scholarship of fifty dollars, the gift 
of Miss Wood, of Trenton, N. J., will be awarded to the young man 
or woman whom the President ma\ diem most worthy of consider- 
ation, or who may be designated by the donor. 

Awarded to Allan F. Bubeck. 

KNDOWKD SCHOLARSHIPS 

The trustees bave authorized the founding of endowed scholarships 

0i 1 Him SAND DOl 1 MIS 1 \< H, whose object is to aid in extending 

the privileges <>l the college to young men of promise' otherwise unable 
t<> ( ommand t hem, 

Su< h '-( holarships may l>e constituted as follows: 

1 . I Ik don 01 0! (.nh scholarship shall have the privilege ol naming 
it, .mil ol prescribing the conditions on which it shall Ik- awarded. 

•. Scholarships maj l>< maintained l)\ the annual payment of !ilt\ 
• loll. 11 , ., ml. rest, until the piiiu ipal sum ol one thousand dollars is 

1 Mid. I In \ lapse, "l i on isc, when the interest fails, unless the princi- 
pal <>i interest on 1 1 1 • same has been paid. 

;. ( Inn. In . out 1 il nit in;' oik thousand dollais rath. ma\. il thc\ 
t. plaCl np<»n that Ioiiik l.i t ion t Ik sons ol then miuist ci s, 01 . in 

In 11 ol ih.it, r 1 1 . 1 \ nominate some othei candidate to receive its avails. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 63 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 

the laws. of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof shall be sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 
the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and, premises, 

that is to say , to have and to 

hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its successors 
and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, or 
knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the Presi- 
dent of the college, Eugene Allen Noble, Carlisle, Pa., and, if prac- 
ticable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes of the 
testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or 
the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endowment of a 
scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of the same in the 
will provision. 



Index 



PAGE 

Admission 20 

Admission, Requirements for. 21-24 

Alumni Associations 49~S l 

Alumni Fund Committee 51 

Alumni Statistics 7 

Athletic Association 53 

Athletic Field 41 

Bills, College 44-46 

Calendar for 191 1-1912 4 

Calendar, College 5-6 

Certificates 20 

Courses of Study 19 

Degrees 43 

Degrees Conferred, 1911 16-18 

Examinations 20 and 43 

Expenses 44-46 

Faculty, College 12-14 

Government and Discipline .... 44 

Gowns, Hoods, and Caps 46 

Grounds and Buildings 40 

Gymnasium 41 

Library 42 

Library Guild 52 



PAGE 

Literary Societies 48, 49 

Lloyd Hall 41 

Material Equipment 40-42 

Methods of Instruction 39 

Organizations, College 48-53 

Order of Studies 25-38 

Freshman Class 25-27 

Sophomore Class 27-30 

Junior Class 3 1-35 

Senior Class 36-38 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 51 

Prizes 54~58 

Scholarships 58-62 

Scholarships Endowed 62 

Senate and Assembly, Student . . 52 

South College 41 

Trustees, Board of 8-1 1 

Visitors 15 

Worship, Public 44 

Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion 49 

Young Women's Christian 

Association 49 






J. Horace McFarland Company, Harrisburg, Pa> 




w 



Bttfemson College 
milttin 



Vol. VII 



NOVEMBER, 1912 



The Catalogue 

1912-1913 



No. 3 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY— MAY— JULY 
NOVEMBER 



tered a* eecond-claM matter. January 19. 1906, at the post-office at Carlisle, Pa, 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



as 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



CATALOGUE OF 

Bttfemson College 

1912-1913 
130th Annual Session 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

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COLLEGE CALENDAR— 1912-1913 



FALL TERM— 1912 

September 18, Wednesday Entrance examination. 

September 19, Thursday Fall Term begins. 

September 20, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

December 8-14 Week of Prayer in College. 

December 20, Friday, 10.30 a.m Fall Term ends. 



WINTER TERM— 1913 

January 3, Friday, 8.30 a.m Winter Term begins. 

January 17, Friday Inter-Society Debate. 

February 21, Friday Freshman Contest for Miller and 

Walkley Prizes. 

March 7, Friday. . . .• Intercollegiate Debates with Frank- 
lin and Marshall and Pennsylvania 
State Colleges. 

March 20, Thursday, 10.30 a.m Winter Term ends. 



SPRING TERM— 1913 

April 1, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Spring Term begins. 

April 25, Friday Sophomore Oratorical Contest of the 

Belles Lettres and Union Philo- 
sophical Literary Societies. 

May 23-29 Senior final examinations. 

June 2-7 Final examinations of the Junior, 

Sophomore, and Freshman classes. 

June 4, Wednesday Commencement exercises of Conway 

Hall — School for Boys. 

June 7, Saturday, 8 p.m Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 

Prizes. 

June 8, Sunday, 1 1 a.m Baccalaureate sermon by President 

Noble. 

6.30 p.m Campus song service. 

7.30 p.m Address before the College Christian 

Associations. 

(5) 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SPRING TERM— 1913, continued 

June 9, Monday, 2 p.m Senior Class Day exercises. 

4 p.m Annual meeting of the Incorporators 

of the School of Law. 

4 p.m Commencement play by Dramatic 

Club. 

7 p.m Annual meeting of the Trustees of the 

College. 

8 p.m Concert by the musical organizations 

of the College. 

io p.m Junior Promenade. 

June io, Tuesday, 9.30 a.m Class reunions, followed by Alumni 

Association meetings. 

5.00 p.m Meeting of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

8-1 1 p.m President's Reception. 

June 11, Wednesday, 8.15 a.m College Chapel and Class advance- 
ments. 
9.30 a.m Commencement exercises of the Col- 
lege and School of Law. 
12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 



FALL TERM— 1913 

September 1 7, \\ ednesdaj Examinations for admission. 

September 18, Thursday, 10.30 km.. Fall Term begins. 
December [9, Friday, 10.30 \.\i Fall Term ends. 



WINTER TERM — 1914 
January 2, Friday, 8.30 \.m Winter Term begins 



ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total 5,4 TI 

Legal profession 1,040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of the United States 1 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 3 

Attorney-Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 39 

Members of State Assemblies 132 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 3 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church 1 

Presidents of colleges 42 

Heads of professional schools 10 

Professors in colleges 135 

Superintendents of schools 66 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools 260 

Instructors in lower-grade schools 610 

Note. — This record, it should be observed, does not fully express the useful work 

done by the College, as in the earlier days of the institution the records were but indif- 
ferently preserved, and as it was last revised more than two years ago. 

(7) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., Ex-officio. 



REPRESENTATIVES-AT-LARGE 
FRANK C. BOSLER Carlisle 

(Term will expire 191 3.) 

Gen. HORATIO C. KING, LL.D Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Term will expire 1914.) 

JOHN A. SECOR New York City 

(Term w'ill expire 1915.) 

WILLIAM D. BOYER, Esq Scranton 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

REPRESENTATIVES OF BALTIMORE DISTRICT 
Rev. Bishop LUTHER B. WILSON, D.D., LL.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 191 3.) 

THOMAS C. SMITH, M.D Washington, D. C 

(Term will expire 191 5.) 

Hi v. LUTHER T. WIDERMAN, D.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term w ill expin 
>REV. DAVID II. CARROLL, DA^> Baltimore. Mil. 

ill \in M. \\ II son. M.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term "ill expii e 1913.) 

J. HENRY BAKER, Esq. Baltimore, Md. 

'him u ill expin I'd 1 

1 \ \< Md ' 1:1 1 ^ . Esq Baltimore, Md. 

I I IP III Will I \ ||l| ! I'll , 



mi 1 SENTATIVES 01 PHI! ADELPHIA DISTRICT 

i: i RANK B. LYNCH, D.D Philadelphia 

••• iii ■ \\> ii'' 

Ho I I si il M. MIAW Philadelphia 

'. ill < \\ X I 

•Ri v. WIL1 (AM I I'.osw ELL, D.l >. Philadelphia 

( ii \m ES K. ZUG, Esq Plni.Mlrli.lu:, 

.-. ill eipin <<>< \ 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 9 

REPRESENTATIVES OF PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT, continued 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1914.) 

Rev. FRANKLIN F. BOND, D.D Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1916.) 

BOYD LEE SPAHR, Esq Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1914.) 



REPRESENTATIVES OF CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 
DISTRICT 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE Carlisle 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

JOHN P. MELICK Harrisburg 

(Term will expire 191 3.) 

JOSEPH J. BAUGHMAN New Cumberland 

(Term will expire 191 3.) 

Rev. WILLIAM W. EVANS, D.D Washington, D. C. 

(Term will expire 1914.) 

Rev. WILLIAM A. STEPHENS, D.D Carlisle 

(Term will expire 191 4.) 

C. PRICE SPEER Chambersburg 

(Term will expire 19 14.) 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, Jr., Esq Carlisle 

(Term will expire 191 4.) 

WILLIAM L. WOODCOCK, Esq Altoona 

(Term will expire 1916.) 

REPRESENTATIVES OF NEW JERSEY DISTRICT 
Hon. EDWARD C. STOKES Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

*Rev. BENJ. C. LIPPINCOTT, D.D Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Rev. WILLIAM P. DAVIS, D.D Camden, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1913.) 

Rev. GEORGE B. WIGHT, D.D Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 191 3.) 

Gen. JAMES F. RUSLING, LL.D Trenton, N. J. 

(Term will expire 1916.) 

GEORGE D. CHENOWETH, Sc.D Woodbury, N. J. 

(Term will expire 191 5.) 
^Deceased. 



10 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

REPRESENTATIVES OF WILMINGTON DISTRICT 
MELVILLE GAMBRILL Wilmington, Del. 

(Term will expire 1916.) 

Rev. THOMAS E. MARTINDALE, D.D Salisbury, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

Rev. CORNELIUS W. PRETTYMAN, D.D Centreville, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

JOSEPH E. HOLLAND Milford, Del. 

(Term will expire 19 15.) 

Rev. LOUIS E. BARRETT, D.D Chestertown, Md. 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

CHARLES B. PRETTYMAN Philadelphia 

(Term will expire 1915.) 

Hon. ROBLEY D. JONES Snow Hill, Md. 

(Term will expire 1914.) 

REPRESENTATIVES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 
PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT 

CHARLES J. HEPBURN, Esq Philadelphia 

1 I ei in will ixpirc 1916.) 

BALTIMORE DISTRICT 

G. LANE TANEYHILL, M.D Baltimore, Md. 

(Term will expin 1915.) 

CARLISLE DISTRICT 

HARRY I. HUBER, Esq Brooklyn, N. Y. 

I ■ mm will expire h>i j.) 

WILMINGTON DISTRICT 

ill \m P. CANNON Bridgeville, Del. 

rerm will expin 



OPPICBRS OF THE hoard 

I Ion. Li>\\ \ki) \\ . Biddi i . President. 
Win [am \\ . I \ ws. Secretai j , 
l< ni\ S. \\[ rsk, Treasurei , 



1 CECUTIVB AND INVESTMENT COMMUTES 

Euci 1 \i 1 1 ■ \( .mi 1 . < hoii man e> <>//'< /<> 
P. Melici 1 i.w \ki. \\ . Biddi i 

I l.w Aid. \l . I'll. 1. 1 1 , .Ik. fOHN S. I^i H 

< 11 mm 1 ■ \\ . Si R \\\ 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



GOVERNMENT AND INSTRUCTION 



Cor. W. Prettyman 
C. Price Speer 
John P. Melick 
Luther B. Wilson 
Harry I. Huber 



Thomas C. Smith 
Wm. A. Stephens 
George B. Wight 
J. Henry Baker 
Geo. D. Chenoweth 
Henry M. Wilson 



Charles W. Straw 
Louis E. Barrett 
Henry P. Cannon 
Robley D. Jones 
G. Lane Taneyhill 



FACULTY 
Luther T. Widerman *William L. Boswell 
Luther B. Wilson Joseph E. Holland 
Charles J. Hepburn William W. Evans 
Edward C. Stokes George B. Wight 
Isaac McCurley 



G. Lane Taneyhill 
Thos. E. Martindale 
Frank B. Lynch 
William L. Woodcock 



Horatio C. King 
James F. Rusling 
*David H. Carroll 
Joseph J. Baughman 
Leslie M. Shaw 
John P. Melick 



FINANCE 
Boyd L. Spahr 
Frank C. Bosler 
William W. Evans 
Chas. B. Prettyman 
Charles K. Zug 
Isaac McCurley 
William D. Boyer 



William L. Woodcock 
John A. Secor 
Edward W. Biddle 
Henry P. Cannon 
J. Henry Baker 
Robley D. Jones 



VACANCIES 
Henry M. Wilson Frank B. Lynch 
William W. Evans Luther T. Widerman 
Thos. E. Martindale Horatio C. King 



William A. Stephens 
William P. Davis 



LIBRARY 
Edward M. Biddle, Jr. Henry P. Cannon 
Frank C. Bosler J. Henry Baker 

James F. Rusling Charles W. Straw 



Henry M. Wilson 
Thomas C. Smith 
Charles J. Hepburn 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
*David H. Carroll Melville Gambrill Franklin F. Bond 
Edward M. Biddle, Jr. John P. Melick Frank C. Bcsler 

William P. Davis Edward W. Biddle George D. Chenoweth 

William D. Boyer 



*Deceased. 



(ID 



FACULTY 



EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., President. 
OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph.D., Dean 

AND PROFESSOR OF GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATI Rl 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph.D. 

THOMAS BEAVER PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 

SUSAN POWERS HOFFMAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

i>l«)i i SSOR OF i-msics 

\\ 1 1 I JAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR Ol PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPH1 NS, Sc.D. 

PROI I SSOR < »i BIOl OG1 

Ml in [N GRAN I FILLER, KM, 

PROI i SSOR <»i LATIN LANGUAG1 \ Nl > I I I I R \ I I ki 

« 0RN1 I II s w II I [AM PR] I I \ MAN, Ph.D. 

PROI l BSOR <>i GERMAN LANG! \<.i tND LITBRATUR1 

MON rGOMl m POR rER SELL! RS, a.m. 

i i OR Ol mil k \- i. i hi BNG1 in i INGI tGl 

I I ON I i SHIN( ■ PRIM l . A.M.. I l B. 

i l HISTORY 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 13 

FACULTY, continued 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph.D; 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A.M. 

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 

LEONARD STOTT BLAKEY, Ph.D. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

HENRY DEXTER LEARNED, A.B. 

INSTRUCTOR IN GERMAN 

LUCRETIA JONES McANNEY, M.O. 

DEAN OF WOMEN AND INSTRUCTOR IN ORATORY 



OVANDO BYRON SUPER, Ph.D. 

SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY AND LIBRARIAN 



JOHN S. BURSK 

TREASURER 



SARA M. BLACK 

SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

government and discipline 

Eugene Allen Noble James Henry Morgan- 

Cornelius W. Prettyman John Frederick Mohler 

Bradford Oliver McIntire Mervin Grant Filler 

GRADUATE WORK 

Bradford Oliver McIntire Leon Cushing Prince 

Montgomery P. Sellers 

library 

Eugene Allen Noble Ovando Byron Super 

James Henry Morgan Leon Cushing Prince 

athletics 

Henry Matthew Stephens William Weidman Landis 

Forrest 1 i gene Cra\ er 



SPECIAL STAFF 1912-13* 

Timothy Cole, Poughkeepsie, IV Y. Wood Engraving. 

Thomas Augustine Daly, Philadelphia. Readings from his own poems. 

1 1 tRRisoN ( >. Elliott, New "> 01 k ( )itj . Bible Study. 

I'ki di ru k W . II iNN w, Brooklj n, N. Y. ( lommencemenl Preacher before 

( ollege < In i 1 1. mi Associat ions. 
1 1 win ton Hoi i . \cu York City, rhe World's Pea< e. 
\\ . A. Houck, Cai lisle. I in< oln al ( letl \ sbui 

l ^ Lott, New ^uk <it\. Employers' Liability and Workmen's 
< ompensation. 

i \i i . \ I. in Park, N. J, College Preachei Week oi 

• I foi < old 
I \i i < ii i Willi tM8, Ne^ York Qty. Foui nalism. 
. Philadelphia. Sen 1 1\ giene 

ublii hi 'I !<• ion 1 1>< dat< i ol otto i add 



N 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 

June, 1912 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. M. L. Beall Rev. Edward Hayes 

Rev. C. L. Mead 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. James B. Stein, D.D. Rev. Joseph H. Price 

Rev. Thomas S. Wilcox, D.D. T. M. Culver 

Rev. Charles T. Dunning, D.D. J. E. Baker 
Rev. Wilford P. Shriner, D.D. T. M. B. Hicks, Esq. 

William L. Woodcock, Esq. 

NEWARK 

Rev. Wallace B. Fleming Rev. Julius F. Maschman 

Rev. Richard I. Watkins 

NEW JERSEY 

Rev. Alfred Wagg Rev. Newton Nelson 

Rev. George E. Archer Rev. C. V. D. Conover 

NEW YORK EAST 
Rev. William E. Scofield Rev. Martin 0. Lepley 

PHILADELPHIA 

Rev. Roland J. Garber Rev. Willis A. Lewis 

Rev. Edward W. Burke Rev. Charles S. Mervine 

Rev. Edward W. Rushton 

WILMINGTON 
Rev. J. W. Colona Rev. J. W. Jones 



(15) 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY 
THE COLLEGE 

May 29, 1912 
I. HONORIS CAUSA 

LL.D- DOCTOR OF LAWS 

George Willets Davison, New York City. 
Theodore Marburg, Baltimore, Md. 
Alexander Simpson, Jr., Philadelphia. 

LITT.D.— DOCTOR OF LETTERS 
J. F. L. Raschen, Easton. 

D.D.— DOCTOR OF DIVINITY 
Rev. Frank MacDaniel (Dickinson, '94), Pennington, N. J. 

A.M. -MASTER OF ARTS 

TiMoim Cole, Poughkeepsie, N. V. 
( 11 aki 1 s M. Levister, Baltimore, Md. 

II. IN CURSU 



A.M MASTER OF ARTS 



GE( >RG1 M< k 1 1 

I >ickinson, '07 
I'ii er, William Grier 

I )ickinson, '<><) 
( 1 \ki. son, John Leed 

l >u I. in on, ' 1 1 

I \< )!'. \l< I \i 

I )m Icinson, ' 1 1 

I DWIl 

I )u kin ..1 

. fOHN Willi \m 

I )k I in- on, '09 
( .11 1 . 1 1 \Ki<-, Walter 
I >i< kin- or 

Bertha S. 

I »i. I in on, ' 1 1 



( rR O . ( ii<i>\ 1 R C 11 \ki 1 S 

I Dickinson, '09 

I I IRRIS, FR1 i>i kk K Uuow N 

I )ickinson, "<"j 
1 . i v t > % 1 ). 
I )ickinson 
.) \( om . Ralph 
I Dickinson, '08 

I I II ( >|)OUI < . 

I >i. l.nr on, '08 
Ketterer, Ge< >r< 1 Hbnr^ 
I )ickinson, '08 

Im; wii K. ( 11 Mil 1 Fredi 

I )u I. in en, '1 1 
I \ 1 11 \M. A 1; I III K .1. 

I >h \ inson, ' 1 



16 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



17 



A.M. -MASTER OF ARTS, continued 



Logan, Henry 

Dickinson, '10 
McCready, Elmer Thomas 

Dickinson, '07 
McKinney, John Hudson 

Allegheny, '09 
Moyer, Frank E. 

Dickinson, '1 1 
Mumper, Hewlings 

Dickinson, 'io 
Peffer, Elmer 

Dickinson, ' 1 1 
Ramsburg, Ira Calvin 

Dickinson, '10 



Shuck, Albert C. 

Dickinson, '11 
Steelman, Frank 

Dickinson, 'io 
Stevens, Jeannette 

Dickinson, '10 
Stevenson, George Bond 

Dickinson, 'io 
Super, John Henry, Jr. 

Dickinson, '09 
Teel, Harold Gilbert 

Dickinson, 'i 1 
Thompson, Howard E. 

Dickinson, '1 1 
Wagg, Alfred Hoppock 
Dickinson, '09 



A.B.— BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Bell, Lewis Wheeler 
Carruthers, Helen Anne 
Deatrick, Anna Marguerite 
Evaul, Harry 
Garber, Florence Helen 
Hemphill, John H. 
Keiser, Mabel M. 
Kelley, Bessie Campbell 
Kitto, Charles White 

Woodward, 



moorhead, g. leroy 
Myers, Lottie Lowe 
Sellers, Ernest Harrison 

SlNGISER, ROMAINE WlLEY 

Smith, Carrie Salome 
Smith, William Moffett 
Strawinski, William E. 
Stuart, Ruth Herman 
Uhland, Eleanor 
Carrie Wile 



Ph.B.— BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Aldridge, Alfred Henderson 
Andrus, Fred L. 
Beaven, Walter Crothers 
Beard, William Martin 
Biddle, David Horner 
Black, William Shearer 
Blanning, Wendell Yeager 
Bramble, Charles Clinton 
Bullock, Russell Edward 
Burns, Sarah Helen 
Dick, Walter B. 
Dorcus, Edwin Stanley 
Drumm, Kathryn Sheirich 
Einstein, Robert Stuart 



Fry, Clarence Amos 
Glauser, Willis Klink 
Hall, John A. F. 
Handwork, Edna M. L. 
Hays, William Linn 
Heller, Ruth 

Henderson, David Albert, Jr. 
Hertzler, Russell Clarence 
Hosie, Donald McLean 
Humphrey, Walter Francis 
Jenkins, Mary Ruth 
Leidig, Jacob B. 
Losey, Raymond Wildrick 
Martin, John Freed 



18 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Ph. B— BACHELOR OF 

Martin, Thompson Starr 
Miller, S. Carroll 
Mumper, Norris McAllister 
Perry, Francis E. 
Rahn, Earl Eugene 
Renn, Paul Richter 
Rider, Edna Elisabeth 
Roberts, Mary Elma 
Rowland, George H. G. 
Sadler, Gilbert Hastings 
Shields, Richard Allen 
Shilling, Robert Edward 



PHILOSOPHY, continued 

Sohn, Walter Robison 
Spahr, Murray Hurst, Jr. 
Speece, Newton Withington 
Stauffer, Simon Walter 
Steckel, Harvey Harbaugh 
Stein, Norman Lester 
Strite, Edwin Durboraw 
Todd, Glenn Edward 
VanAuken, Charles S. 
VanHook, Carlton R. 
Yahn, Charles Arnold 
Zang, Melinda Anna 



SC.B.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Felton, John Lincoln 



LL.B.- BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Badger, Frederick Preston 



Challis, Robert Reese 
Dickson, Clark Long 
Edwards, Alison Lee 
Fritz, Harold W. 
Landis, James Blaim 
Long, Florence E. 
M< Kinney, John 1 [udson 
Watkins, 



Marianelli, Emilio 



Marshall, George Bishop 

PlJDERBAUGH, ROBERT JaMI S 

Rooke, James J, 
Stafford, Elbert Wesley 
Stevenson, George Bond 
Underwood, Charles Vincent 
\Y tRRiNGTON, Jambs Ons 
Norman Conrad 



COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Class 1912 
!(>i' EXCELLENCE IN SCHOLARSHIP 

William M. Bi \ki>. \\ illiamspoi t. Md. 
i H. Sellers, Carlisle 

\\ . M i Smii m. Jamcsburg, N. J. 

( ii mm i S. Va \i i .i . BJ iii town, N. .1. 



FOR EXCELLENCE in ESSAY and ORATORICAL WORK 
JUNIOR and SENIOR YEARS 

\i i i i i. ll \\ DRiDGi . Fayet te> illc. 
' n \ki i w.Kmki, Pen \ir\ I. 
William E. Straw inski, I lum ingdon. 



Courses of Study 

The college offers four parallel courses of study, each covering 
four years: The Classical, the Latin-Scientific, the Scientific, and 
the Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are largely 
required; but, in the last two years, the work is mostly elective as 
shown under Ordei of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per week, 
are required in the Freshman year, and are elective, three hours each 
per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Classical 
course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by additional studies 
in modern languages and science. 

Scientific Course. — Latin and Greek are not required, though 
they may be offered for admission, a large amount of time being given 
to studies in science, mathematics, and modern languages. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Law Electives.— Three hours per week of law may be elected in 
the Junior, and five hours per week in the Senior year. By judicious 
election and a little extra work, students may save one year in their 
subsequent course in the School of Law. An extra charge is made 
when law is elected in place of college work. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in May 
and must have the approval of class deans. Change in electives may 
be made for good reason with the consent of class deans during the first 
three days of the college year, but later changes can be made only with 
consent of the Faculty. 

Extra Elective Studies. — Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of the Fac- 
ulty, such additional work will not interfere with their regular work. 

Special Students. — Students with uneven preparation may be 
admitted to the college upon showing, by examination or otherwise, 
that they are prepared for college work; but no such students will be 
admitted unless fully prepared in English, history, and one other 
subject of college preparation, nor with less than eleven units of 
college preparatory work, a unit of such work being a year's study of 
some preparatory subject, not less than 'four periods per week. 

Graduate Work. — Graduate work is provided only for graduates 
of the college who are candidates for the Master's Degree. For further 
information, see Degrees. 

(19) 



Admission 



Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In all 
cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, and, if 
from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college will 
not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for work done in approved secondary schools are 
accepted, and students are admitted to the college on certification 
that the requirements for admission have been fully met; but cert id- 
eates covering less than the full requirements may or may not be 
accepted, depending upon the amount of the shortage and the condi- 
tions under which the work was done. However, students In arrears 
in preparation one full year's work in English, or more than one year's 
work in any other study, will be examined on all the work offered in 
the subject or subjects in which there is this deficiency. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation from schools or seminaries 
will not be accepted, but blank forms of certificates for work done will 
be furnished by the college on application, and it is required that these 

certificates be sent to the college direct from the principal o( the pre- 
paratory school. 

Certificate! foi advanced standing in the college maj or ma> not 
b< accepted, depending upon the institution in which the ad> a met I work 
has been done, and the branches of college work lor which the certifi- 
cate is "H' oil. Iii other wools, candidates foi such advanced standing 
how thai thej .lie capable <■! doing the work ol the advanced 
loi which thc\ applj . 

ON EXAMINATION 

foi ad mis: ion are ln-M on I uesdaj <>t commencement 
. and on i he daj before t he op< ning ol t hi fall tei m. 
Foi advanced standing students w ill be < xamined in the prepar 
v Mil. foi entrance to college and in the studies previously pursued by 
I h< \ pro] 



•o 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is 
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division 
into paragraphs. 

i. Reading and Practice. — A certain number of books will be 
recommended for reading, ten of which, selected as prescribed below, 
are to be. offered for examination, The form of examination will usually 
be the writing of a paragraph or two on each of several topifcs, to be 
chosen by the candidate from a considerable number — perhaps ten or 
fifteen — set before him in the examination paper. The treatment of 
these topics is designed to test the candidate's power of clear and accu- 
rate expression, and will call only for a general knowledge of the 
substance of the books. In every case knowledge of the book will be 
regarded as less important than the ability to write good English. In 
place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present 
an exercise book, properly certified to by his instructor, containing 
compositions or other written work done in connection with the reading 
of the books. In preparation for this part of the requirement, it is 
important that the candidate shall have been instructed in the funda- 
mental principles of rhetoric. 

For the years IQ13-15. 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books provided for read- 
ing are arranged in the following groups, from which at least ten units 
are to be selected, two from each group: 

Group I. The Old Testament, comprising at least the chief narra- 
tive episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and 
Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and Esther; the Odyssey, with 
the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII; 
the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, 
XVII, XXI; Vergil's ^Eneid. The Odyssey, Iliad, and ^Eneid should 
be read in English translations of recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted. 

Group II. Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," "Midsummer 
Night's Dream," "As You Like It," "Twelfth Night," "King Henry 
the Fifth," "Julius Caesar." 

Group III. Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe," Part I; Goldsmith's 
"Vicar of Wakefield;" either Scott's "Ivanhoe" or "Quentin Durward;" 
Hawthorne's "House of the Seven Gables;" either Dickens' "David 
CopperfieId"or"ATaIe of Two Cities;" Thackeray's "Henry Esmond;" 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Mrs. Gaskell's "Cranford;" George Eliot's "Silas Marner;" Steven- 
son's "Treasure Island." 

Group IV, Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," Part I; the "Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers" in the Spectator; Franklin's Autobiography (con- 
densed); Irving's "Sketch Book;" Macaulay's Essays on Lord Clive 
and Warren Hastings; Thackeray's "English Humorists;" Selections 
from Lincoln, including at least the two Inaugurals, the Speeches in 
Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and 
Letter to Horace Greeley, along with a brief memoir or estimate; 
Parkman's "Oregon Trail;" either Thoreau's "Walden," or Huxley's 
Autobiography and selections from Lay Sermons, including the 
addresses on "Improving Natural Knowledge." "A Liberal Education," 
and "A Piece of Chalk;" Stevenson's "Inland Voyage" and "Travels 
with a Donkey." 

Group V. Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Books II 
and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and 
Burns; Gray's "Elegy in a Country Churchyard" and Goldsmith's 
"Deserted Village;" Coleridge's "Ancient Mariner" and Lowell's 
"Vision of Sir Launfal;" Scott's "Lady of the Lake;" Byron's "Childe 
Harold," Canto IV, and "The Prisoner of Chillon;" Palgrave's "Gol- 
den Treasury" (First Series), Book IV, with especial attention to 
Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; Poe's "The Raven;" Longfellow's 
"The Courtship of Miles Standish" and Whittier's "Snow Bound;" 
Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient Rome" and Arnold's "Sohrab and 
Rustum;" Tennyson's "Gareth and Lynette," "Lancelot and Elaine," 
and "The Passing of Arthur;" Browning's "Cavalier Tunes," "The 

Lost Leader," "I low they Brought the Good News lroni Ghent to 

Ai.\," "I lomc Thoughts from Abroad," "Home Thoughts from the 
Sea," "Incident of the French Camp," "Herv£ Riel," "Pheidippides," 
"\K Lasl Duchess," "Up at a Villa Down in the City." 

II. Stud> and Practice. This part of the examination presup- 
poses the thorough study of each of the works named below. I he 
examination will be upon Bubject-matter, form, and structure. In 
addition, the candidate maj be required toanswei questions involving 

i nti.ils ol English grammar, and questions on the leadinj 
in thos< periods <>l English literarj history to which the prescribed 
woi I • belo 

Foi iln years [91 >, 1 ■; the books se1 foi t his part <>i the examination 
will be as follows: 

Shal "Macbeth;" Milton's "Comus," "L'AlIegro," "II 

Penseroso;" Burke's Speecl < onciliation with America, <>i Wash- 

i 1 re well Address and Webster's First Bunkei Mill Oration; 
Macaulay'i "I if( ol fohnson," <>i < arlylc's Essaj on Burns. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 23 

Greek. — Grammar; Xenophon's "Anabasis," four books; Homer's 
"Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day to day 
in preparation is recommended, and ability to write simple Greek sen- 
tences is required. 

History. — Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States. The 
following works will indicate the amount required: Oman's "History of 
Greece," Leighton's "History of Rome" (to the close of the reign of 
Augustus), or Smith's "Smaller History of Rome," McLaughlin's 
"History of the United States for Schools." 

Latin. — I. The Latin reading required of candidates for admission 
to college, without regard to the prescription of particular authors and 
works, shall be not less in amount than Caesar, "Gallic War," I-IV; 
Cicero, "The Orations against Catiline," "For the Manilian Law," and 
"For Archias;" Vergil, "^neid," I-VI. 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by the 
schools from the following authors and works: Caesar, "Gallic War" 
and "Civil War;" Nepos, "Lives;" Cicero, "Orations" and "De Senec- 
tute;" Sallust, "Catiline" and "Jugurthine War;" Vergil, "Bucolics," 
"Georgics," and 'VEneid;" and Ovid, "Metamorphoses," "Fasti," 
and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recommended by 
the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; Algebra 
through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, including the solu- 
tion of one hundred or more original exercises. 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

(a) English, History, Latin, and Mathematics, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

(6) French or German. Three years' work, recitations daily, in 
either French or German or two years' work in French or German and 
one year's work in either Botany, Chemistry, Physics, or Physical 
Geography. 

The preparation in French should comprise careful drill in the 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and the 
common irregular verbs, the inflection of adjectives and the use of the 
participles and pronouns, constant attention being paid to pronuncia- 
tion. Much time should be given to translations, both oral and written, 
of easy English into French. From six hundred to eight hundred pages 
of graduated texts should be read. Where much attention has been 
given to oral work, the amount of reading may be diminished 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Students offering German as an entrance requirement should be 
thoroughly familiar with the essentials of German Grammar; should 
be able to translate easy English into German; should be able to trans- 
late at sight easy German prose, and should be able to pronounce with 
a fair degree of accuracy. From four hundred to eight hundred pages 
of graduated texts should have been read. 

SCIENTIFIC OR PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

1. The requirements for the Latin-Scientific course; or, 

2. (a) Mathematics, English, and History, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

(6) Latin or Greek. Four books of Caesar, or equivalent of Greek. 

(c) French or German. Three years' work in French or German, or 
two years' work in French or German and either one year's work in 
History or Latin or the Mathematics of the Freshman year. 

(d) Science. — Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany. 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 

3. (a) English and History, the same as for the Classical course. 

(b) Mathematics. — The entrance requirements for the Classical 
course and the Mathematics of the Freshman year. 

(c) French and German. — Two years' work in both French and 
German. The work required in each language is full) described under 
admission to I at in-Scientilic course. 

(d) Science. Two years' work in the following subjects: Botany, 
Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses of Instruction are given in some detail under Ordei of 
Studies on the following pages, so that each separate course given may 
n al once in connection with other courses in the same subject. 
which nia\ have preceded or which are to follow; also in connection 
with courses In other subjects, which may be taken in connection with 
it. In this wa} the possibilities N>i election or choice ol work to be 
taken are broi ther in small compass foi easj comparison. 






Order of Studies 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



CLASSICAL COURSE 

English.— English Composition in Theory and Practice (Canby and 
others). (Four hours per week.) 

Greek. — Selections from Thucydides, Herodotus, and Lysias. Prose 
Composition. Sight Reading. (Four hours per week.) 

History. — Political and Constitutional History of England. (Two hours 
per week.) 

Latin. — Selections from Sallust and Livy, Cicero, De Senectute or 
De Amicitia. Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed, and emphasis 
laid upon the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is given 
to translation in the classroom and to the writing of easy Latin 
Prose. Roman History is reviewed. The course is largely devoted 
to drill-work, and aims to prepare the student for the intelligent 
and sympathetic reading of Latin literature in subsequent courses. 
(Four hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Oratory. — (One hour per week.) 



LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

English. — English Composition in Theory and Practice (Canby and 
others). (Four hours per week.) 

French or German. — One of the following: 

French: Quatre-vingt-treize. Dosia. Picciola. Pecheur d' Islande. Le 
Roi des Montagnes. (Four hours per week.) 

German: Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). (Four hours 
per week.) 

History. — Political and Constitutional History oj England. (Two 
hours per week.) 

(25) 



26 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Latin. — Selections from Sallust and Livy, Cicero, De Senectute or 
De Amicitia. Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed, and emphasis 
laid upon the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is 
given to translation in the classroom and to the writing of easy 
Latin Prose. Roman History is reviewed. The course is largely 
devoted to drill-work, and aims to prepare the student for the 
intelligent and sympathetic reading of Latin literature in subse- 
quent courses. (Four hours per week.) 

Mathematics.— Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Oratory. — (One hour per week.) 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

English.- — English Composition in Theory and Practice (Canhv and 
others). (Four hours per week.) 

French. — Advanced or Beginning, one of the following: 

Advanced French: Quatre-vingt-treize. Dosia. Picciola. Pecbeur 

d' Islande. Le Roi des Monlagnes. (Four hours per week.) 
Beginning French:* Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy lead- 
ings. (Three hours per week.) 

German. — Advanced or Beginning, one of the following: 

Advanced German: Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft). 

(Four hours per week.) 
Beginning German:* Spanhoofd's Lebrbuch der Deutschcn Spracbe, 

(Three hours per week.) 

History.- Political and Constitutional History of England* (Two hours 

per week.) 

Mathematics. Solid Geometry (Durell). Alegbra (Wentworth), 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Foui hours per week.) 

()i<<\ ioia . (Oik hour per week. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
English.- English Composition in Theory and Practice (Canb} and 

I ii ■< ii. Advanced <>i Beginning, on< "I tin followii 
Advanced French: Quatre-vingt-tre\ <. Dosia. Picciola, Pecbeut 
d' Islande. /< Rot des \l<>niurn<\. (Foui hours pei week.) 

nnini French Gramma\ (Aldrich and Foster). Easj Read- 
ing! . I Im houi i" i m < I . Or, 

ni nine it foi mi l> Ml i mi ond | 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 27 

German. — Advanced or Beginning, one of the following: 

Advanced German: Readings. Prose Composition (Wesselhoeft), 

(Four hours per week.) 
Beginning German:* Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der Deutschen Spracbe, 
(Three hours per week.) 
History. — Political and Constitutional History of England. (Two hours 

per week.) 
Mathematics. — Solid Geometry (Durell). Algebra (Wentworth). 
Plane Trigonometry (Crockett). (Four hours per week.) 

Oratory. — (One hour per week.) 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

CLASSICAL COURSE 
Required Studies: 

Biology. — General Biology. Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per 
week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 
Half the year. 

Economics. — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week.) 

English Literature. — English Literature (Brooke and Carpenter; 
Newcomer and Andrews), with lectures and class and private 
reading. (Three hours per week.) 

Psychology. — (Two hours per week for a half year.) 
Elective Studies (nine hours to be elected) : 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures and lecture experiments. (Two 
hours per week*) Laboratory course. (One period of two hours 
per week.) 

German. — Beginning German:* Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der Deutschen 
Sprache. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek. — Lucian, Dialogues; Plato, Apology; Sophocles, (Edipus Rex. 

Latin. — An outline study of the History of Latin Literature, with illus- 
trative readings from the more important writers. In the first 
half year Classical Mythology is reviewed, with particular reference 
to its use in later literature and art; in the second half-year the 
Manners and Customs of the Romans are considered. (Three hours 
per week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Hulburt). (Three hours per week.) 

^Students beginning German must continue it for at least a second year. 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies: 

Biology. — General Biology. Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per 
week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 
Half the year. 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures and lecture experiments. 
(Two hours per week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two 
hours per week.) 

Economics. — Elements oj Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Brooke 
and Carpenter; Newcomer and Andrews), with lectures and class 
and private reading. (Three hours per week.) 

Psychology. — (Two hours per week for half the year). 

Elective Studies (six hours, to be elected) : 

French. — Advanced French: Scenes de la Revolution francaise. 
Hernani. La Fontaine's Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversa- 
tion and Composition. (Three hours per week.) Grammar (Aldrich 
and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three hours per week.) Or, 
Beginning French:* Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Read- 
ings. (Three hours per week.) 

German. Beginning German:* Spanhoofd's Lebrbucb der Deutscben 
Spracbe. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Schiller's Dramas and I ongei Poems. (Three hours pej week.) 

I a i in. An out line st ud\ of the History oj Latin Literature, \\ ith illus- 
trative readings from the more important writers. In the Brsl 
hall-\ ear ( lassu al W\ tbolog] is re\ iewed, \\\\\\ particulai reference 
to its use in [atei literature and art; in the second half-year the 
\4anners and ( ustoms oj tbe Romans arc considered. I I hue hours 
i ><t w eek.) 

Mathematics, {nalytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
I I lulbui t). 'I hree hours pei weel 

I ' i. ll fbl it I. 1|1 | ... ..nil \ i ll . 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

Required Studies: 

Biology. — General Biology. Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per 
week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 
Half the year. 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures and lecture experiments. 
(Two hours per week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two 
hours per week.) 

Economics. — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles oj Economics. (Three hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Brooke 
and Carpenter; Newcomer and Andrews), with lectures and 
class and private reading. (Three hours per week.) 

French or German. — One of the following: 

French: Quatre-vingt-treize. Dosia. Picciola. Pecheur a 1 ' Islande, 

he Roi des Montagnes. (Four hours per week.) 
German: Deutches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon), 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) 
Psychology. — (Two hours per week for a half year.) 

Elective Studies (three hours, to be elected) : 

French.— Scenes de la Revolution francaise. Hernani. La Fontaine's 
Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 
(Three hours per week.) 

German. — Schiller's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours per 
week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Hulburt). (Three hours per week.) 

Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Biology. — General Biology. Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per 
week.) Laboratory course. ,.(One period of two hours per week.) 
Half the year. 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures and lecture experiments. 
(Two hours per week.) Laboratory course. (One period of two 
hours per week.) 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Economics.- — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Introduction to English Literature (Brooke 
and Carpenter; Newcomer and Andrews), with lectures and class 
and private reading. (Three hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry (Fine and Thompson). Calculus 
(Hulburt). (Three hours per week.) 

Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

Psychology. — (Two hours per week for half the year.) 



JUNIOR CLASS 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

(Sixteen hours, to be elected.) 

Botany.- — Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per week.) .Laboratory 
course. (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Chemistry. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 
Laboratory course. (One period of two hours per week.) Or, 

Advanced: Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 
Laboratory course in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods of two 
hours per week.) 

Economics. Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week, 
1912 1 j only.) 

Economk I )i \ 1 1 oi'Mi \ 1 >lnd Industriai History. 

Modem Industrial History oj Europe. Lectures supplemented 
l>\ prescribed t<>i>u:il readings. (Three hours per week, first half- 

Economu Development oj the I mud States. Lectures sup- 
plem< nted l>\ prescribed topical readings. I I luce hours per week, 
■ md half-} 1 

1 < .1 1 11 I'i i'. 1 1 . ' 1 1 Kt-book) with lectures. I I wo hours pei w< 

English Literature. Ltterarj Crtftctsm (Winchester; Cunliffc), 
1 ■ hours pei week. > 

I niK . I In* c hours pei we< k, ->< < ond half-year.) 

I Ml. if .1 in fcltl n.il' II. 1. .1 IQI J II 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

French.* — Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week.) 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek. — Greek Drama. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek Testament.** — Selected Books from the New Testament. 
(Two hours per w r eek.) 

History. — A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week.) 
Civilization in Europe. (Two hours per week.) 

Latin. — Course I. A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 
from Catullus, Horace, and others. First half-year. The Latin 
Drama, with a brief study of its development. Several comedies 
of Plautus and Terence, and one tragedy of Seneca will be read. 
Second half year. (Three hours per week.) 

Course II. — A Study of the Silver Age, with readings from 
Seneca and Tacitus, Martial and Juvenal. Further study of the 
History of Latin Literature. (Three hours per week.) 

Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Projective Geometry (Cremona). (Three hours per 
week.) 

Physics.! — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year.) 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies: 

Physics. — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (One period of two hours per week.) 

Elective Studies (thirteen hours to be elected) : 

Botany. — Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (Two periods per week.) 

Chemistry.— A dvanced. Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per 
week.) Laboratory course in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods 
of two hours per week.) 

^Students beginning French must continue it at least a second year. 
**Offered in alternate years — not offered 1912-13. 

fUnless Chemistry was taken in the Sophomore year, this course in Physics, or the 
Sophomore Chemistry, must be taken in the Junior year. 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Economics. — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week, 
19 1 2-1 3 only.) 

Economic Development and Industrial History. — 

Modern Industrial History oj Europe. Lectures supplemented 
by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, first half- 
year.) 

Economic Development oj the United States. Lectures sup- 
plemented by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, 
second half year.) 

English Bible.* — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; CunlifFe). 
(Two hours per week.) 

Ethics. — (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 

French. — Scenes de la Revolution jrancaise. Hernani. La Fontaine's 
Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 
(Three hours per week.) 

German.- — Deutsches Rejormlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 
German Daily Lije. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Open only to 
students who have had at least three years of German. 

History. A Study of Epochs, American History. (Three hours per 

week. I 

Civilization in Europe, (Two hours per week, 

Latin. ( m^ I. A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 

from Catullus, Horace, and others. Inst half-year. The latm 
Drama, with a brief stud} of its development. Several comedies 
of Plautus and Terence and one tragedy <>i Seneca will lie read, 
Second half-year. (Three hours pei week.) 

( ourse II. \ Stud} <>l tin Silvei Age, with readings from 
Seneca and Tacitus, Martial and Juvenal. Further study oi the 
Histor} of Latin Literature. (Three hours pei w< 

I . ( riminal I aw, 1 I hree hours per week.) 

1 em ati 1 . /'/<-/( 1 /// ( Ceometr] (Cremona.) (Three In mis per 

■ l.. 1 

P vchology. (Three hours pei w< ek, firsl hall 

rd in nil I • < ■ • 1 1 < i ■ i I i ■ > \ | i i 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies: 
Botany. — Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Chemistry.— A dvanced. Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per 
week.) Laboratory course in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods 
of two hours per week.) 

Physics. — Advanced. (Three hours per week.) Laboratory course. 
(One period of two hours per week.) 

Elective Studies (five hours to be elected) : 
Economics. — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles of Economics. (Three hours per week, 
191 2-13 only.) 

Economic Development and Industrial History. — 

Modern Industrial History of Europe. Lectures, supplemented 
by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, first half 
year.) 

Economic Developme?it of the United States. Lectures, supple- 
mented by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, 
second half year.) 

English Bible.* — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 
(Two hours per week.) 

Ethics. — {Three hours per week, econd half-year.) 

French. — Scenes de la Revolution francaise. Hernani. La Fontaine's 
Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 
(Three hours per week.) 

German. — Deutsches Reformlesebuch (Savory). Im Vaterland (Bacon). 
German Daily Life. (Three hours per week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Open only to 
students who have had at least three years of German. 

History. — A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week.) 
Civilization in Europe. (Two hours per week.) 

Law. — Criminal Law. (Three hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Projective Geometry (Cremona). (Three hours per 
week.) 

Psychology. — (Three hours per week, first half-year.) 

^Offered in alternate years — not offered 1912-13. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

(Sixteen hours, to be elected.) 
Botany. — Text-book, with lectures. (One hour per week.) Labora- 
tory course. (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Chemistry. — Advanced. Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per 
week.) Laboratory course in Analytical Chemistry. (Two periods 
of two hours per week.) 

Economics.- — Elements of Economics. Text-book, with assigned read- 
ings. Taussig's Principles oj Economics. (Three hours per week, 
1912-13 only.) 

Economic Development and Industrial History. — 

Modern Industrial History of Europe. Lectures supplemented 
by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, first half- 
year.) 

Economic Development of the United States. Lectures, supple- 
mented by prescribed topical readings. (Three hours per week, 
second half-year.) 

Enclish Bible.* — Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours per week.) 

English Literature. — Literary Criticism (Winchester; Cunliffe). 

(Two hours per week.) 
Ethics.— (Three hours per week, second half-year.) 

French.- Scenes de la Revolution francaise. Hernani. La Fontaine's 
Fables, Cj rano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 

(Three hours per week.) 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 

hours per week.) 

German. Deutscbes Reformlesebucb (Savory). Im Vat erland (Bacon), 
German Daily I ife. (Three hours per week.) 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Open onl\ to 
students who have had a1 least three years "l German. 

History. A Study of Epochs. American History. (Three hours per 
week.) 

( ivilization in Europe, (1 wo hours per week.) 

I \w. Criminal Law, (Three hours pei week.) 

Mathematics. Projectivi Geometry (( remona). (Three hours pei 
weel 

Text-book, with lectures. (Two hours pei week.) I abora- 
toi \ course. (One period ol two hours pei week.) 

I in. 1 hours pei wi ek, firsl hall j 

ctcd in 1 Ik Sophomore j 1 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 



SENIOR CLASS 

CLASSICAL, LATIN-SCIENTIFIC, OR 
PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

(Sixteen hours to be elected from the following, not before taken, 
and for which the student is prepared.) 

American Literature. — Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast, revised); The Chief American Poets (Page); with lectures and 
class and private readings. (One hour per week.) 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week.) 

Chemistry.— Advanced, (a) (Two or four hours per week.) Labo- 
ratory course in Quantitative Analysis. 

(b) Organic Chemistry. Text-book, with lectures. (Two 
hours per week.) Laboratory course. (Two periods of two hours 
per week.) 

Economics and Sociology. — 

Industrial Organization and Business Management. Lectures, 
assigned readings, and recitations (to follow Junior elective course). 
(Three hours per week.) 

Principles of Sociology (Giddings). Text-book, supplemented 
by lectures and reports. (Three hours per week.) 

Social and Economic Problems. Lectures, assigned topics, and 
reports. Open to students who have completed Principles of 
Sociology. (Three hours per week.) 

Education. — Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week.) 

Electricity. — Electricity and Magnetism (Franklin and McNutt). 
(Three hpurs per week, for one term.) Laboratory course. (Two 
hours per week, throughout the year.) 

English Drama. — Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 
week.) 

French. — Scenes de la Revolution francaise. Hernaiii. La Fontaine's 
Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 
(Three hours per week.) 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week.) 

Geology. — (Two hours per week.) 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

German. — Goethe's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours per 
week.) 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Open only to stu- 
dents who have had at least three years of German. 

Greek. — Greek Drama. (Three hours per week.) 

Greek Testament.* — Selected Books from the New Testament. 
(Two hours per week.) 

History.— Spain and the Spanish-American Colonies. (Two hours 
per week. 1912-13*.) 

Europe Since the Congress of Vienna. (Two hours per week. 
1913-14*). 

International Law. — International Law. Text-book and lectures, 
with the study of cases. (Two hours per week.) 

Latin. — Course I. A Study of Latin Lyrics, with lectures and readings 
from Catullus, Horace, and others. First half-year. 

The Latin Drama, with a brief study of its development. 
Several comedies of Plautus and Terence and one tragedy of 
Seneca will be read. Second half-year. (Three hours per week.) 
Course II. A Study of the Silver Age, with readings from 
Seneca and Tacitus, Martial, and Juvenal. Further study o( the 
History of Latin Literature. (Three hours per week.) 

I .aw . ( Fh c hours per week.) 

Mathematics. Projective Geometry (Cremona). (Time hours per 

week.) 

Phii osophi . (Three hours per week. ) 

Physics. Advanced course. (Three hours per week for two terms.' 
Laboratory course: Physical experiments ami measurements in 

heat, light, and chvtinil\. I Mi< >! 1 >;• ,1 a phlC pKutuv. (Our period 
ol t WO hours pci Week. I 

Z00LO1 i' t-book and lectures. (One hour per week.) Laboratory 

work. (( )u pei iod 1 >ei week. 

■ ■ . .1 1 11 ..It. 1 11 1I1 Vi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Required Studies: 
Chemistry. — (Two hours per week.) One of the following: 

Advanced, (a) (Two or four hours per week.) Laboratory 
course in Quantitative Analysis. 

(6) Organic Chemistry. Text-book, with lectures. (Two 
hours per week.) Laboratory course. (Two periods of two hours 
per week.) 

Astronomy or Geology. — (Two hours per week.) 

Physical Laboratory. — (Two periods of two hours per week.) 

Zoology. — Text-book and lectures. (One hour per week.) Laboratory 
work. (One period per week.) 

Elective Studies (eight hours, to be elected) : 

American Literature. — Introduction to American Literature (Pan- 
coast); The Chief American Poets (Page); with lectures and class 
and private readings. (One hour per week.) 

Astronomy. — (Two hours per week.) 

Chemistry. — Advanced. (Two or four hours per week.) 

Christian Evidences. — (Two hours per week, last fourth of the year.) 

Economics and Sociology. — 

Industrial Organization and Business Management. Lectures, 
assigned readings, and recitations. (To follow Junior elective 
course.) (Three hours per week.) 

Principles of Sociology (Giddings). Text-book, supplemented 
by lectures and reports. (Three hours per week.) 

Social and Economic Problems. Lectures, assigned topics, and 
reports. Open to students who have completed Principles of 
Sociology. (Three hours per week.) 

Education. — Processes of Instruction. History of Education. Educa- 
tional Theory. (Three hours per week.) 

Electricity. — Laboratory. (Two hours per week.) 

English Drama. — Lectures, Readings, and Essays. (Two hours per 

week.) 

French. — Scenes de la Revolution francaise. Hernani. La Fontaine's 
Fables. Cyrano de Bergerac. Conversation and Composition. 
(Three hours per week.) Or, 

Grammar (Aldrich and Foster). Easy Readings. (Three 
hours per week.) 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Geology. — (Two hours per week.) 

German. — Goethe's Dramas and Longer Poems. (Three hours per 
week.) Or, 

Goethe's Faust. (Three hours per week.) Open only to stu- 
dents who have had at least three years of German. 

History. — Spain and the Spanish-American Colonies. (Two hours 
per week, 191 2-1 3.*) 

Europe Since the Coiigress of Vienna. (Two hours per week, 
1913-14.*) 

International Law. — International Law. Text-book and lectures, 
with the study of cases. (Two hours per week.) 

Law. — (Five hours per week.) 

Mathematics. — Projective Geometry (Cremona). (Three hours per 
week.) 

Philosophy. — (Three hours per week.) 

*Given in alternate years. 



Material Equipment 

Grounds and Buildings. — The campus includes a full square of the 
borough of Carlisle, purchased of the Penns by the Corporation. Upon 
it are grouped most of the buildings of the college proper. In addi- 
tion, the college owns the Law School building, Conway Hall, Denny 
Hall, South College, and Lloyd Hall; also a fine and well-equipped 
athletic field. The buildings are heated from a central steam plant 
and lighted by electricity. 

West College (1804), built of native limestone and trimmed with 
red sandstone, is 150 by 54 feet, and contains commodious accom- 
modations for the Young Men's Christian Association, and dormitories 
for sixty-five students. 

East College (1836), also of native limestone, 130 by 42 feet and 
four stories high, is used solely for dormitory purposes, and will accom- 
modate one hundred and ten students. 

The Jacob Tome Scientific Building (1884), the gift of the late 
Jacob Tome, of Port Deposit, Md., is of native limestone trimmed with 
Ohio sandstone and is 184 feet long by §6 feet wide. The west wing 
contains complete provisions for a college department of physics, 
including lecture-room, office of professor, private laboratory, large 
laboratory for general use, three small laboratories, a workshop, and 
minor apparatus rooms. The east wing contains similar ample pro- 
vision for the chemical department, and the center is occupied by a 
large and handsome museum hall adapted to the preservation and 
display of the collections of the college. 

The James W. Bosler Memorial Library Hall (1885) is an admi- 
rable structure in architectural design, as well as in material and con- 
struction. It was the gift to the college by the widow of him whose 
name it bears, and in whose honor it was conceived and built, the cost 
of the furnished building being about $75,000.00. It supplies library 
accommodations, substantially fire-proof, and an audience hall seat- 
ing eight hundred persons. In this building the valuable library has 
not only complete protection, but also the requisites for convenient 
use and proper display, with room for growth. 

The Denny Memorial Building, occupying the site of the first 
Denny Building destroyed March 3, 1904, was completed and dedi- 
cated June 6, 1905. The first story is of Hummelstown brownstone 
with the second and third stories of dark, iron-clay, pressed brick. 
The building is distinctively memorial in character. In it are eleven 
large recitaticn-rooms, each with an office adjoining, and, in addition, 

(39) 



40 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

three large halls, for the use of the literary societies of the college, 
two of which date back more than one hundred years. The various 
rooms are designated as follows: KessIer-McFadden Hall, Smith 
Hall, Carroll Hall, Stephen Greene Hall, Harman Hall, Reed Hall, 
Patton Hall, Lindner Hall, Durbin Hall, Lawton Hall, Trickett Hall, 
Hoyt-Haight Hall, Prettyman Hall, McCrea-Earp Hall, Crider Hall, 
Crawford Hall, and Pierce Hall, each with an appropriate inscription 
tablet recording the name of the person in whose honor the Hall is 
named, together with that of the one establishing the memorial. 
The building contains also the lecture-room, laboratories, and collec- 
tions of the biological department of the college. The laboratories are 
large, well lighted, and thoroughly equipped with apparatus for the 
work of the department. 

The Gymnasium furnishes accommodation for physical training. 
The main hall, 75 feet in length by 40 feet in width, is Hanked on the 
eastern and western extremities by wings, of which the one, in dimen- 
sions 84 by 20 feet, contains the baseball cage, while the other, 60 by 
20 feet, is used for offices, bathing- and dressing-rooms. It is pro\ ided 
with a running gallery, having a track of 235 feet in length, bathrooms, 
dressing-rooms, and offices, completely fitted up and furnished with 
proper appliances. 

Lloyd Hall is used for the accommodation of the the young women 
attending the college. The building, of brick, with large grounds 
adjoining, is comfortably furnished, and constitutes a beautiful and 

Commodious home lor ladies who are non-residents of the town. 

South College, on a lot 250 by 240 feet, is used for dormitory pur- 
poses, save the Inst floor, which is reserved for recitation-rooms, offices, 

and t he ( College ( .ominous. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Athletic Field was the 
j^ilt of the Hon. and Mis. Edward W. Biddle, oi Carlisle, In memory "i 
theii lamented son, I ferman Bosler Biddle, class <>l [903, and Is ;i trad 
ol land ol more than si\ acres, located on the Chambersburg turnpike 
1 Main streel extension), easily accessible from the college, and admira- 
dapted to the purposes for which it has Keen prepared. The 
in Id is entered .it the northeastern cornei through an artistically 
iteway. On tin western side is a splendid grand-stand, which 
•ill accommodate nine hundred and iiit\ spectators. In from of the 
grand-stand Btretchea tin straightaway ti.uk. •" feel in width, form- 
ed "ii ol tin quarter-mile track, everj pan «>i which Is in lull 
ml. Withm the ellipse formed l>\ the track is located 
tin diamond and gridiron required foi baseball and football. On tin 
nl- .in h\i model tennis-courts. The imld was dedicated 
with imprcssh nonies, Jun< 8, 1909, and is one of the most beau- 
tiful .'it hli t i( lit Id', in t In ( mint 1 \ . 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

The College Commons, in South College, is a boarding depart- 
ment conducted by college students themselves, where good board is 
secured at cost. 

Todd Hospital, the gift of Mrs. Sarah A. Todd, is located in 
Carlisle, and is available for the use of students at any time. 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

The Library, available to all students, under established regula- 
tions, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — that of 
the college proper, which is exceedingly rich in old volumes and in 
reference books in certain departments — and those of the Belles Lettres 
and Union Philosophical Societies, accumulated by them during the 
century and more of their existence. These three libraries are one in 
organization, not only by reason of their arrangement, but by the 
registration of the books of all in a single catalogue, on the card plan, 
which renders books in any of the collections easy of reference. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, of Cur- 
wensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of establishing a Library 
Fund, together with the cordial cooperation of the Alumni Library 
Guild Association, the college is now able to make substantial addi- 
tions, annually, to the resources of the Library. 

The reading-room in the Library is furnished with the best of read- 
ing-room appliances. Its files are supplied with representatives of the 
best secular and religious papers, while many of the best American 
and foreign magazines are upon its tables. Students are thus enabled 
to keep familiar with the daily news, and also to become acquainted 
with the best current literature of the world. 



General Regulations 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examination of candidates for admission will take place on Tues- 
day of Commencement week, and on the day before the opening of the 
Fall term. 

Examinations will take place at the close of the Fall, Winter, and 
Spring terms, at mid-year, or by special action of the Faculty, upon 
the completion of an integral part of any subject. 

DEGREES 

The following degrees in cursu will be conferred by the colli. l 
students now in the college: 

Bachelor of Arts. — The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred 
on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Classical course. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. — The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy will 
be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the 
Latin-Scientific and Philosophical courses. 

Bachelor of Science. The degree of Bachelor of Science will be con- 
ferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Scientific 
course. 

On students of classes entering the college in September, 1012, 
and thereafter, the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred on 
their completion of the Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Philosophical 
courses; and the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred on 
such students on their completion of the Scientific course. 

\4astei "I Arts. I he degree of Mast* r of ^rts in . ursu will be con- 
ferred on those graduates of the college who shall have completed a 
course of stud) prescribed bj the professors in the se\ era I departments 
and approved l>.\ the Faculty, and who shall have passed a satisi 
examination thereon a1 the seal ol the college nol latei than Ma\ [5 
ol anj year, Examinations will be conducted in Maj ol each year by 
evcral professors undei whose direction the studies shall have 
been pursued. A charge <>l twentj dollars will be made foi the exami- 
nation, one-hall <»i which shall l»< payable when the student registi i s, 
w lu« h musl be bj Octobei 15. Graduates ol reputabli colleges who 
•I 1.1 1 1 complete in a latisfactorj mannei the course of t hi School ol Law 
;ii< eligible foi the degree "I Mastei ol tots, in cursu. W\ recipiei 
ih. <l. ; 1. . ill I .. . harged the 111 ual diploma fee ol five dollars, \ppli- 

1 I 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 43 

cation for information respecting the Master's degree must be made 
in writing to Dr. B. O. Mclntire, Chairman of Committee on Grad- 
uate Work. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Devotional services are held in the James W. Bosler Memorial 
Library Hall every morning, and all students are required to be present. 
Students are also required to attend the regular morning preaching 
services of the churches thev elect. 



GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

The government and discipline of the college are vested exclu- 
sively in the Faculty of the college, although the regulation of certain 
functions which have particular reference to the life of the student- 
body is left largely to the determination of the students themselves. 
A copy of the Rules and Regulations, established by the Trustees for 
the government of the college and the ordering of her work, is placed in 
the hands of each student upon matriculation, and he or she is expected 
to conform to the rules and regulations to which they subscribe. 

Conduct inconsistent with the general good order of the institution 
may result in suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. Any student found 
guilty of dishonesty in an examination or written recitation will be 
suspended for a period of not less than four weeks. Suspended students 
are required to go to their homes, and parents or guardians are notified 
of the facts. 

Report of attention to college duties and of the deportment of each 
student is made at the close of each term to students personally, if of 
legal years; otherwise to parents or guardians. Special reports will 
be sent out whenever deemed necessary by the Faculty. 



COLLEGE BILLS 

General charge to students $125 00 

Room-rent $8 to 35 00 

Laboratory — Botanical, Chemical, Physical, Anatomical, or 

Zoological, each 12 50 

Laboratory — Biological 5 00 

Athletic charge, unanimously recommended by students 8 00 

Charge for "The Dickinsonian," unanimously recommended by 

students 1 00 

Students presenting scholarships will be credited on general charges 
for their face value. 



44 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LLOYD HALL 

For ladies residing in Lloyd Hall the total charge is $375 per year, 
payable in three installments within ten days of the opening of each 
term, or within ten days of their arrival. This sum will cover all 
expenses for furnished rooms, bed-furnishing, lights, steam-heating, 
board; everything, indeed, save personal laundry, books, and labora- 
tory charges. All ladies non-residents of the town, are expected to 
room in the Hall. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS, REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

When two students from the same family are present in the college 
at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent is made. 

Students who, at their own request, room alone, are charged the full 
rent of the room. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent themselves 
from college work for the whole or major portion of any term, and who 
present themselves for examination in said work, will be charged one- 
half of the regular rate for the period of their absence from college work. 

During the college year two bills are presented, one tor the Fall 
term and the other covering the charges for the Winter and Spring 
terms combined. It should be observed that the fall term bill is for 
two-fifths of the academic year, and the combined Winter and Spring 
term bill is for the remaining three-fifths. This latter may be paid in 
two installments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days following 

the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once and will be 
required by the noon of October 1-9 following. 

The combined \\ inter and Spring term bill will be presented within 
tin- ten davs following the opening of tin- Winter term. Payment is 
expected ai once ami will be required In the noon of January 15. 1 

paid in two installments, the one lor the Winter term and the Other 

loi the Spun- term, payments must be made b\ January ^-i and by 
Api il 1 s, reaped i\ elj . 

Extension <>l time will not be granted jot tin- payment <>l bills, unless 
u ritten application on (onus in be provided l>\ the treasun 1 ;•> made In • 
///< dates set lm tin a i>u\ an hi. Failure i<> attend i<> this maim will rende\ 
a student liable i<> exclusion from re< itations <>> from < "//< ^ . Vo n duction 

on mix hi in lull will In allowed /'" less limn Join irechs o\ continuous 

absence, lm nn\ cause, during an] pari <>/ am term, I <" a period <>j 
continuous absence in excess <>l fou\ weeks, </ reduction <>/ om-ball toe 
pro mill, 01 weekly, cbargt will be allowed, provided ffc< <;/>mm,< occurs 
through no fault <>l tin stud\ ni. 

V /;. Beginning with thi academu \<<m kji 1 i;.inn student con* 
>i((i(d with tin college, and (K>\ student proposing entrance, will be 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 45 

required to show a receipt signed by the treasurer of the college for the sum 
oj ten dollars before being admitted to the work of the class with which he 
is associated, the said sum to appear as a credit on the college bill for the 
Fall term. The same rule will be observed at the opening of the Winter 
term. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, or 
money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

The rooms in the college are secured to the students during term 
time only. * 

Damage. — The occupants of each room are held accountable for 
any damage to the room, and the cost must be paid promptly on 
presentation of bill. Any student proved to be guilty of wilful destruc- 
tion of, or damage to, college property, may be required to pay not 
only the cost of replacement, or repair, but also a fine as determined by 
the Faculty (not to exceed ten times the cost of repair), said fine to be 
placed to the credit side of the special damage account. When the 
students injuring property are unknown, the cost of repairs is assessed, 
toward the close of the college year, upon the whole body of students, 
as a special damage account. 

No student can have honorable dismissal, or certificate of progress 
in his studies, until his bills have been duly adjusted. 



GOWNS, HOODS, AND CAPS 

The college has adopted the regulations for academic caps and 
gowns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 1895. 

1 . Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black-stuff 
gown of the Oxford shape, but with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occa- 
sions a black-stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood lined with red 
silk, crossed by a chevron of white, six inches in breadth. 

3. Masters of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occasions 
a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors. 

4. Doctors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occasions 
a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for Bachelors, 
trimmed around the exterior edge with a cord or with a band, not more 
than four inches wide, of silk, satin, or velvet, distinctive of the depart- 
ment to which the degree pertains, as follows: Doctor of Literature, 
white; Doctor of Divinity, scarlet; Doctor of Laws, purple; Doctor of 
Philosophy, blue; Doctor of Science, gold-yellow. 

With the gown will be worn the Oxford cap, of serge for under- 
graduates and of broadcloth for graduates, with black tassels, except 
the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of velvet with tassels in 
whole or part of gold thread. 



46 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, during their 
term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the doctor's degree, with 
the hood appropriate to the degree that they severally have received. 
Members of the Board of Trustees, or of the Faculty, who have received 
degrees from other universities or colleges, shall be entitled to wear the 
costume appropriate to the same degree from Dickinson College, so 
long as they shall retain their official connection with the college. The 
President of the college may adopt such distinctive costume or badge 
as he shall choose, not inconsistent with the foregoing regulations. 



College Organizations 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The Belles Lettres and the Union Philosophical Societies, purely 
Iiterary in their character, nearly coeval with the college, have been 
maintained in continuous operation throughout most of its history. 
Harman Society, the organization of the young ladies, was founded 
in 1896. Not the least of the advantages of college residence is the 
special training secured in these societies. The halls in which they 
meet, ample in size and thoroughly equipped, are hardly surpassed 
anywhere. For nearly twenty years the work and worth of these socie- 
ties have been recognized in the following regulations: 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical con- 
test in connection with the college who shall not have been a member 
of one of the literary societies for at least three-fourths of the time of 
his or her connection with the college. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of Com- 
mencement Day who shall not have been a member of one of the lite- 
rary societies for at least one-half of the time of his or her connection 
with the college. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the college who shall not 
have made satisfactory adjustment of financial obligations to the 
literary society of which he or she has been a member. 

BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Howard W. Selby, '13. 
Vice-President- — Adam Nag ay, '14. 
Recording Secretary — T. M. B. Hicks, Jr., '14. 
Corresponding Secretary — Clarence G. Warfield, '15. 
Treasurer — Samuel L. Mohler, '14. 
Critic — Edgar H. Rue, '13. 
Clerk/ — Lester C. Hecht, '15. 

UNION PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Carl Hartzell, '13. 

Vice-President-CLARENCE W. Sharp, Law, '14. 
Recording Secretary — Franklin A. Kuller, '14. 
Corresponding Secretary — Thomas B. Brinton, '13. 
Treasurer — Walter A. Hearn, '14. 
Critic — W. D. Watkins, Law, '14. 
Clerk — Carlyle Reede Earp, '14. 
Censor — Harry E. Brumbaugh, '14. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— Frederick H. Bachman, '13. 

(47) 



48 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

HARMAN SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Miriam W. Blair, '13. 
Vice-President — E. Grace Brame, '14. 
Secretary — Helen Langfitt, '14. 
Treasurer — Harriet H. Stuart, '14. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

These Associations in the college are well organized, and do a most 
useful work. A large number of the students are actively connected 
with them and are zealous to forward their work. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Edgar H. Rue, '13. 

Vice-President — Howard W. Selby, '13. 
Corresponding Secretary — Raymond E. Marshall, '14. 
Recording Secretary — Wilson P. Sperow, '14. 
Treasurer — William II. Robinson, '14. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Mabel E. Krall, '14. 

Vice-President — Elizabeth M. Garner, '13. 
Secretary — Miriam W. Blair, '13. 
Treasurer- Martha I.. Johnson, '13. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

The trustees, in 1891, ordered thai the alumni be divided into 
four geographical districts, centering respectively in Baltimore, Phila- 
delphia, Wilmington, and Carlisle, and thai the alumni of each dis- 
trict elecl a trustee, to be known as an Alumni Trustee, having .ill 
privileges of trustees ol the college, rinse District Alumni \ 
ciations meet at such times as the) maj elect. Therean also a General 
Alumni Association and various l<u;il associations. 

GENERAL Al.UMNl ASSOCIATION 

Officers: Pn sideni Gen. Horatio ( , King, I I .1). 
\ i< < Pre idem .1. Henri Baker, I 
Mo rcoMBR^ P. Sellers. 
urei < 'i 1 »rci L Reed, Esq, 
Add retary, Carli le, P 1. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 49 

BALTIMORE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Rev. James C. Nicholson, D.D. 
First Vice-President — -Hon. Hammond Urner. 
Second Vice-President — Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. 
Treasurer — Carl F. New. 

Recording Secretary — Rev. Andrew B. Wood. 
Corresponding Secretary — William H. Davenport 
Executive Committee — David H. Carroll, D.D.*; Hon. George R. 

Willis; G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D.; Henry Shirk, Esq.; Rev. J. 

Frederick Heisse, D.D.; Harry L. Price, Esq.; Rev. John R. 

Edwards; Isaac T. Parks, Jr., Esq.; James E. Carey, Esq. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D. 
Address of Secretary, 505 Union Trust Building, Baltimore, Md. 

CARLISLE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Alexander H. Ege. 

Secretary and Treasurer — M. G. Filler. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 

Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — -Henry C. Longnecker, D.D.S. 
Vice-President — George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Thomas S. Lanard, Esq. 
Executive Committee — Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq.; Frysinger Evans, 
Esq.; Charles K. Zug, Esq.; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq.; Rev. 
Thomas W. Davis; William P. String. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — Charles J. Hepburn, Esq. 
Address of the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Hyman N. Levy. 

Vice-President — John Eastlack Taylor, Esq. 
Secretary — Frederick Starr Stitt, Esq. 
Treasurer — James Strayer, Esq. 

WILMINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Rev. Elmer L. Cross, Ped.D. 
Vice-President — Hon. Thomas N. Rawlins. 

Executive Committee — Rev. Ralph T. Coursey; Henry P. Cannon. 
Representative on the Board of Trustees — Henry P. Cannon. 

*Deceased. 



50 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

DICKINSON CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY 

Officers: President- — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 
Vice-President — T. Leonard Hoover. 
Secretary and Treasurer — L. Wellington Johnson. 
Executive Committee — Rhev T. Snodgrass; Harry I. Huber, Esq.; 

Frank D. Lawrence; Thomas J. Towers, Esq.; L. Wellington 

Johnson. 

THE ALUMNI FUND COMMITTEE 

*David H. Carroll, D.D., '68; Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; 
Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80; John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. Boyer, 
Esq., '88; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; 
William A. Jordan, Esq., '97; Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. 
Burchenal, Esq., '00; T. Leonard Hoover, '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., 
'00; George H. Bonner, Esq., '01; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Frank D. 
Lawrence, '02. 

Officers: Chairman — Henry P. Cannon, '70, Bridgeville, Del. 

Vice-Chairman — George D. Chenoweth, '68, Woodbury, N. J. 
Secretary — Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa. 
Treasurer — C. W. Prettyman, '91, Carlisle, Pa. 
Executive Committee — Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; T. 

Leonard Hoover, '00; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr.. 'oaj Frank I). Law- 

r] \< 1 , '02; Boy i) I 1 1 Spahr, Esq., '00, Secretary, 1 242 1 and Title 

Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

In September, i<S86, the Alpha Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, the lust iii tin- State <>i Pennsylvania, was organized. Only 
students finallj i>ass<«l Foi graduation an- eligible to membership, and 
of these onlj those <»l high rlass standing or giving promise ol unusual 
achievement. Graduates <»l former years, not belou the firsl Fourth ol 
their classes, and nun ol eminence in professional life, arc also cliuil>U 
to membership. 

Officers: Presidenl Henry F. Whiting. 
\ u i Pic idenl Mervi ( • Filler. 
etai i' "i F. Mohler. 

I 1 . 1 iim • I 1 IRR1 1 E. CRAVER. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 51 

THE DICKINSON LIBRARY GUILD 

The Dickinson Library Guild, composed of alumni and friends of 
Dickinson College, is organized for the purpose of creating a permanent 
endowment for the College Library, and membership in the Guild 
consists of those who make an annual contribution to the endowment 
fund of the Library. The membership is of five classes, or groups, as 
follows : 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 

" B, " " from five to ten " 

" C, " " " three 

" D, " " M two " " " 

E, " " one dollar " " 

In accordance with the action of the Board of Trustees of the col- 
lege, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the permanent 
endowment fund of the Library, the proceeds of which shall be devoted 
to the sole purpose of purchasing books by the Faculty Committee on 
Library. The current expenses of the organization shall be otherwise 
provided for. 
Directors: President — Bradford O. McIntire. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 

John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; J. Kirk Bosler, Esq., '97; Earl S. John- 
ston, '13. 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 

For some years the students in their organized capacity have exer- 
cised limited government over some of their own internal interests. This 
student government has applied especially to relations of one class with 
another, but has also influenced the life of the entire student-body. 

The student organization is called the Student Assembly, and the 
elected governing body is called the Senate. 

Senate: Luther E. Bashore, '13; Foster E. Brenneman, '13; J. 
Paul Brown, '14; Francis A. Dunn, '14; Reed G. Einstein, 'i6; Robert 
A. Garton, '13; Carl Hartzell, '13; Russell R. McWhinney, '15; 
Emory B. Rockwell, '14; Edgar H. Rue, '13; W. Howard Sharp, 13. 
Officers: President — Robert A. Garton, '13. 

Vice-President — Luther E. Bashore, '13. 

Secretary — Carl Hartzell, '13. 

Treasurer — Edgar H. Rue, '13. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

In the autumn of 1908 several of the more musically inclined 
students set on foot a movement which has resulted in the present 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

College Band. Originally simply a means of helping on the singing at 
the football games, it has outgrown its original purpose and is now one 
of the regular musical organizations of the college. It furnishes the 
music for college functions, and frequently gives concerts on the campus. 
Any student with musical ability is eligible to membership. Instruc- 
tion is provided for beginners, and students are encouraged to take up 
this sort of work. 

Officers: President — F. Neff Stroup, '13. 
Director — Herbert P. Holtzman, '13. 
Assistant Director — R. A. Long, Law, '13. 
Vice-President — Walter A. Hearn, '14. 
Secretary — T. M. B. Hicks, Jr., '15. 
Treasurer — Charles E. Wagner, '14. 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Francis A. Dunn, '14. 
Vice-President — C. W. Sharp, Law, '14. 
Secretary — Paul Rogers, '16. 
Treasurer — Fred. L. Mohler, '14. 
Assistant Treasurer — D. M. Wallace, '15. 
Advisory Committee — Henry M. Stephens, Carlisle. 

William W. Landis, Carlisle. 

Forrest E. Craver, Carlisle. 

Edward M. Biddi.e, Jr., Esq., Carlisle. 

(Term w ill expire 191 j.) 

William D. Boyi r, Esq., Scranton. 
I I < 1 in w ill expire 191 J.) 

J. Kirk Bosi er, Esq., ( larlish . 

i, lei in will expin 1913.) 

Raphael S. Hays, Carlisle. 

1 I ci 111 w ill expii e i'»i 1 

I iiw \kd M. Biddle, Esq., Philadelphia. 

I 1 < 1 m will expire 191 1 

Football Manager Wilson P. Sperow, '14. 

Assistant J. E. Spi rzN ts, ' 1 ■;. 

Baseball Manage] Emor^ B. Rockwell, '14. 

Assi' 1 mi Elton M. McInt< >sh, ' 1 1. 

Manager Outdoor Spon C. Merli Spancler, '13. 

Managei Indooi Sports J. I'm i Brown, *i i 

1 iptain Football ream Hyman Goldstein, Law, '15. 

Captain Baseball ream 1 1 \i<\ 1 , < H. Steckel, Law, '14. 

< iptain I 1 .i< I. I earn E. H. Rue, '13. 

< aptain G3 asti« ream J. W ^rri n Tii pon, '1 |. 

< aptain I ennis feam C. Merli Sp ^nci br, 'i ;. 



Prizes, Scholarships, and 
Beneficiary Funds 

PRIZES 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improvement 
in composition and declamation at an early stage in the college course, 
the literary societies have each instituted a yearly contest therein for 
their respective members from the Sophomore class. All the members 
of this class in the Belles Lettres Society have the option of competing, 
and a gold medal is awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest 
degree of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, as 
decided by judges chosen by the society. 

Awarded to Adam Nagay, West Pittston. 

The Biology Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of a friend, is 
awarded for excellence in the work of the Department of Biology, 
during the Junior or Senior year. 

Awarded to Earl S. Johnston, Honeybrook. 

The Caldwell Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of James 
Hope Caldwell, '8o, of New York City, is awarded to the male student 
of the Department of Oratory, who shall, in a public contest, excel in 
declamation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to D. Robert Davies, Lansford. 

The Cannon Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henry P. Can- 
non, of Bridgeville, Del., is awarded to that member of the Sophomore 
class who shall pass the most satisfactory examination in the Mathe- 
matics of the Sophomore year, together with the original Geometry 
of the Freshman year. 

Divided between Lester W. Auman, Mifflintown, and J. Warren 
Tilton, Hammonton, N. J. 

The Carlisle High School Scholarship Prize, of forty dollars, the 
gift of the college, is awarded to the student entering from the high 
school of Carlisle who has attained the highest rank in the work 
preparatory for college. 

The Clemens Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the Rev. 
Joseph Clemens, *94,< Chaplain United States Army, is awarded 
annually to the student of the Junior class, proposing the work of the 
ministry, who writes the best essay, or sermon, upon some subject 
bearing upon the work of foreign missions, the essay or sermon not 
to exceed fifteen hundred words, and to be presented to the 

(53) 



54 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

President of the college not later than May i of each year. A copy of 
the winning essay or sermon, in typewritten form, shall be forwarded 
to the donor of the prize. 

Not awarded, 191 2. 

The Dare Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the college, is 
awarded to that member of the graduating class of the Conway Hall 
Preparatory School who shall be found to have attained the highest 
excellence in the studies preparatory to any course of Dickinson 
College. 

Awarded to Charles Herbert Reitz, Mt. Carmel. 

The Samuel B. GofI Temperance Prizes, three in number, the 
first of fifty dollars, the second of thirty, and the third of twenty, the 
gift of Samuel B. GofF, Esq., of Camden, N. J., are awarded during 
the academic year to the students of the college who shall excel in 
orations, to be publicly delivered upon some phase of temperance work 
in the United States. 

Not awarded in 191 2. 

Note. — The purpose of Mr. GofF is to endow in the near future, 
a lectureship in the college, in the sum of five thousand dollars. 

The Jackson Scholarship Prizes, two in number, of fifty dol- 
lars each, established by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jackson, of Berwick, Pa., 
in memory of her husband, the late Col. Clarence Gearhart Jackson, 
are awarded annually to students entering from Williamsport Dickin- 
son Seminary who have attained the highest rank in scholarship, the 
scholarships to be good for the Freshman year only. 

The Johnson Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph II. 
Johnson, '05, of Milton, Pa., is awarded to that one of tin- literaiw 
SOciel us ol t he college w hose members shall excel in debate, said debate 

to be conducted according to the terms proposed l>\ the Faculty, and 
adopted by the respective societies. 

Awarded to the Belles Lettres Society, represented In Allied II. 
Aldridge, Fayetteville; Adam Nagay, Wesl 1'ittston; \\ . Gallowaj 
I \ Bon, Morstein. 

The Johnson Prize ol fifteen dollars, the gifl of Willis Fletcher 
Johnson, L.H.D., of Neu York City, is a wauled to the male studem 
who shall stand second in a public contesl in declamation, eithei 
11 01 dramatic. 

\ warded to I orraine Yeoman McAnney, Carlisle. 

1 in- Km); Scholarship Prize 1 awarded annually t<> tin graduate 
of the high school, Washington, D. ( electee 1 l>\ the principal t"i 
< m < ll« ii< i in 1 Ik studies preparatory to entrance in Dickinson Colli c, 
1 Ik scholarship to be enjoyed during 1 he Freshman yreai only. 

N01 d, 101 t. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

The McDaniel Prizes. Delaplaine McDaniel, Esq., late of Phila- 
adelphia, provided for the founding of certain scholarships, to be 
awarded on the ground of excellence in scholarship. The sum of five 
thousand dollars was given the college in trust, with provision that 
three prizes, equal in amount, be constituted from the annual income, 
and offered yearly to be competed for by the members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes, and with provision, further, that two of these 
prizes be awarded, one each ; to the two members of the former class, 
and the remaining prize to the member of the latter class who in 
such way as the authorities of the college prescribe, attain the highest 
average of excellence in the work of these classes respectively. 

Freshman class — First prize, divided between Hiester R. Hornber- 
ger, Sinking Spring, and David M. Wallace, Middletown. Second 
prize, divided between D. Rhea CorTman. Scotland, and J. Luther 
Neff, Gordon. 

Sophomore class — Samuel L. Mohler, Carlisle. 

The McLean Prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded to the 
female student of the Department of Oratory, who shall, in a public 
contest, excel in declamation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to M. Ruth Sellers, Carlisle. 

The Miller Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles O. 
Miller, Esq., of Stamford, Conn., is awarded to that member of the 
Freshman class who shall excel in forensic declamation. 

Awarded to Lorraine Yeoman McAnney, Carlisle. 

The Musser Prize of fifteen dollars-, the gift of Miss Minnesota 
Estelle Musser, of New York City, will be awarded to the female 
student who shall stand second in a public contest in declamation, 
either foiensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Grace Kawel, Millersburg. 

The Norristown (Pa.) High School Scholarship Prize of forty 
dollars, the gift of the college, will be awarded to that student from the 
high school of Norristown who, on entering, is recommended by the 
principal as having attained the highest rank in scholarship, the scholar- 
ship to be good for the Freshman year only. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes, four in number, of twenty- 
five dollars each, one for each of the college classes, offered by the late 
Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a memorial to his father, Gen. 
John Patton, for many years a faithful friend and trustee of the college, 
are awarded according to conditions established for the Patton Scholar- 
ship Prizes maintained for many years by his honored father. 

Senior class — Awarded to C. Clinton Bramble, Centreville, Md. 

Junior class — Awarded to Mary B. Robinson, Shippensburg. 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Fred L. Mohler, Carlisle. 

Freshman class — Awarded to Margaret A. Bream, Carlisle. 



56 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Pierson Prizes for oratory, established by Daniel Pierson, 
Esq., of Newark, N. J., gold and silver medals, are offered each year 
to be competed for by members of the Junior class in a public oratori- 
cal contest, which contest has for years been placed among the exer- 
cises of Commencement week. 

Gold Medal — Harry McKeown, Jr., Chester. Silver Medal — 
Wesley P. Griffiths, Williamstown. 

The Rees Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the Rev. Milton S. 
Rees, D.D., Rochester, N. Y., is awarded to that student who shall 
excel in English Bible. 

Awarded to Roy Ledden, Haleyville, N. J. 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize of fifty dollars, 
the gift of General James Fowler Rusling, LL.D., '54, Trenton, N. J., 
is awarded to that member of the Senior class who, at the end of a 
four years' course, shall be found to excel in scholarship and character, 
as determined by the Faculty. 

Awarded to Ernest H. Sellers, Carlisle. 

The Eva Fisher Savidge Prize of forty dollars, the gift of Henry 
W. Savidge, Esq., of Sunbury, Pa., in memory of his wife, Eva Fisher 
Savidge, is awarded as first prize to that member of the Senior class 
whose oration, in a public contest on Commencement Day, seems 
best in composition and delivery. Discontinued after 1912. 

Awarded to Charles W. Kitto, Pen Argyl. 

The Smith Prize of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert I lavs Smith, 
'()8, of San Francisco, Oil., is awarded as a second prize, to be distrib- 
uted equally among the members of tlie winning team iii the annual 
Inter-soeiet \ debate. 

Awarded to the winners of t lie Johnson prize abo\ e. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. As an incentive to improve- 
ment in composition and declamation at an early stage in the college 

COUrse, the literary societies have eaeh instituted a \earl\ contest 
therein lor their respeeti\e members from the Sophoinoie elass. \|| 

the members <»l this class in the Union Philosophical society have 
the option <>! competing, and a gold medal is awarded tin- contestant 
exhibiting the highesl degree of excellence in the arts to which the 
competition relates, as decided l>\ judges chosen l>\ the society. 
Awarded to I estei \\ . Vuman, Mifflin town. 

Tim Wtigg Prize, heretofore of fifty dollars, the gift oi \. 1 1, w 
'09,0! New ^oik, has been awarded i«" excellence in Economics, 

Award* d to ( hai lea \. Vahn, I [ai 1 isl ■ 

Mm Wagg Prize, hereaftei a gold medal, the gift oi A. II. \\ 
'09, oi \<-w York, will be awarded to that member <>f the class in 
American I lr t<»i \ who shall presenl the besl competitive essa j on an 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 57 

assigned subject pertaining to the life and public services of some dis- 
tinguished American closely related to Dickinson College as founder, 
trustee, executive, professor, or alumnus. 

The Walkley Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of W. R. Walkley, 
D.C.L., in memory of his only son, Winfield Davidson Walkley, 
who died March 1 1, 1903, is awarded as a second prize to that member 
of the Freshman class who shall excel in declamation, either forensic 
or dramatic. 

Awarded to Gilbert Malcolm, New York City. 

BENEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of funds and scholarships have been established in various 
ways by friends of education in general and of the college in particular, 
and are awarded largely by the donors or by the president to such 
students as may be in need of financial help. It is doubtful whether 
the same amount of money expended in any other way would accom- 
plish a greater service in the cause of education than these small sums 
used to supplement the insufficient means at the command of worthy 
young people seeking an education. It is hoped that their number 
may be largely increased by men and women concerned to do good 
with their means. 

The Alumni Loan Fund of fifty dollars, contributed by an 
alumnus, to be loaned from year to year to students in need of tem- 
porary help, to be repaid within a year and again loaned. 

Baltimore Medical College Scholarship, tuition and examina- 
tion fees, to be available for the appointee for the first year of his four 
years' course in the medical school. 

The Bodine Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by George 
I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Arthur Milby Burton Scholarship of fifty dollars, estab- 
lished by Miss Mary R. Burton, for the education of worthy young 
men for the ministry, preference being given to applicants residing 
within the limits of the Philadelphia Conference. 

The Chandler Scholarship of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
D/ Harry Chandler, of Vineland, N. J. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship of fifty 
dollars established by Mrs. Emma L. Keen, of Philadelphia, as a 
memorial to her father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, is awarded annually 
to young men preparing for the ministry. 

The Scholarship? of one hundred dollars, the gift of a 

lady of New York City. 



58 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, 
of New York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, students from 
New York City and vicinity having prior claim. 

The J. W. Feight Memorial Scholarship, the interest on one 
thousand dollars, was established by J. W. Fisher, Esq., of Newport, 
Tenn., in loving memory of the character and services of the Reverend 
J. W. Feight, formerly of the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. The following conditions are observed 
in its award: First, the recipient shall, if possible, be from within the 
bounds of the Central Pennsylvania Conference; if from any other 
territory, that of the Baltimore Conference shall be preferred. Second, 
the award shall be, so far as possible, in the form of a loan, to be returned 
as soon as possible after graduation, interest on the loan to begin two 
years after the date of graduation. 

The Freeman Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by Frank 

A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, interest on one 
thousand dollars, the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of 
John Gillespie, Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her 
father. 

The Mary Louise Huntington Fund, the gift of Miss Man 
Ionise Huntington, of Brooklyn, N. Y., is used to aid young men oi' 
limited means who are preparing for missionary, ministerial, or educa- 
tional work. 

The Lockyer Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by Mark 

B. Lockyer, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Theodore F. Miller Scholarship of' fiftj dollars, the gilt ol 
'I beodore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Valeria Schall Scholarship of twenty-five dollars Is used 
in assisting such young men as, in the estimation ol the President and 
Faculty <>| the college, are <»l good character, scholarly habits, and 
deserving oi assistance, and who are approved candidates foi the 

( In isl Ian minisl i \ . 

The Charles T. S< hoen Scholarships, ten in number, ol hlt\ 

.loll us each, established l>\ Charles I. Schoen, Esq., of Philadelphia, 

.in awarded annuall} to such young men and women as ma\ be 
it< (I l»\ t Im donoi 01 l»\ t he President. 

lh« A. lien Smith Scholarship, endowed, averaging one hun- 

iln .1 dollai 1 1'- : iii "i t h. Lit. Mi I h.M I . Smith, oi 

t. ,. in I,,. mon oi I,, i broth i th< lat< I Ion. V Hen Smith. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

The Cornelia Thumm Scholarship, the annual interest on nine 
hundred and fifty dollars, the legacy of the late Mrs. Cornelia A. 
Thumm, of Philadelphia, is used to aid such students as may be 
designated by the President. 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship of fifty dollars, estab- 
lished by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is awarded 
annually to such students as may be designated by the donor or by 
the President. 

The Rev. William Wood Scholarship of fifty dollars, the gift 
of Miss Sarah Wood, of Trenton, N. J., is awarded annually to such 
students as may be designated by the donor or by the President. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The trustees have authorized the founding of endowed scholarships 
of one thousand dollars each, whose object is to aid in extending 
the privileges of the college to young men of promise otherwise unable 
to command them. 

Such scholarships may be constituted as follows: 

i . The donor of each scholarship shall have the privilege of naming 
it, and of prescribing the conditions on which it shall be awarded. 

2. Scholarships may be maintained by the annual payment of fifty 
dollars, as interest, until the principal sum of one thousand dollars is 
paid. They lapse, of course, when the interest fails, unless the princi- 
pal or interest on the same has been paid. 

3. Churches contributing one thousand dollars each, may, if they 
desire it, place upon that foundation the sons of their ministers, or, in 
lieu of that, mav nominate some other candidate to receive its avails. 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 

the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof shall be sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated under 
the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and premises, 

that is to say to have and to 

hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its successors 
and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, or 
knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the Presi- 
dent of the college, Eugene Allen Noble, Carlisle, Pa., and, if prac- 
ticable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes of the 
testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have tin bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or 

the endowment of a chair, or lor a building, or tor the endowment of a 
Scholarship, arc requested to make specific mention of the same in the 

will pro\ ision. 






Index 



PAGE 

Admission 20 

Admission, Requirements for. 2 1-24 

Alumni Associations 48-50 

Alumni Fund Committee 50 

Alumni Statistics 7 

Athletic Association 52 

Athletic Field 40 

Bills, College 43~45 

Calendar, College 4, 5, 6 

Certificates 20 

Courses of Study 19 

Degrees 42 

Degrees Conferred, 1912 16-18 

Examinations 42 

Expenses 43~45 

Faculty, College 12-14 

General Regulations 42-46 

Government and Discipline. ... 43 

Gowns, Hoods, and Caps 45 

Grounds and Buildings 39 

Gymnasium 40 

Library 41 

Library Guild 51 



PAGF 

Literary Societies 47, 48 

Lloyd Hall 40, 44 

Material Equipment 39^4 1 

Organizations, College 47~5 2 

Order of Studies — 

Freshman Class 2 5 _2 7 

Sophomore Class 27-30 

Junior Class 30-34 

Senior Class 35 _ 38 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 50 

Prizes 53^57 

Scholarships 57S9 

Scholarships, Endowed 59 

Senate and Assembly, Student. . 5 1 

South College 40 

Trustees, Board of 8-1 1 

Visitors, Official 15 

Worship 43 

Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion 48 

Young Women's Christian 

Association 48 



J. Horace McFarland Company, Harrisburg, Pa. 



« 



Btcfemston College 
Pulletm 



Vol. VIII 



NOVEMBER, 1913 



The Catalogue 

1913-1914 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY— MAY-JULY 
NOVEMBER 



No. 3 



t 



Entered as second-class matter, January 19, 1906, at the post-office at Carlisle, Pa., 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



ILLINOIS 
1913 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



CATALOGUE OF 



B tcfcmsfon College 



1913-1914 



131st Annual Session 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MDCCCCXIII 



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»t 1 III 1 1 I t 1 1 1 li I I I I I 1 1 1 ll ' l 1 1 1 11 ft II 1 II 1 HI It 1 1 1 1 ' 



COLLEGE CALENDAR-1913-1914 

FALL TERM— 1913 

September 17, Wednesday Entrance examination. 

September 18, Thursday Fall Term begins. 

September 19, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

December 8-14 Week of Prayer in College. 

December 20, Saturday, 10.30 a. M..Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM— 1914 

January 6, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Winter Term begins. 

January 16, Friday Inter-Society Debate. 

February 20, Friday Freshman Contest for Miller and 

Walkley Prizes. 

March 6, Friday Intercollegiate Debates. 

March 19, Thursday, 10.30 a.m — Winter Term ends. 

SPRING TERM— 1914 

March 31, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Spring Term begins. 

April 24, Friday Sophomore Oratorical Contests. 

May 22-28 — . Final examinations, Seniors. 

June 1-6 Final examinations, other classes. 

June 3, Wednesday Commencement exercises of Con- 
way Hall — School for Boys. 

June 6, Saturday, 8 p.m Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 

Prizes. 

June 7, Sunday, 11 a.m Baccalaureate sermon by President 

Noble. 

6.30 p.m Campus song service. 

7.30 p..m Address before the College Chris- 
tian Associations. 

June 8, Monday, 2 p.m Senior Class Day exercises. 

4 p.m Annual meeting of the Incorpora- 
tors of the School of L,aw. 

4 p.m Commencement play by Dramatic 

Club. 

7 p.m Annual meeting of the Trustees of 

the College. 

5 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SPRING TERM— 1914, continued 
8 p..m Concert by the musical organiza- 
tions of the College. 

io p.m Junior Promenade. 

June 9, Tuesday, 9.30 a.m. Class reunions, followed by Alum- 

ni Association meetings. 
5.00 p.m Meeting of Phi Beta Kappa So- 
ciety. 

8-11 p.m President's Reception. 

June 10, Wednesday, 8.15 a.m Class advancements. 

9.30 A. M , Commencement exercises of the 

College and School of Law. 
12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 

FALL TERM— 1914 

September 16, Wednesday Examinations for admission. 

September 17, Thursday, 10.30 a.m. Fall Term begins. 
December 18, Friday, 10.30 a.m. ...Fall Term ends. 



ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total 5,411 

Legal profession 1,040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits , 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of the United States 1 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 3 

Attorney-Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 39 

Members of State Assemblies 132 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 3 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church 1 

Presidents of colleges 42 

Heads of professional schools 10 

Professors in colleges 135 

Superintendents of schools 66 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools 260 

Instructors in lower-grade schools 610 

Note. — This record, it should be observed, does not fully express the useful 
work done by the College, as in the earlier days of the institution the records 
were but indifferently preserved, and as it was last revised more than three 
years ago. 

7 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE President 

Rev. BISHOP LUTHER B. WILSON Vice-President 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Secretary 

JOHN S. BURSK Treasurer 

EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., Ex-Officio. 

TERM EXPIRES 1914 

J. HENRY BAKER, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, JR., Esq Carlisle 

GEORGE W. DAVISON, LL.D New York City 

Rev. WILLIAM W. EVANS, D.D Washington, D. C. 

Hon. ROBLEY D. JONES Snow Hill, Md. 

Gen. HORATIO C. KING, LL.D Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ALEXANDER SIMPSON, Jr., LL.D Philadelphia 

BOYD LEE SPAHR, Esq Philadelphia 

C. PRICE SPEER Chambersburg 

Ri:v.. WILLIAM A. STEPHENS, D.D Carlisle 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Philadelphia 

TERM EXPIRES 1915 

Ki.v. LOUIS E BARRETT, D.D Chestcrtown, Md 

WILLIAM I) BOYER, Esq Sainton 

GEORGE I). CHENOWETH, ScD Woodbury, N.J. 

JOSEPH E HOLLAND Milford, Del. 

11 \i'LY I. HUBER, Esq Brooklyn. N. Y. 

ISAAC McCURLEY, Esq Baltimore Ifd. 

K'r.v. Thomas K. MARTINDALE, D.D Salisbury, Md 

CHARLES B. PRETTYMAN Philadelphia, Pa 

CORNELIUS W. PRETTYMAN, D.D Smyrna, Del 

JOHN' A. SECOB Uport, In. I. 

•THOM \S C SMITH, M.D Washington, D, C 

1 !.-•. 1 h\\ \i'i» C STOKES Trenton, N. J. 

G LANE TANE1 HILL, M.D Baltimore, lid 

Ri . 1.1 tint T SVIDERM \x. i>.D Baltimore, Md 

♦ I )(( c.iscd. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 9 

TERM EXPIRES 1916 

Rev. FRANKLIN F. BOND, D.D Philadelphia 

HENRY P. CANNON Bridgeville, Del. 

MELVILLE GAMBRILL Wilmington, Del. 

CHARLES J. HEPBURN, Esq Philadelphia 

Rev. FRANK B. LYNCH, D.D Philadelphia 

Gen. JAMES F. RUSLING, LL.D Trenton, N. J. 

WILMER W. SALMON Rochester, N. Y. 

WILLIAM L. WOODCOCK, Esq Altoona 

TERM EXPIRES 1917 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE, Carlisle 

FRANK C. BOSLER, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. WILLIAM P. DAVIS, D.D Camden, N. J. 

ROBERT W. IRVING, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. GEORGE B. WIGHT, D.D Trenton, N. J. 

HENRY M. WILSON, M.D Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. BISHOP LUTHER B. WILSON, LL.D New York City 

CHARLES K. ZUG Philadelphia 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. Henry Baker Charees J. Hepburn 

Edward M. BiddeE, Jr. Robert W. Irving 

Frank C. BoslER Eugene A. Nobee 

Henry P. Cannon Charles W. Straw 

Edward W. Biddee, Chairman 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

G. Lane Taneyhiee Wilmer W. Saemon 

Eugene A. Nobee, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON TRUSTEES 

Wileiam W. Evans Boyd L. Spahr 

Eugene A. Nobee Isaac McCureey 

Horatio C. King, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Frank C. Bosler Robkrt W. Irving 

Eugkne A. Nobee, Chairman 

EFFICIENCY COMMITTEE 
Gsorce D. Ciiknowi.tii James F. Rtsling 

William P. Davis Ai.i tXANDSB Simpson. Jr. 

Hanky I. Ilini.u C. Tuui: Sntfti 

Frank B. Lynch Edwaid C Stokm 

Chaiias K. Zug, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON CONWAY HALL 

Thomas Iv M ahtinu \i.i; Vkankun Iv BONO 

I,i ihi.u T, Wimi.kman Edwaid w. Biodu 

E i qsni v \itr.i.i;. Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON AUDIT 

Mi i. \ ii. 1. 1; C.ami:k'H.i. mm W. I'ki u\ man 

i ii .1 \ p Cam won , Chaii man 

to 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 

June, 1913 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. James L. McLain Rev. Franck H. Havenner 

Rev. John R. Edwards Rev. Francis R. BaylEy 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev„ T. S. Wilcox L. P. Llewellyn 

Rev. Wilbur H. Norcross J. A. Affleck 

Rev. Vaughn T. Rue W. L. Woodcock, Esq. 

Rev. F. T. Bell G. B. Keim 

*Rev. N. E. Cleaver W. H. Stevenson 

NEWARK 

Rev. Herbert F. Randolph Rev. Charles M. Anderson 

Rev. Henry J. Johnston 

NEW JERSEY 
Rev. Alfred Wagg Rev. Frederick B. Harris 

NEW YORK EAST 

Rev. William W. W. Wilson Rev. Richard S. Povey 

PHILADELPHIA 

♦Rev. William L. McDowell Rev. Milton H. Nichols 

Rev. Sylvanus G. Grove Rev. George P. Beck 

Rev. Linn Bowman 

WILMINGTON 

Rev. John J. Bunting Rev. S. M. Morgan 

WYOMING 

Rev. George M. Bell Rev. George N. Underwood 



♦Deceased. 



11 



FACULTY 



EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, L.H.D., LL.D., President 
JAMES HENRY MORGAN. Ph.D., Dean 

AND PROFESSOR OF GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph.D. 

THOMAS BEAVER PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 

SUSAN POWERS HOFFMAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS 

WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS, Sc.D. 

PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER, A.M. 

PROFESSOR OF LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATI RP. 

CORNELIUS WILLIAM PRETTYMAN, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

MONTGOMERY PORTER SELLERS, A.M. 

PROKKSSOR Of NHKTORIC AM) VHl! K w.i.is B LANOUAGI 

i.inx CUSHING PRINCE, A.M.. i.l.h. 
i'K(ht:ssor Of history 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, I'm D 

PlOfl ' 01 Of I HfMlSTKY 

FORREST EUGENE CM K\ ER, A M, 

apm mt fropkjsor or MATStMAYXCS, .\\n PBYttCAl imkittor 

L2 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 13 

FACULTY, continued 

LEONARD STOTT BLAKEY, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OP ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

GEORGE FRANKLIN COLE, A.M. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OE ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

LUCRETIA JONES McANNEY, M.O. 

INSTRUCTOR IN ORATORY 

MISS SARAH K. EGE 

LADY IN CHARGE OE METZGER COLLEGE BUILDING 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS 

SECRETARY OE THE EACUETY 



BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE 

LIBRARIAN 



JOHN S. BURSK 

TREASURER 



SARA M. BLACK 

SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

Eugene Allen Noble James Henry Morgan 

Mervin Grant Filler Cornelius Wm. Prettyman 

John Frederick Mohler Guy Howard Shadinger 

GRADUATE WORK 

Bradford Oliver McIntire Leon Cushing Prince 

Montgomery P. Sellers 

LIBRARY 

Eugene Allen Noble Bradford Oliver McIntire 

Mervin Grant Filler James Henry Morgan 

Montgomery P. Sellers 

ATHLETICS 

Forrest Eugene Craver William Weidman Landis 

Henry Matthew Stephens 

SPECIAL STAFF 1913-14 

Rev. Isaac HEADLAND, D.D., New York City. 
Krv. Jamks Houvkk, Borneo. 

Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, D.D., President Allahabad College, India 

Ri.v. Bishop James II. Darlington, D.D., Ilarrisburg. 

Rtv. DwiGBI A. Jordan, D.D., New York City. 

A. Parker Nevin, Esq., New York City. 

Professor Edward M. Sait, PhD., Columbia University, New York 

City. 
Professor O. R Sipkr, Ph.D., Merchantvillr. N. J. 



u 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE 

June 11, 1913 
I. HONORIS CAUSA 

ScD.— DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 

Guy L. Hunner, M.D., Baltimore, Md. 

Litt.D.— DOCTOR OF LETTERS 

Robert M. Gay, Baltimore, Md. 

S.T.D.— DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY 

Rev. Bishop William Burt, Buffalo, N. Y. 

D.D.— DOCTOR OF DIVINITY 

Rev. Edmund D. Soper, Delaware, Ohio. 
Rev. Franck H. Havenner, Keyser, W. Va. 

A.M.— MASTER OF ARTS 

FitzRoy Carrington, Boston, Mass. 

II. IN CURSU 

A.M.— MASTER OF ARTS 

Adams, Forrest Edwin Hoch, Harry Keller 

Dickinson, 'n Dickinson, 'n 

Aldridge, Alfred Henderson Ledden, Walter Eare 

Dickinson, '12 Dickinson, 'io 

Andrus, Fred L. Lindsay, George Ceair 

Dickinson, '12 Dickinson, '08 

Brambee, Charles Clinton Lingee, Charles Percival 

Dickinson, '12 Dickinson, '07 

Briner, Charles S. Lorenz, Robert Donaed 

Dickinson, '11 Dickinson, '11 

Ganoe, William Adleman Miller, Thomas Byron 

Dickinson, '02 Dickinson, 'n 

Carothers, Ethel Rebecca Myers, George Eiwin 

Dickinson, '07 Dickinson, 'io 

Hartzeel, Lina Miller Myers, Lottie Lowe 

Dickinson, '10 Dickinson, '12 

15 



16 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



A. M.— MASTER OF ARTS, continued 



Norcross, Wilbur Harrington 

Dickinson, '07 
Philhower, Charles Alpaugh 

Dickinson, '09 
Rawlins, Charles Henry, Jr. 

Dickinson, '10 
Richmond, Leon Henry 

Dickinson, 'n 
Sayre, Woodburn Johnson 

Dickinson, '10 
Shaffer, Roy Lee 

Dickinson, '09 
Shenton, Clarence George 

Dickinson, 'io 
Shepherd, Clarence Moore 

Dickinson, 'io 



Shields, Richard Allen 

Dickinson, '12 
Smith, Ray Patton 

Dickinson, 'n 
Storey, Henry W., Jr. 

Dickinson, 'io 
Stuart, George Spangler 

Dickinson, '09 
VanAuken, Charles 

Dickinson, '12 
VanBlarcom, Martin 

Dickinson, 'n 
VanHook, Carlton R. 

Dickinson, '12 
Yeingst, Wilbur M. 

Dickinson, '97 



Yahn, Charles Arnold 
Dickinson, '12 

A.B.— BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Blair, Miriam Woods 
Brinton, Thomas Baker 
Daniels, Harry 
Dum, Miriam Anna 
Fisher, Anna I. 
Goudir, Aubrey Blaine 
Kisner, Hazkl Karkan 



Leaman, Clara Jeannette 
McIntirf, John Vinton 
Rinker, Edith Sabina 
rockmaker, hyman 
Rue, Edgar Heilman 
Shuck, Joseph Martin 
Whistler, Edward Livingston 



Wuitmover. Raymond Britton 



Ph.B.— BACHELOR 

Alling, Harry Theodore 
Hachman, Frederick HENRY 
Bashoke, Litiii.u Edward 
Brenneman, John Elder 
BsOflUS, Warren Ancil 

B CHECK, Al.LAN ]'*KANK1,IN 

Conovek, James Milton 

Davies, Russell T, 

I ■ . 1 - 1 1. in ■;. I'j <.i'.ne 

I'M '.in n 11. |.in n Cik mi kon 

Garner, Ei.isau.i 11 Mary 

Gaston, Robsbt AlTBUBI 



OF PHILOSOPHY 

Gerhard, Helen SCHUlTl 
GsoOlrt, John Cooper 

Gsi i-i:k, Jessie Louisa 
GuNTgs, William Arthur 
I i.\Kr/i:i.i„ Caw 
I Ioli.and, Homer Cecil 
I lui.i/M w, I li;i<m'ivT IV.tkk 

IIoSLER, BENJAMIN IlAROI.D 

Job n on, m \k i'h \ ].\ m 1 

JOHNtTOlC, Karl SteinEord 
K [RKPATUCK, CSAWVOSD Ni'\i 

I . I I M -I N, K'dV 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



17 



Ph.B.— BACHELOR OF 

Logan, George Edward 
McCune, William Alexander 
McKeown, Henry, Jr. 
McMeen, Claude Vincent 
Montgomery, Helen Kline 
Myers, Joel Howard 
Newman, Luther Leon 
Park, Elda Rebecca 
Paterson, Robert Bruce 
Potter, John Weseey 



PHILOSOPHY, continued 
Reddig, C. Mansfield 
Rettew, Pierce 
Robinson, Mary Boyd 
Sharp, Wileiam Howard 
Spangler, Clarence Merle 
Stauffer, Hilda Lauretta 
Stroup, Franklin Nefe 
Tatnal, Edith Marshall 
West, Philip Earl 
Willey, Earl D. 



Sc.B.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Evans, Howard David Selby, Howard W. 

LL.B.— BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Burd, William Harrison 
Dorn, Stacy Byron 
Dughi, Massimo Vincent 
Durkin, James Ambrose 
Evans, Stanley Marshall 
Hoch, Harry Keller 
Hollister, Joseph Samuel 
Kountz, Ambrose Edward 
McCall, Lisle D. 
Mieler, Thomas Byron 



Myers, John Eyster 
Peppets, Joseph Adam 
Rickles, Samuel Leon 
Rogers, Howard Sadler 
Routh, Robert 
Schaefeer, Lloyd Merkel 
Storey, Henry W., Jr. 
Van Blarcom, Martin 
Wallace, David Waddell 
Westover, Joseph Harrison 



Admission 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In all 
cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, and, 
if from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college 
will not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for work done in approved secondary schools are 
accepted, and students are admitted to the college on certification 
that the requirements for admission have been fully met ; but cer- 
tificates covering less than the full requirements may or may not 
be accepted, depending upon the amount of the shortage and the 
conditions under which the work was done. However, students in 
arrears in preparation one full year's work in English, or more 
than one year's work in any other study, will be examined on all 
the work offered in the subject or subjects in which there is this 
deficiency. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation from schools or semi- 
naries will not be accepted, but blank forms of certificates for 
work done will be furnished by the college on application, and it 
is required that these certificates be sent to the college direct from 
the principal of the preparatory school. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the college may or may 
not be accepted, depending upon the institution in which the ad- 
vanced work has been done, and the branches of college work for 
which the certificate is offered. In other words, candidates for 
ludb advanced standing must show that they are capable of doing 
the work of the advanced classes for which they apply. 

ON EXAMINATION 

lA.iminat ions for admission are held on Tuesday of commence- 
ment week, ind on the day before the opening of the fall term. 

For ftdvtnced standing students must show that tliev have 

covered in i satisfactory manner l><>th the preparatory work roi 
entrance to college and the studies previously punned by the classes 

the] propOSC tO enter. 

18 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 19 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
CLASSICAL COURSE 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose 
work is notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, 
or division into paragraphs. 

I. Reading and Practice. — A certain number of books will 
be recommended for reading, ten of which, selected as prescribed 
below, are to be offered for examination. The form of exami- 
nation will usually be the writing of a paragraph or two on each 
of several topics, to be chosen by the candidate from a consider- 
able number — perhaps ten or fifteen — set before him in the ex- 
amination paper. The treatment of these topics is designed to test 
the candidate's power of clear and accurate expression, and will 
call only for a general knowledge of the substance of the books. 
In every case knowledge of the book will be regarded as less im- 
portant than the ability to write good English. In place of a part 
or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an exercise 
book, properly certified to by his instructor, containing com- 
positions or other written work done in connection with the read- 
ing of the books. In preparation for this part of the requirement, 
it is important that the candidate shall have been instructed in 
the fundamental principles of rhetoric. 

For the years 1913-15. 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books provided for 
reading are arranged in the following groups, from which at least 
ten units are to be selected, two from each group: 

Group I. The Old Testament, comprising at least the chief 
narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, 
Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and Esther ; 
the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, 
V, XV, XVI, XVII ; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of 
Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Vergil's 7Entid. The 
Odyssey, Iliad, and yEneid should be read in English trans- 
lations of recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted. 

Group II. Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," "Midsummer 
Night's Dream," "As You Like It," "Twelfth Night," "King 
Henry the Fifth," "Julius Caesar." 

Group III. Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe," Part I; Goldsmith's 
"Vicar of Wakefield;" either Scott's "Ivanhoe" or "Quentin 



20 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Durward;" Hawthorne's "House of the Seven Gables;" either 
Dickens' "David Copperfleld" or "A Tale of Two Cities;" 
Thackeray's "Henry Esmond;" Mrs. Gaskell's "Cranford;" 
George Eliot's "Silas Marner;" Stevenson's "Treasure Island." 

Group IV. Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," Part I; the "Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers" in the Spectator; Franklin's Auto- 
biography (condensed); Irving's "Sketch Book;" Macaulay's Es- 
says on Lord Clive and Warren Hastings; Thackeray's "English 
Humorists;" Selections from Lincoln, including at least the two 
Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettys- 
burg, the Last Public Address, and Letter to Horace Greeley, 
along with a brief memoir or estimate; Parkman's "Oregon 
Trail;" either Thoreau's "Walden," or Huxley's Autobiography 
and selections from Lay Sermons, including the addresses on "Im- 
proving Natural Knowledge," "A Liberal Education," and "A 
Piece of Chalk;" Stevenson's "Inland Voyage" and "Travels with 
a Donkey." 

Group V. Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Books 
II and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, 
Cowper, and Burns; Gray's "Elegy in a Country Churchyard" 
and Goldsmith's "Deserted Village;" Coleridge's "Ancient Mar- 
iner" and Lowell's "Vision of Sir Launfal ;" Scott's "Lady of the 
Lake;" Byron's "Childe Harold," Canto IV, and "The Prisoner 
of Chillon;" Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Book 
IV, with especial attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; 
Poe's "The Raven ;" Longfellow's "The Courtship of Miles 
Standish" and Whittier's "Snow-Bound ;" Macaulay's "Lays of 
Ancient Rome" and Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum ;" Tennyson's 
"Garcth and Lynette," "Lancelot and Elaine," and "The Pass 
ing of Arthur;" Browning's "Cavalier Tunes," "The Lost 
Leader," "How they Brought the Good News from Ghent to 
Aix," "Home Thoughts from Abroad," "Home Thoughts from 
the Sea," "Incident of the French Camp," "Herve Riel," "Pliei 
dippides," "My Last Duchess," "Up at a Villi — Down in the 
City." 

II. Sn dv and PRACTICE.- This pan of the examination pre- 
supposes the thorough study of each of the works named below. 
The examination will he upon subject-matter, form, and struc- 
ture In addition, the candidate m;iv he requited to answer ques- 
tions involving the essentials of English grammar, and questions 
on the Leading farts in those periods of English literaiy history to 

which the prescribed works belong, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

For the years 19 13- 15 the books set for this part of the ex- 
amination will be as follows. 

Shakespeare's "Macbeth;" Milton's "Comus," "L' Allegro," "II 
Penseroso;" Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration; Macaulay's "Life of Johnson," or Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns. 

Greek. — Grammar; Xenophon's "Anabasis," four books; 
Homer's "Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day to 
day in preparation, is recommended, and ability to write simple 
Greek sentences is required. 

History. — Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States. 
The following works will indicate the amount required: Oman's 
"History of Greece," Lehighton's "History of Rome" (to the 
close of the reign of Augustus), or Smith's "Smaller History of 
Rome," McLaughlin's "History of the United States for Schools." 

Latin. — I. The Latin reading required of candidates for ad- 
mission to college, without regard to the prescription of par- 
ticular authors and works, shall be not less in amount than Caesar, 
"Gallic War," I-IV; Cicero, "The Orations against Catiline," 
"For the Manilian Law," and "For Archias;" Vergil, "^neid," 
I-VI. 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by 
the schools from the following authors and works : Caesar, "Gallic 
War" and "Civil War;" Nepos, "Lives;" Cicero, "Orations" and 
"De Senectute;" Sallust, "Catiline" and "Jugurthine War;" Ver- 
gil, "Bucolics," "Georgics," and "^neid ;" and Ovid, "Metam- 
orphoses," '/Fasti," and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recommended 
by the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; 
Algebra through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, in- 
cluding the solution of one hundred or more original exercises. 

LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

(a) English, History, Latin, and Mathematics, the same as 
for the Classical course. 

(b) French or German. Three years' work, recitations daily, 
in either French or German or two years' work in French or Ger- 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

man and one year's work in either Botany, Chemistry, Physics, or 
Physical Geography. 

The preparation in French should comprise careful drill in the 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and 
the common irregular verbs, the inflection of adjectives and the 
use of the participles and pronouns, constant attention being paid 
to pronunciation. Much time should be given to translations, both 
oral and written, of easy English into French. From six hundred 
to eight hundred pages of graduated texts should be read. Where 
much attention has been given to oral work, the amount of read- 
ing may be diminished. 

Students offering German as an entrance requirement should 
be thoroughly familiar with the essentials of German Grammar; 
should be able to translate easy English into German; should 
be able to translate at sight easy German prose, and should be 
able to pronounce with a fair degree of accuracy. Candidates 
offering two years of German for admission to college are ex- 
pected to have read 200 pages of easy German ; those offering three 
years are expected to have read 400 pages besides reading at sight 
in class. 

SCIENTIFIC OR PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE 

1. The requirements for the Latin-Scientific course; or, 

2. (a) Mathematics, English, and History, the same as for the 
Classical course. 

(b) Latin or Greek. Four books of Caesar, or equivalent of 
Greek. 

(c) French or German. Three years' work in French or Ger- 
man, or two years' work in French or German and cither one 
year's work in History or Latin, or the Mathematics of the Fresh- 
man year. 

(d) Science. — Two years' work in the following subjects: 
Botany, Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, or Physics, 

< (a) English and History, the same ;is tor the Classical 

course. 

(h) Mathematics.— The entrance requirements for the Classi- 

cal course and the Mathematics oi the Freshman year, 

(c) French and German^— Two yean 1 work m both French 
ami German. The work required in each Language is hilly de- 
scribed under admission to Latin Scientific course. 

(d) Science. Two pears' work in the following lubiects: 
Botany, Physiology, Physical Geography, Chemistry, 01 Physics. 



Courses of Study 

The college offers four parallel courses of study, each covering 
four years: the Classical, the Latin-Scientific, the Scientific, and 
the Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are 
largely required; but, in the last two years, the work is mostly 
elective as shown under Order of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per 
week, are required in the Freshman year, and are elective, three 
hours each per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Clas- 
sical course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by additional 
studies in modern languages and science. 

Scientific Course. — Latin and Greek are not required, though 
they may be offered for admission, a large amount of time being 
given to studies in science, mathematics, and modern languages. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Law Electives. — Three hours per week of law may be elected 
in the junior year, and five hours per week in the senior year. By 
judicious election and a little extra work, students may save one 
year in their subsequent course in the School of Law. An extra 
charge is made when law is elected in place of college work. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in May 
and must have the approval of class deans. Change in electives 
may be made for good reason with the consent of class deans dur- 
ing the first three days of the college year, but later changes can 
be made only with consent of the Faculty. 

Extra Elective Studies. — Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of the 
Faculty, such additional work will not interfere with their reg- 
ular work. 

23 



24 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Special Students. — Students with uneven preparation may be 
admitted to the college upon showing, by examination or otherwise, 
that they are prepared for college work; but no such students 
will be admitted unless fully prepared in English, history, and one 
other subject of college preparation, nor with less than eleven 
units of college preparatory work, a unit of such work being a 
year's study of some preparatory subject, not less than four peri- 
ods per week. 

Graduate Work. — Graduate work is provided only for grad- 
uates of the college who are candidates for the Master's Degree. 
For further information, see Degrees. 



ORDER OF STUDIES 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Classical Course 

English, A 

Greek, B 

History, A 

Latin, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 



Philosophical Course 

English, A 

French, A or B 

German, A or D 

*Greek A 

History, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 



Latin-Scientific Course 

English, A 

French, , ) one of B 

German, } these D 

*Greek A 

History, A 

Latin, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 

Scientific Course 

English, A 

French, A or B 

German, A or D 

*Greek A 

History, A 

Mathematics, A or B 

Oratory. 



* Greek may be substituted for French, German or Latin, 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Classical Course 
Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Economics, A 

English, B 

Psychology, A 

Elective Studies (Elect nine 
hours) 

Chemistry, C 

German, A 

Greek, C 

Latin, B 

Mathematics, B 



Latin-Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English, B 

Psychology, A 

Elective Studies (Elect six 
hours) 

French, A or C 

German, A or E 

Greek, A 

Latin, B 

Mathematics, B 



25 



26 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORE CLASS, continued 

Philosophical Course Scientific Course 



Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English, B 

French, . ) one of ... .A or C 
German, ) these ... .A or E 

Psychology, A 

Elective Studies (Elect three 
hours) 

French A or C 

German, A or E 

Greek, A 

Mathematics, B 

Physics, C 



Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English, B 

Mathematics, B 

Physics, C 

Psychology, A 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Classical Course 
(Elect sixteen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, C, D or F 

Economics, D 

English Bible, A 

English, C 

Ethics, D 

French, A 

German, B 

Greek, D and E or A 

History, B and C 

Latin, C 

Law, A 

Mathematics 1) and G 

JMusics, C 

Psychology D 

Sociology, F 



Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, D or F 

Physics, F 

Elective Studies (Elect four 
hours) 

Economics, D 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

Ethics, D 

French B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History B and C 

Law A 

Mathematics I) and G 

Psychology D 

Sociology, F 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 



27 



JUNIOR CLASS, continued 



Latin-Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Physics, C 

Elective Studies (Elect thir- 
teen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, D or F 

Economics, D 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

Ethics, D 

French, B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History, B and C 

Latin, C 

Law, A 

Mathematics, D and G 

Psychology, D 

Sociology, F 



Philosophical Course 
(Elect sixteen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, D or F 

Economics, D 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

Ethics, D 

French, B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History, B and C 

Law, A 

Mathematics, D and G 

Physics, C 

Psychology, B 

Sociology, F 



SENIOR CLASS 



Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Phil- 
osophical Course 
(Elect sixteen hours) 

Astronomy, K 

Chemistry, I 

Economics, E 

Education,! F 

English, E and F 

French, B or C 

Geology, A 

German, C or F 

Greek, D and E or A 

Heredity, D 

History, D and E 

International Law, F 

Latin, D or E 

Law, B, C, or D 

Mathematics, D and G 

Philosophy, E 

Physics, F 

Sociology G 

Zoology, C 



Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Chemistry, I, J, K, or L 

Astronomy, K, or Geology, A 

Physics, C, H or I 

Zoology, C 

Elective Studies (Elect eight 
hours) 

Astronomy, K 

Economics, E 

Education, F 

English, E and F 

French, B or C 

Geology, A 

German, C or F 

Greek, A 

Heredity, D 

History, D and E 

International Law, F 

Law, B, C or D 

Mathematics, D and G 

Philosophy, E 

Sociology, G 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

BIBLE 

President Noble 

The course in English Bible is intended to make plain the place 
which the Bible has held in the life and literature of English- 
speaking peoples. This course presupposes some familiarity with 
the Bible as a whole, its peculiarities of composition, and varie- 
ties of literary form. Specific questions of textual criticism and 
dogmatics are not dwelt upon, as having little bearing upon the 
purpose of the course. The eminence and dominance of the Old 
and New Testaments among the books of the world is explained 
by constant reference to the best English literature and significant 
events in the history of English-speaking peoples, the purpose of 
the course being to win the minds of students to a serious and 
defensible interest in the Book of Books. It is regarded as a 
mistake in correct educational practice to fail to consider the Bible 
as a useful interpreter of the best aspects of English and Ameri- 
can life and thought, and this course is used for purposes of in- 
terpretation. 

The question of the Canon of Scripture is frankly considered 
in connection with the composition of the Old and New Testa- 
ments; this is followed by a discussion of the various versions of 
Scripture. The four chief translations into the English language 
are then reviewed with some care and attention, particularly as 
related to contemporaneous literature and social movements of 
the time when the translations were made. Discussions of such 
questions as revelation, inspiration, infallibility, and trustworth- 
iness are considered frankly and seriously, but from the point of 
view of literary criticism and not from the point of view of dog- 
matics. Besides the use of a required text-book, lectures and in- 
dependent reading constitute the course. 

TWO hours per week. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Stephens 

A. Gbnbral Biology. To meet tin- needs of the mend 
student. The course in Genera] Biology, required of all S<>ph<^ 

mores, consists of OfM l)"iir reeitation and one period of two hours 
lal>orator\ WOrk pel WtA tor a halt-year. 

B. Botany, During the fall and winter terms the work is 

Itrgelj plant morphology. During the spring term some time 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 

is devoted to field work, the emphasis being put upon the study of 
plants from the ecological standpoint. Open to Juniors, and con- 
sists of one hour recitation and two periods of laboratory work per 
week. 

C. Zoology. The aim is to present a course giving a com- 
prehensive view of the animal kingdom and serving as a basis for 
further study. Open to Seniors, and consists of one hour recita- 
tion and one period of laboratory work per week. 

D. Heredity. The purpose of this course is to give the 
student the cumulative discoveries of the past decade in this line 
of research, and to consider with candor the bearing of these dis- 
coveries upon the conservation of the race. Elective to Seniors, 
one hour per week. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Shadinger 

The chemical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the east 
wing of the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. The main labora- 
tory contains desks for ninety-two students. The smaller labora- 
tory for advanced work accommodates twenty-four. Each student 
is furnished with a desk and apparatus necessary for the per- 
formance of the experiments under the supervision and instruction 
of the professor. 

A. Lecture Course. Instruction in general Inorganic 
Chemistry is given to all students in the sophomore year (except 
those of the classical course electing Chemistry or Physics in the 
junior year). The aim of this course is to cover the fundamental 
principles of the science in connection with the descriptive chem- 
istry of the non-metallic elements. The elements of Theoretical 
Chemistry are taught and the students given practice in stoichio- 
metrical and other chemical problems. Two hours per week. 

B. Laboratory Course. The laboratory work of the first 
year consists of the performance by each student of a series of ex- 
periments, illustrating the important general principles and facts 
of the science, the properties of the more important non-metallic 
elements, and the laws of chemical action. The details of manipu- 
lation of these experiments are given, but with a view to cultivat- 
ing the powers of observation. The student is required to observe 
carefully and describe clearly the results of each experiment. Two 
hours (counting as one) per week. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Lecture Course. An elective course devoted to the 
principles of theoretical and physical chemistry, such as the kinetic- 
molecular hypothesis, theory of solution, atomic hypothesis, chem- 
ical equilibrium, theory of dissociation in solution, electrolysis, 
and the laws of mass action. This is followed by a study of the 
metallic elements based upon the periodic system. Prerequisite; 
Course A. Two hours per week. 

E. Laboratory Course. Qualitative Analysis. To accom- 
pany Course D. The usual course of preliminary work and analy- 
sis of simple and complex substances is pursued. The ionic theory 
and laws of mass action are applied to this work. Six hours 
(counting as three) per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. Lecture Course. Organic Chemistry. An elective 
course devoted to the principal classes of organic compounds, ali- 
phatic and aromatic, with emphasis upon class reaction and the 
structural theory. Prerequisite ; courses A and B, and preferably 
D and E. Two hours per week. 

H. Laboratory Course. A course in Organic Preparations 
to accompany lecture course G. Laboratory work in the prepara- 
tion and purification of compounds selected from the aliphatic and 
aromatic series for the illustration of important synthetic reac- 
tions; verification of the constants of these compounds; methods 
of organic analysis. Four hours (counting as two) per week. 

I. Courses G and H combined. 



J, K, and 

Laboratory Coursb. A course in Quantitative Analysis in 

its several branches. The work comprises a series of experiments 

which illustrate the fundamental principles of gravimetric and 

volumetric methods. The ionise is flexible, and great latitude 

will he allowed students manifesting interest and ability. Pre- 
requisite ; courses A, B, C, and 1). 

[. Four hours to count as two« 

K. Eight hours to i ount as foui . 

L Twelve hours to < ount as six. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Blakey 

In its course of instruction, the chief aim of the department of 
Economics and Sociology is to give a general view of the most im- 
portant subject matter in the economic and sociological sciences, 
beginning with the elements of the science and passing by degrees 
to courses of an investigative order. In addition to this broad 
general outline the courses and the methods of study are arranged 
to give some specialized preparation to students looking forward 
to business careers. 

A. Elements of Economics. 

This course will give the student a general survey of the fields 
of theoretical and practical economics. The first part deals with 
the principles of production, distribution, exchange and consump- 
tion of wealth; the second part, with the present organization of 
industry and the economic and social problems arising from the 
relations of employers and employees. Among the problems con- 
sidered are the labor problem, including the history and policies 
of trade unions, injunctions, arbitration, co-operation, profit-shar- 
ing, child labor, factory legislation, workingmen's insurance, and 
socialism. Taussig's Principles of Economics will be used as a 
text. 

Required of all Sophomores. Three hours per week. 

B. Modern Industrial History of Europe. 

After a brief survey of the economic conditions in the Euro- 
pean countries at the close of the Middle Ages, the course deals 
with the commercial and industrial development of the chief 
European countries since the middle of the eighteenth century, 
with special attention to Great Britain. 

Lectures, supplemented by prescribed topical readings. Open 
to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours per week. First half-year. 

C. Economic Development of the United States. 

A brief survey of the economic life of the colonists will be fol- 
lowed by a study of the factory system, public land policy, trans- 
portation facilities, and shipping before the Civil War; export 
trade, scientific agriculture, and railway extension after the War ; 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

recent development of large scale production, industrial combina- 
tions, and labor problems. 

Lectures, supplemented by prescribed topical readings. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours per week, second 
half-year. 

D. Courses B and C combined. 

E. Industrial Organization and Business Manage- 
ment. 

This course will include an examination of the human and 
physical factors in the organization and processes of industry ; the 
internal economies of organization due to the division of labor, 
etc. ; external economies of organization due to the concentration 
and integration of businesses; and the influences of the modern 
means of intercommunication on businesses. Special emphasis will 
be given to the growing size and complexity of modern business 
structure and to the managerial, financial, and political questions 
arising from business concentration, and the programs proposed 
for their solution will be analyzed. 

Attention is given to the general nature and the different types 
of business management, and to the functions of the entrepreneur. 
The various problems involved in the philosophy, demands, and 
applicability of scientific management will be examined. The 
course closes with an analysis of the growing spirit of co-operation 
in business management, the growing interest in the problems of 
vocational guidance, and the tendency to interpret industry in 
terms of human worth. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. Open to Sen- 
iors. Three hours per week. 

F. Principles of Sociology. 

Beginning with i itudj of the biological and psychological bases 

of human lOCtety, tin's COUrse traces its evolution under the oper- 
ation of the various Forces physical environment, growth and 

migration of populations, lOCial institutions, CtC ind anah/es 

•ocial phenomeni with the view of arriving it certain laws of 

•OCtal p rogr ess and noting their hearing upon present social prob- 
lems. 

Chapin'i Introduction to the Study of Social Evolution will he 

used SS I text. ( );wn to Juniors and Seniois. Three hours per 

week* 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

G. Social and Economic Problems. 

The work of this course will consist largely of practical inves- 
tigations, by individual members of the class, of some selected 
problem in economics or sociology, to be assigned by the instruc- 
tor and pursued under his direction. A paper will be prepared on 
the assigned topic, the results presented before the class for crit- 
icism and discussion. The course will open with an introduction 
to the principles, theory, and practice in the statistical method. 
Open to Seniors completing Economics E or Sociology F. Three 
hours per week. 

ENGLISH 
Professors Mclntire and Sellers 

A. Rhetoric and Composition, based upon English Composi- 
tion in Theory and Practice, by Canby and others. Required of 
all Freshmen, four hours per week. Professor Sellers. 

B. An introduction to the history of English literature with 
illustrative readings in class and in private reading courses. The 
text-book is supplemented by lectures and comments. Carpenter's 
edition of Stopford Brooke's English Literature. Newcomer and 
Andrews' Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose. Re- 
quired of all Sophomores, three hours per week. Professor Mc- 
lntire. 

C. Development of the English language. Offered in alter- 
nate years; not offered in 1914-15. Elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors, three hours per week. Professor Sellers. 

D. Literary Criticism. Winchester's Principles of Literary 
Criticism is used as a text-book and Newcomer and Andrews 1 
Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose as supplementary 
reading and application. Elective to Juniors who have taken Eng- 
lish B, two hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

E. American Literature. Page's The Chief American Poets 
is used as a text-book, and is supplemented by Pancoast's Intro- 
duction to American Literature (Revised) and a private reading 
course. Elective to students who have taken English D, two hours 
per week. Professor Mclntire. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

F. English Drama, consisting of lectures, readings, and re- 
ports. The readings are largely in the works of Shakespeare and 
his contemporaries. Elective with the permission of the instructor 
to a limited number of Seniors who have taken English D, two 
hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Cole 

The instruction in this department aims mainly at such a knowl- 
edge of the language as will enable the student to read the prose 
and poetry of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth cen- 
turies, without the necessity of translating, and with understand- 
ing and enjoyment. To this end, the "direct" method is employed, 
so far as conditions make it practicable, and French is progres- 
sively the language of the class-room. Throughout the course, 
persistent attention is given to pronunciation and sentence stress. 
There is a large amount of translation of easy sentences into 
French, and a still larger amount of question and answer in 
French on the texts read. Dictation exercises are frequent. 
Translation into English, at first full and frequent, aims primar- 
ily at making the meaning clear from the French point of view, 
and gradually gives place to question and answer in French, and 
to translation only of the difficulties and of new words and idioms. 

In Course A, the reading is largely nineteenth century prose. 
Some account is given of the authors read and of their place in the 
history of the literature. The reading in Course B is mainly from 
representative prose writers of the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies; but a considerable number of French lyrics are also read. 
Course C deals mainly, in class, with the great writers of the 
seventeenth century, with outside reading of modern authors. 
Courses B and C are intended to give a somewhat connected gen- 
eral view of the history of the literature during the seventeenth, 
eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 

A. Beginners' Course. Pronunciation. French Grammar. 
Conversation, Dictation. Practice in translating into English. 
Practice in writing French. This course is conducted partly in 
French. Three or four hours per week. 

B. Continues Course A. A considerable amount of outside 
reading is required. The work is conducted mainly in French. 
Four hours per week. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

C. Continues Course B. A large amount of outside reading 
is required. The work is conducted in French. Three hours per 
week. 

D. Is intended to give further practice in understanding 
spoken French, and in French conversation. The work is con- 
ducted in French. It is open to those who, in the judgment of 
the teacher, have had sufficient training in French to profit by 
the work. Two hours per week, counting as one. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Stephens 

A. Geology. An introduction to the science of Geology, both 
for students who are planning further scientific pursuits, and also 
for the larger class who wish merely to obtain an outline of the 
methods and principal results of the subject. Open to Seniors, 
two hours per week. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Prettyman 

A. Beginners' Course. German Grammar. German Prose. 
Practice in writing German. The work in this course is conducted 
in German according to the direct method. 

Three hours per week. 

B. A continuation of Course A, and is open only to students 
who have completed that course. The method is the same, the 
work being conducted in German. Three hours per week. 

C. A continuation of B, and is open only to students who have 
completed that course. Three hours per week. 

D. German Prose and Poetry. Grammar and practice in 
writing German. Required of Freshmen who offer two years 
of German for admission to college. Four hours per week. 

E. German Drama. In this course the student is made ac- 
quainted with the most famous German dramatists and their 
works. It is intended for those who have completed Course D. 
Three hours per week. 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

F. History of German Literature. Lectures. Reading of 
representative works. This course is open to students who have 
completed D and E; and may be elected a second year, as the 
works read are not the same in successive years. Three hours per 
week. 

GREEK 
Professor Morgan 

A. Beginners' Course. Grammar and composition. Anabasis. 
The language training of the college student is relied upon for 
speedy preparation to read easy Greek. Open to such students as 
have not before taken Greek. Four hours per week, to count as 
four hours for Freshmen and three hours for others. 

B. Freshmen Greek. Various Attic authors are read, but 
special emphasis is laid upon forms and syntax to the end that the 
student may be ready for somewhat rapid reading in subsequent 
years. Required of classical Freshmen four hours per week. 

C. Sophomore Greek. Plato, the orators, and Greek trag- 
edy furnish the texts for the course, which also gives much atten- 
tion to Greek literature. Three hours per week. 

D. One course in classical Greek is offered to Seniors and 
Juniors together. To avoid repetition of work by any student 
and to allow election for both the junior and senior years, the 
material of the course alternates from year to year. In 19 14-15 
the subject will be Homer and the Lyric Poets. Three hours per 
week. 

E. New Testament Greek. In the junior and senior years 
New Testament Greek may be elected. During these two years 
it is possible to read a large part of the Greek New Testament. 
A careful study is made of the vocabulary with the view of making 
it easy for the student to read at sight. Two hours per week. 

HISTORY 

Professor Prince 

A. Political and Constitutional History of England. 
From the earliest times to the close of the Napoleonic wars. Re- 
quired of Freshmen, two hours per week 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

B. American History. — From 1750 to the close of Recon- 
struction. Open to Juniors. Three hours per week. 

C. Civilization in Europe. — A philosophic study of the his- 
tory of Western Europe from the Fall of the Roman Empire to 
the close of the French Revolution. — Open to Juniors. Two 
hours per week. 

*D. Spain and the Spanish-American Colonies. — An an- 
alysis of the parallel processes of national expansion and decay 
from the accession of Charles I to the end of the reign of Charles 
III, supplemented by a survey of Spanish colonial development. 
Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

*E. Europe from the Congress of Vienna. — The theme 
of this course is the struggle between monarchy and democracy 
as the central fact in the political history of Europe in the Nine- 
teenth Century. Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

F. International Law. — The historical development of the 
comity of states and the nature and growth of the rules which 
govern their intercourse. Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

LATIN 
Professor Filler 

A. Freshman Latin. Selections from Sallust, Livy, Cicero. 
Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed and emphasis laid upon 

the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is given to 
translation in the class-room, and to the writing of Latin Prose. 
Roman History is reviewed. 

The course is largely devoted to drill-work, and aims to prepare 
the student for the intelligent and sympathetic reading of Latin 
literature in subsequent courses. Open to Freshmen. Four hours 
per week. 

B. Sophomore Latin. Readings from the poets, chiefly Plautus, 
Terence, and Horace; an outline study of the History of Latin 
Literature with illustrative readings. 

In the first half-year Classical Mythology is rapidly reviewed 
with particular reference to its use in literature and art. 

In the second half-year the Manners and Customs of the Ro- 
mans are considered. Open to Sophomores. Three hours per 
week. 



*D and E are given in alternating years. E given 1913-14. 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

For those who have completed A and B one or two of the fol- 
lowing courses will be given each year, according to the needs and 
desires of those electing advanced work. 

In Courses C and D attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 

C. Vergil, Works, Life, and Literary Influence, with readings 
from the Eclogues and ^Eneid, VII-XII, three hours per week. 
First half-year. 

Horace, Satires and Epistles, three hours per week. Second 
half-year. 

D. Cicero, Letters and Orations, with particular reference to 
his political career and the public life of the times. Three hours 
per week. First half-year. 

Lyric Poetry, particularly the poems of Catullus. Three hours 
per week. Second half-year. 

E. Tacitus and the other prose writers of the Silver Age. His- 
tory and description of the Roman Government. Three hours 
per week. 

F. Selections from the Elegiac Writers of the Augustan Age 
and the chief poets of the Silver Age. More extended study 
of the History of Latin Literature. Three hours per week. 

LAW 
Dean Trickett 

A. Criminal Law, first two terms; Bailments, the third term. 
Open to members of the Junior class. Three hours per week. 

B. Real Property. Three hours per week. 

C. Contracts. Two hours per week. 

D. Courses B and C combined. Open to Seniors. Five hours 
per week. 

E. Torts, first two terms; Domestic Relations, the third term. 
Three hours per week. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

MATHEMATICS 
Professor Landis and Adjunct Professor Craver 

A. Algebra, including Theory of Equations, Determinants, 
the Binomial Theorem, Choice, Logarithms, Interest and Annui- 
ties, etc. (Wentworth). Solid Geometry (Durell). Trig- 
onometry (Crockett). Four hours per week. 

B. Analytic Geometry. The conies and a discussion of the 
general equation of the second degree. (Fine and Thompson). 
Calculus. Differentiation, integration, maxima and minima, curve 
tracing, areas, lengths, volumes, centers of mass, etc. (Hulburt). 
Three hours per week. 

C. Calculus. Partial derivatives, curve tracing, evolutes, en- 
velopes. Taylor's Theorem, special methods of integration, etc. 
(Hulburt). Three hours per week, half-year. 

D. Differential Equations (Murray). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

E. Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions. The quadric 
surfaces and their more important properties, the general equation 
of the second degree, surfaces in general, and curves in space. 
(C. Smith.) Three hours per week, half-year. 

F. Projective Geometry (Cremona). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

G. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Computation of annui- 
ties, net premiums, loading, etc. (Moir). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

H. Spherical Astronomy. Problems in latitude, longitude, 
time, etc. (Chauvenet and the American Ephemeris). Three 
hours per week, half-year. 

I. History and Teaching of Mathematics. A reading course 
in the works of Cantor, Ball, Cajori, Zeuthen, Klein, Smith, 
Young, Schultze, etc. Three hours a week, half-year. 

Courses in the Theory of Numbers, Theory of Functions, Cal- 
culus of Probabilities, and other subjects have been given, and 
will be given whenever it seems desirable. Courses A and B are 



40 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

given each year. Of the remaining courses two are given each 
year, so that every student may follow at least four of them, and 
the student who presents course A for entrance may pursue six 
of them. 

K. Astronomy. An Introduction to Astronomy (Moulton). 
Two hours per week. 

ORATORY 

Mrs. L. J. McAnney 

The object of the course in Oratory in the freshman year is a 
practical and scientific treatment of the art of Public Speaking 
and the vocal interpretation of the masterpieces of oratory. The 
methods employed are not technical but practical and aim to de- 
velop the student's power toward the effective delivery of his 
own productions rather than that of elocutionary recital. No 
text book is used but lecture-talks are given by the instructor, the 
student taking notes on which he is examined. During the year, 
each student must deliver three declamations from the platform, 
which are subjected to the criticism of the class as well as the 
instructor. Much attention is given to extemporaneous work, 
and ample opportunity is afforded the student in public contests 
to demonstrate his ability to apply the principles taught him. 

PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 
Professor Gooding 

A. Psychology. A brief study of cerebral physiology, sensa- 
tion, and association. Two hours per week, half-year. 

B. Psychology. A continuation and completion of Course A. 
No apparatus is used, but the subject matter is placed in the form 
of problems to be solved out of the direct experience of the pupil. 
Three hours per week, first half-year. 

C. Ethics. A study of fundamentals. The types of ethical 
theories are critically studied, and an attempt made to determine 
a standard of right. Three hours per week, second half-year. 

D. Courses B and C combined. Three hours per week. 

E. Philosophy. The Introduction to Philosophy forms the 
work of the first half-year, and the History of Philosophy the 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

second half. The texts used are Paulsen's "Introduction to Phil- 
osophy," Descartes' "Meditations," Berkeley's "Principles," and 
Hume's "Enquiry." Three hours per week. 

F. Education. Methods of teaching elementary and sec- 
onday school subjects. Observation of Schools, Psychological 
Principles, and History of Education. Three hours per week. 

The Educational Code of Pennsylvania requires of college 
graduates applying for a provisional certificate two hundred edu- 
cational hours. These hours can be absolved by Courses A, D, 
and F. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Director Craver 

The course in physical training is planned as a two year course. 
One hundred and twenty hours of work are required of all male 
students of the college, by the department during their first two 
years in college. 

During the early months of his connection with the college 
each student is subjected to a careful physical examination by the 
director. All physical defects are noted and corrective exercises 
suggested. 

The courses in physical training are as follows: 

I. Out door work — walking, running, jumping, etc., non-com- 
petitive. 

II. Out door work — competitive sports — football, baseball, 
track, tennis. 

III. Indoor work, calisthenics. 

IV. Indoor work — competitive games — basket ball, track ath- 
letics, gymnasium team. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Mohler 

A. Mechanics, Sound, Light and Electricity. Two demon- 
stration lectures or recitations per week. Text — Kimball's Col- 
lege Physics. 

B. A laboratory course to accompany Physics A. Exact meas- 
urements in Mechanics, Sound and Light. One period of two 
hours per week. 



42 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

C. Courses A and B combined. Three hours per week. 

D. Electricity, Light, and Heat. Text — Franklin and Mc- 
Nutt. Three demonstration lectures or recitations per week. 

E. A laboratory course on Light, Heat, Electricity, and Pho- 
tography. One period of two hours per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. An advanced course in electrical measurement. Text — 
Franklin Crawford and McNutt. One period of two hours per 
week. 

Advanced laboratory work in Optics and Heat. Text — Mann's 
Advanced Optics. Courses as follows. 

H. Two hours per week, counting as one. 

I. Four hours per week, counting as two. 






Material Equipment 



Grounds and Buildings. — The campus includes a full square 
of the borough of Carlisle, purchased of the Penns by the Cor- 
poration. Upon it are grouped most of the buildings of the col- 
lege proper. In addition, the college owns the Law School build- 
ing, Conway Hall, Denny Hall, South College, and Lloyd Hall; 
also a fine and well-equipped athletic field. The buildings are 
heated from a central steam plant and lighted by electricity. 

West College (1804), built of native limestone and trimmed 
with red sandstone, is 150 by 54 feet, and contains commodious 
accommodations for the Young Men's Christian Association, and 
dormitories for sixty-five students. 

East College (1836), also of native limestone, 130 by 42 feet 
and four stories high, is used solely for dormitory purposes, and 
will accommodate one hundred and ten students. 

The Jacob Tome Scientific Building (1884), the gift of 
the late Jacob Tome, of Port Deposit, Md., is of native limestone, 
trimmed with Ohio sandstone and is 184 feet long by 56 feet 
wide. The west wing contains complete provisions for a college 
department of physics, including lecture-room, office of professor, 
private laboratory, large laboratory for general use, three small 
laboratories, a workshop, and minor apparatus rooms. The east 
wing contains similar ample provision for the chemical depart- 
ment, and the center is occupied by a large and handsome museum 
hall adapted to the preservation and display of the collections of 
the college. 

The James W. Bosler Memorial Library Hall (1885) is an 
admirable structure in architectural design, as well as in material 
and construction. It was the gift to the college by the widow of 
him whose name it bears, and in whose honor it was conceived 
and built, the cost of the furnished building being about $75,000. 
It supplies library accommodations, substantially fire-proof, and an 
audience hall seating eight hundred persons. In this building the 
valuable library has not only complete protection, but also the re- 
quisites for convenient use and proper display, with room for 
growth. 

The Denny Memorial Building, occupying the site of the 
first Denny Building destroyed March 3, 1904, was completed 
and dedicated June 6, 1905. The first story is of Hummelstown 
brownstone with the second and third stories of dark, iron-clay, 

43 



44 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

pressed brick. The building is distinctively memorial in character. 
In it are eleven large recitation-rooms, each with an office adjoin- 
ing, and, in addition, three large halls, for the use of the literary 
societies of the college, two of which date back; more than one 
hundred vears. The various rooms are designated as follows: 
Kessler-McFadden Hall, Smith Hall, Carroll Hall, Stephen Greene 
Hall, Harman Hall, Reed Hall, Patton Hall, Lindner Hall, 
Durbin Hall, Lawton Hall, Trickett Hall, Hoyt-Haight Hall, 
Prettyman Hall, McCrea-Earp Hall, Crider Hall, Crawford 
Hall, and Pierce Hall, each with an appropriate inscription tablet 
recording the name of the person in whose honor the Hall is 
named, together with that of the one establishing the memorial. 
The building contains also the lecture-room, laboratories, and col- 
lections of the biological department of the college. The labora- 
tories are large, well lighted, and thoroughly equipped with ap- 
paratus for the work of the department. 

The Gymnasium furnishes accommodations for physical train- 
ing. The main hall, 75 feet in length by 40 feet in width, is flank- 
ed on the eastern and western extremities by wings, of which 
the one, in dimensions 84 by 20 feet, contains the baseball cage, 
while the other, 60 by 20 feet, is used for offices, bathing- and 
dressing-rooms. It is provided with a running gallery, having a 
track of 235 feet in length, bathrooms, dressing-rooms, and offices, 
completely fitted up and furnished with proper appliances. 

Metzger College. — As announced some months since, a new 
location has been secured as a residence hall for women students. 

The Metzger College property has been generously put at the 
disposal of Dickinson College, to be used for the women students 
of the college. This property is located on North Hanover street, 
and contains about three acres of ground, upon which is erected 
a spacious brick building, three stories in height, with large rooms, 
well ventilated, heated, lighted, and furnished. It has been oc- 
cupied heretofore as a school for girls, and by some alterations has 
been made a thoroughly satisfactory home for college students. 

The building provides accommodations for fifty students. It 
is in charge of a capable woman who makes their home life both 
pleasant and profitable. By action of the Board of Trustees of 
the college only a limited number of ladies may be matriculated, 
but those who are received here probably have conveniences at 
Metzger College not excelled in any other college of the State. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Athletic Field \\ ;is 
the gift of the Hon. and Mrs. Edward W. Biddle, of Carlisle, 
in memory of their lamented son, Herman Bosler Biddle, class of 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 45 

1903, and is a tract of land of more than six acres, located on the 
Chambersburg turnpike (Main street extension), easily accessible 
from the college, and admirably adapted to the purposes for which 
it has been prepared. The field is entered at the northeastern 
corner through an artistically designed gateway. On the western 
side is a splendid grand-stand, which will accommodate nine 
hundred and fifty spectators. In front of the grand-stand stretches 
the straightaway track, 20 feet in width, forming a section of the 
quarter-mile track, every part of which is in full view of the 
stand. Within the ellipse formed by the track is located the dia- 
mond and gridiron required for baseball and football. On the 
eastern side are five model tennis-courts. The field was dedicated 
with impressive ceremonies, June 8, 1909, and is one of the most 
beautiful athletic fields in the country. 

Todd Hospital, the gift of Mrs. Sarah A. Todd, is located in 
Carlisle, and is available for the use of students at any time. 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

The Library, available to all students, under established regula- 
tions, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — 
that of the college proper, which is exceedingly rich in old vol- 
umes and in reference books in certain departments — and those 
of the Belles Letters and Union Philosophical Societies, accumu- 
lated by them during the century and more of their existence. 
These three libraries are one in organization, not only by reason 
of their arrangement, but by the registration of the books of all 
in a single catalogue, on the card plan, which renders books in any 
of the collections easy of reference. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, of 
Curwensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of establishing 
a Library Fund, together with the cordial co-operation of the 
Alumni Library Guild Association, the college is now able to 
make substantial additions, annually, to the resources of the Li- 
brary. 

The reading-room in the Library is furnished with the best of 
reading-room appliances. Its files are supplied with representa- 
tives of the best secular and religious papers, while many of the 
best American and foreign magazines are upon its tables. Stu- 
dents are thus enabled to keep familiar with the daily news, and 
also to become acquainted with the best current literature of the 
world. 



General Regulations 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examination of candidates for admission will take place on 
Tuesday of Commencement week, and on the day before the 
opening of the Fall term. 

Examinations will take place at the close of the Fall, Winter, 
and Spring terms, at mid-year, or by special action of the Faculty, 
upon the completion of an integral part of any subject. 

DEGREES 

The following degrees in cursu will be conferred by the col- 
lege on members of classes having entered college prior to 191 2. 

Bachelor of Arts. — The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be con- 
ferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Classi- 
cal course. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. — The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
will be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work 
of the Latin-Scientific and Philosophical courses. 

Bachelor of Science. — The degree of Bachelor of Science will 
be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the 
Scientific course. 

On students of classes having entered the college in September, 
1912, or later, the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred on 
their completion of the Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Philosophical 
courses; and the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
on such students on their completion of the Scientific course. 

Master of Arts. — The degree of Master of Arts in cursu will 
be conferred on those graduates of the college who shall have 
completed a course of study prescribed by the professors in the 
several departments and approved by the Faculty, and who shall 
have passed a satisfactory examination thereon at the seat of the 
college not later than May 15 of any year. Examinations will 
be conducted in May of each year by the several professors under 
whose direction the studies shall have been pursued. A charge 
of twenty dollars will be made for the examination, one-half of 
which shall be payable when the student registers, which must 
be by October 15. Graduates of reputable colleges who shall 
complete in a satisfactory manner the course of the School of Law 
are eligible for the degree of Master of Arts, in cursu. All recipi- 

46 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 47 

ents of the degree will be charged the usual diploma fee of five 
dollars. Application for information respecting the Master's 
degree must be made in writing to Dr. B. O. Mclntire, Chairman 
of Committee on Graduate Work. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Devotional services are held in the James W. Bosler Memorial 
Library Hall every morning, and all students are required to be 
present. Students are also required to attend the regular morning 
preaching services of the churches they elect. 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

The government and discipline of the college are vested exclu- 
sively in the Faculty of the college, although the regulation of cer- 
tain functions which have particular reference to the life of the 
student-body is left largely to the determination of the students 
themselves. A copy of the Rules and Regulations, established by 
the Trustees for the government of the college and the ordering of 
her work, is placed in the hands of each student upon matricula- 
tion, and he or she is expected to conform to the rules and regu- 
lations to which they subscribe. 

Conduct inconsistent with the general good order of the insti- 
tution may result in suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. Any 
student found guilty of dishonesty in an examination or written 
recitation will be suspended for a period of not less than four 
weeks. Suspended students are required to go to their homes, 
and parents or guardians are notified of the facts. 

Report of attention to college duties and of the deportment of 
each student is made at the close of each term to students per- 
sonally, if of legal years; otherwise to parents or guardians. Spe- 
cial reports will be sent out whenever deemed necessary by the 
Faculty. 

COLLEGE BILLS 

General charge to students, $125 00 

Room-rent, $8 to 35 00 

Laboratory — Botanical, Chemical, Physical Anatomical, 

or Zoological, each, 12 50 

Laboratory — Biological, 5 00 

Athletic charge, unanimously recommended by students, . . 8 00 
Charge for The Die kins onian, unanimously recommended 

by students, I 00 

Students presenting scholarships will be credited on general 
charges for their face value. 



48 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

METZGER COLLEGE 

For ladies residing in Metzger College the total charge is $375 
per year, payable in three installments within ten days of the 
opening of each term, or within ten days of their arrival. This 
sum will cover all expenses for furnished rooms, bed-furnishing, 
lights, steam-heating, board; everything, indeed, save personal 
laundry, books, and laboratory charges. All ladies non-residents 
of the town are expected to room in Metzger College. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS, REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

When two students from the same family are present in the 
college at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent, is made. 

Students who, at their own request, room alone, are charged 
the full rent of the room. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent them- 
selves from college work for the whole or major portion of any 
term, and who present themselves for examination in said work, 
will be charged one-half of the regular rate for the period of their 
absence from college work. 

During the college year two bills are presented, one for the 
Fall term and the other covering the charges for the Winter and 
Spring terms combined. It should be observed that the Fall 
term bill is for two-fifths of the academic year, and the com- 
bined Winter and Spring term bill is for the remaining three-fifths. 
This latter may be paid in two installments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days fol- 
lowing the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once and 
will be required by the noon of October 15 following. 

The combined Winter and Spring term bill will be presented 
within ten days following the opening of the Winter term. Pay- 
ments is expected at once and will be required by the noon of 
January 25. If paid in two installments, the one for the Winter 
term and the other for the Spring term, payments must be made 
by January 25 and by April 15, respectively. 

Extension of time will not be granted for the payment of bills, 
unless written application on forms to be provided by the treasurer 
is made before the dates set for their payment. Failure to at- 
tend to this matter will render a student liable to exclusion from 
recitations or from college. No reduction on any term bill will be 
allowed for less than four iveeks of continuous absence, for any 
cause, during any part of any term. For a period of continuous 
absence in excess of four weeks, a reduction of one-half the pro 
rata, or ivcckly, charge will be alloived, provided the absence oc- 
curs through no fault of the student. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 49 

N. B. — Beginning with the academic year 1912-13, every stu- 
dent connected with the college, and every student proposing en- 
trance, will be required to show a receipt signed by the treasurer 
of the college for the sum of ten dollars before being admitted to 
the work of the class with which he is associated, the said sum to 
appear as a credit on the college bill for the Fall term. The same 
rule wil be observed at the opening of the Winter term. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, or 
money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

The rooms in the college are secured to the students during term 
time only. 

Damage. — The occupants of each room are held accountable 
for any damage to the room, and the cost must be paid promptly 
on presentation of bill. Any student proved to be guilty of wilful 
destruction of, or damage to, college property, may be required to 
pay not only the cost of replacement, or repair, but also a fine as 
determined by the Faculty (not to exceed ten times the cost of 
repair), said fine to be placed to the credit side of the special dam- 
age account. When the students injuring property are unknown, 
the cost of repairs is assessed, toward the close of the college year, 
upon the whole body of students, as a special damage account. 

No student can have honorable dismissal, or certificate of pro- 
gress in his studies, until his bills have been duly adjusted. 

GOWNS, HOODS, AND CAPS 

The college has adopted the regulations for academic caps and 
gowns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 1895. 

1. Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black- 
stuff gown of the Oxford shape, but with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occa- 
sions a black-stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood lined with 
red silk, crossed by a chevron of white, six inches in breadth. 

3. Masters of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting oc- 
casions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for 
Bachelors. 

4. Doctors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting oc- 
casions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for 
Bachelors, trimmed around the exterior edge with a cord or with 
a band, not more than four inches wide, of silk, satin, or velvet, 
distinctive of the department to which the degree pertains, as fol- 
lows: Doctor of Literature, white; Doctor of Divinity, scarlet; 
Doctor of Laws, purple; Doctor of Philosophy, blue; Doctor of 
Science, gold-yellow. 



50 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

With the gown will be worn the Oxford cap, of serge for under- 
graduates and of broadcloth for graduates, with black tassels, ex- 
cept the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of velvet with 
tassels in whole or part of gold thread. 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, during 
their term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the doctor's de- 
gree, with the hood appropriate to the degree that they severally 
have received. Members of the Board of Trustees, or of the Fac- 
ulty, who have received degrees from other universities or col- 
leges, shall be entitled to wear the costume appropriate to the 
same degree from Dickinson College, so long as they shall retain 
their official connection with the college. The President of the 
college may adopt such distinctive costume or badge as he shall 
choose, not inconsistent with the foregoing regulations. 



College Organizations 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The Belles Lettres and the Union Philosophical Societies, purely 
literary in their character, nearly coeval with the college, have 
been maintained in continuous operation throughout most of its 
history; and Harman Society, the organization of the young ladies, 
was founded in 1896. Not the least of the advantages of college 
residence is the special training secured in these societies. The 
halls in which they meet, ample in size and thoroughly equipped, 
are hardly surpassed anywhere. For nearly twenty years the work 
and worth of these societies have been recognized in the following 
regulations : 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical con- 
test in connection with the college who shall not have been a 
member of one of the literary societies for at least three-fourths of 
the time of his or her connection with the college. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of 
Commencement Day who shall not have been a member of one of 
the literary societies for at least one-half of the time of his or her 
connection with the college. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the college who shall 
not have made satisfactory adjustment of financial obligations to 
the literary society of which he or she has been a member. 

BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY 

Officers: President— Clinton DeWitt Van SiclEn, '14. 
Vice President — Everett E. Borton, '15 
Recording Secretary — John M. Stevens, '15 
Corresponding Secretary — Raymond S. Michael, '15 
Treasurer — Russell B. Dysart, '15 
Critic — Raymond E. Marshall, '14 
Clerk — George W. Bradley, 'i6 

Executive Committee: Elton M. McIntosh, '14; H. Cheston 
Hicks, '14; David M. Wallace, '15 

UNION PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Clyde M. Williams, '14. 
Vice-President — Thomas R. Jeffrey, 'i6. 
Recording Secretary— Robert B. Kistler, '15. 

51 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Corresponding Secretary — Harry L,. Price, '17. 
Treasurer — J. Freeman Melroy, '14 
Censor — Raymond E. Brewer, 'i6. 
Critic — Harry E. Brumbaugh, '14. 
Clerk— Chari.es H. Reitz, 'i6. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Walter A. Hearn, '14. 

Executive Committee: George C. Hering, '17 Wilson P. SpErow, 
'14; E. Harold Frantz, '14. 

HARMAN SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Ruth H. Bigham, '14 
Vice-President — Matilda S. Elliott, '14. 
Secretary— Mary E. CoylE, '14 
Treasurer — Marguerite English, '14 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

These Associations in the college are well organized, and do a 
most useful work. A large number of the students are actively 
connected with them and are zealous to forward their work. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Adam Nagay, '14 

Vice-President— Raymond E. Marshall, '14 
Corresponding Secretary — S. Russell Bryson, '14 
Recording Secretary — CarlylE R. Earp, '14. 
Treasurer — Alonzo S. Fite, '15 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Margaret M. Thompson, '14 
Vice-President — Mabel E. Krall, '14 
Secretary — Kathryn M. Hodgson, '15 
Treasurer— Helene Nelson, '15 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

The trustees, in 1891, ordered that the alumni be divided into 
four geographical districts, centering respectively in Baltimore, 
Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Carlisle, and that the alumni of 
each district elect a trustee, to be known as an Alumni Trustee, 
having all privileges of trustees of the college. These District 
Alumni Associations meet at such times as they may elect. There 
are also a General Alumni Association and various local associa- 
tions. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 53 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D. 
Vice President — J. Henry Baker, Esq. 
Secretary — Montgomery P. Sellers. 
Treasurer — George L. Reed, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

BALTIMORE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Hon. Hammond Urner.. 
First Vice-President — Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. 
Second Vice-President — Carl F. New 
Treasurer — James E. Carey, Esq. 
Recording Secretary — Rev. John R. Edwards. 
Corresponding Secretary — William H. Davenport. 
Executive Committee — Hon. George R. Willis; G. Lane Taney- 

hill, M.D. ; Rev. J. Fred Heisse, D.D. ; Harry L. Price, Esq.; 

Isaac T. Parks, Jr., Esq.; Rev. Martin L. Beall; J. Henry 

Baker, Esq.; Rev. W. D. Morgan; Rev. James C. Nicholson, 

D.D.; Rev. Andrew Wood. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — G. Lane Taneyhill, 

M.D. 
Address of Secretary, Garrett Building, South and German streets, 

Baltimore, Md. 

CARLISLE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Alexander H. Ege. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 

Representative in the Board of Trustees — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 

Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Henry C. Longnecker, D.D.S. 
Vice-President— George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Thomas S. Lanard, Esq. 
Executive Committee — Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq. ; Frysinger Evans, 

Esq.; Charles K. Zug, Esq.; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq.; Rev. 

Thomas W. Davis; William P. String. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — Charles J. Hepburn, 

Esq. 
Address of the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia, Pa, 



54 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Hym an N. Levy. 

Vice-President— John E. Taylor, Esq. 
Secretary— Frederick S. Stitt, Esq. 
Treasurer— James Strayer, Esq. 

WILMINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Rev. Elmer L. Cross, Ped.D. 
Vice-President — Hon. Thomas N. Rawlins. 
Executive Committee— Rev. Ralph T. Coursey; Henry P. Can- 
non. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees— Henry P. Cannon. 

DICKINSON CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY 

Officers: President— T. Leonard Hoover. 

Vice-President— Rippey T. Sadler, Esq. 

Secretary and Treasurer — J. Fred Laise. 

Executive Committee — L. Wellington Johnson, C. Grant Cleav- 
er, William K. Swartz, Thomas J. Towers, Esq.; Frank H. 
Hertzler. 

THE ALUMNI FUND COMMITEEE 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; Charles K. Zug, Esq., '8o; John M. 
Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. Boyer, Esq., '88; Charles J. Hepburn, 
Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; William A. Jordan, Esq., '97; 
Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. Burchenal, Esq., *oo; T. Leon- 
ard Hoover, '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., 'oo; George H. Bonner, Esq., 
'oi ; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02 ; Frank D. Lawrence, '02. 

Officers: Chairman — Henry P. Cannon, '70, Bridgeville, Del. 

Vice-Chairman— George D. Chenoweth, '68, Woodbury, N. J. 

Secretary — Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa, 

Treasurer— C. W. Prettyman, '91, Carlisle, Pa. 

Executive Committee — Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; 
Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; T. 
Leonard Hoover, '00; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Frank D. Law- 
rence, '02; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00, Secretary, 1242 Land 
Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

In September, 1886, the Alpha Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, the first in the State of Pennsylvania, was organized. 
Only students finally passed for graduation are eligible to mem- 
bership, and of these only those of high class standing or giving 
promise of unusual achievement. Graduates of former years, not 
below the first fourth of their classes, and men of eminence in pro- 
fessional life, are also eligible to membership. 

Officers: President — Henry F. Whiting. 
Vice-President — Mervin G. FieeER. 
Secretary — John F. Moheer. 
Treasursr— Forrest E. Craver. 

THE DICKINSON LIBRARY GUILD 

The Dickinson Library Guild, composed of alumni and friends 
of Dickinson College, is organized for the purpose of creating a 
permanent endowment for the College Library, and membership 
in the Guild consists of those who make an annual contribution 
to the endowment fund of the Library. The membership is of 
five classes, or groups, as follows: 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 
Class B, all who contribute from five to ten dollars per year. . 
Class C, all who contribute three dollars per year. 
Class D, all who contribute two dollars per year. 
Class E, all who contribute one dollar per year. 

In accordance with the action of the B&ard of Trustees of the 
college, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the perma- 
nent endowment fund of the Library, the proceeds of which shall 
be devoted to the sole purpose of purchasing books by the Faculty 
Committee on Library. The current expenses of the organization 
shall be otherwise provided for. 

Directors: President — Bradford O. McIntire. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 
John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; J. Kirk Boseer, Esq., '97; Eare S. John- 
ston, '13. 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 

For some years the students in their organized capacity have ex- 
ercised limited government over some of their own internal inter- 



56 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

ests. This student government has applied especially to relations 
of one class with another, but has also influenced the life of the 
entire student-body. 

The student organization is called the Student Assembly, and 
the elected governing body is called the Senate. 

Senate: Lester W. Auman, '14; Foster E. Brenneman, '14; J. 
Paul Brown, '14; Frank C. Bunting, '14; Allan B. Dai/ton, '16; 
John E. Martin, '17; Russell C. McEeeish, '14; Adam Nagay, '14; 
Emory B. Rockwell, '14; Wieson P. Sperow, '14; Charges E. Wag- 
ner, '14. 
Officers: President — Adam Nagay, '14. 

Vice-President — Emory B. Rockweee, '14. 

Secretary — Lester W. Auman, '14. 

Treasurer— J. Paue Brown, '14. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

In the autumn of 1908 several of the more musically inclined 
students set on foot a movement whch has resulted in the present 
College Band. Originally simply a means of helping on the sing- 
ing at the football games, it has outgrown its original purpose and 
is now one of the regular musical organizations of the college. It 
furnishes the music for college functions, and frequently gives 
concerts on the campus. Any student with musical ability is eligi- 
ble to membership. Instruction is provided for beginners, and 
students are encouraged to take up this sort of work. 

Officers: President— Walter A. Hearn, '14. 
Director — Ceinton H. Miller, '14. 
Vice-President— Charles E. Wagner, '14. 
Secretary— J. Ohrum Small, '15. 
Treasurer— George C. Dietz, '14. 
Librarian — J. Raymond Burke, 'i6. 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Francis A. Dunn, '14. 
Vice-President— C. W. Sharp, Law, '14. 
Secretary— D. Paul Rogers, '16. 
Treasurer— Fred L. Mohler, '14- 
Assistant Treasurer — David M. Wallace, '15. 
Advisory Committee — Forrest E. Craver, Carlisle; William W. 

Landis, Carlisle; Henry M. Stephens, Carlisle; Raphael S. 

Hays, Carlisle, term expires 1914; Edward M. Biddle, Esq., 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 57 

Carlisle, term expires 1915; Edward M. Biddee, Jr., Esq., Phila- 
delphia, term expires 191S; J. Kirk Boseer, Esq., Carlisle, term 
expires 1916; William D. Boyer, Esq., Scranton, term expires 
1916. 

Football Manager — Wieson P. SpErow, '14. 

Baseball Manager — Eeton M. McIntosh, '14. 

Manager Outdoor Sports — Russeee R. McWhinney, '15. 

Manager Indoor Sports — Cearence G. WarFieed, '15. 

Captain Football Team — Hyman Gk)EDSTEiN, Eaw, '15. 

Captain Baseball Team — Robert E. RoweEy, Law, '14. 

Captain Track Team — Waeter I. Mathis, '15. 

Captain Gymnasium Team — Harry A. Koeb, Eaw, '14. 



Prizes, Scholarships, and Beneficiary Funds 

PRIZES 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improve- 
ment in composition and declamation at an early stage in the col- 
lege course, the literary societies have each instituted a yearly 
contest therein for their respective members from the Sophomore 
class. All the members of this class in the Belles Lettres Society 
have the option of competing, and a gold medal is awarded the 
contestant exhibiting the highest degree of excellence in the arts 
to which the competition relates, as decided by judges chosen by the 
society. 

Not awarded 1913. 

The Cannon Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henry 
P. Cannon, of Bridgeville, Del., is awarded to that member of the 
Sophomore class who shall pass the most satisfactory examination 
in the Mathematics of the Sophomore year, together with the 
original Geometry of the Freshman year. 

Awarded to Lawson S. Laverty, Harrisburg, Pa. 

The Carlisle High School Scholarship Prize, of forty dol- 
lars, the gift of the college, is awarded to the student entering 
from the high school of Carlisle who has attained the highest 
rank in the work preparatory for college. 

The Chi Omega Fraternity Prize of twenty-five dollars, the 
gift of the Dickinson chapter, to be awarded to the young woman 
student who excels in Sophomore Economics. First offered for 
year 1913-14. 

The Clemens Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the 
Rev. Joseph Clemens, '94, Chaplain, United States Army, is 
awarded annually to the student of the Junior class, proposing the 
work of the ministry, who writes the best essay, or sermon, upon 
some subject bearing upon the work of foreign missions, the essay 
or sermon not to exceed fifteen hundred words, and to be presented 
to the President of the college not later than May I of each year. 
A copy of the Winning essay or sermon, in typewritten form, shall 
be forwarded to the donor of the prize. 

Awarded to Adam Nagay, West Pittston, Pa. 

58 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

The Dare Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the college, is 
awarded to that member of the graduating class of the Conway 
Hall Preparatory School who shall be found to have attained the 
highest excellence in the studies preparatory to any course of 
Dickinson College. 

Awarded to Nora May Mohler, Carlisle. 

The Charles Mortimer Giffin Prize in English Bible. — This 
prize, established in memory of the Rev. Charles Mortimer Giffin, 
D.D., is based upon a fund contributed by his wife, and per- 
manently invested, the income of which shall be used as an 
award for work done under suitable conditions in the study of 
The English Bible by a young man who may be a member of 
either the Junior or Senior class. One of the conditions govern- 
ing the award shall be the writing of a competitive essay, and that 
one being adjudged the best for comprehensiveness of survey, in- 
dependence of judgment, and excellence of style shall be given 
the prize. A typewritten copy of the prize-winning essay shall be 
furnished to the donor. 

First offered 19 1 3-1 4. 

The Jackson Scholarship Prizes, two in number, of fifty 
dollars each, established by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jackson, of Ber- 
wick, Pa., in memory of her husband, the late Col. Clarence Gear- 
hart Jackson, are awarded annually to students entering from 
Williamsport Dickinson Seminary who have attained the highest 
rank in scholarship, the scholarships to be good for the Freshman 
year only. 

The Johnson Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph H. 
Johnson, '05, of Milton, Pa., is awarded to that one of the liter- 
ary societies of the college whose members shall excel in debate, 
said debate to be conducted according to the terms proposed by 
the Faculty, and adopted by the respective societies. 

Awarded to the Belles Lettres Society, represented by B. Olcott 
McAnney, Carlisle; Adam Nagay, W. Pittston; Clarence Grif- 
fith Warfield, Rockville, Md. 

The King Scholarship Prize is awarded annually to the 
graduate of the high school, Washington, D. C, selected by the 
principal for excellence in the studies preparatory to entrance in 
Dickinson College, the scholarship to be enjoyed during the Fresh- 
man year only. 

Not awarded, 1913. 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The McDaniel Prizes. — Delaplaine McDaniel, Esq., late of 
Philadelphia, provided for the founding of certain scholarships, 
to be awarded on the ground of excellence in scholarship. The 
sum of five thousand dollars was given the college in trust, 
with provision that three prizes, equal in amount, be constituted 
from the annual income, and offered yearly to be competed for 
by the members of the Freshman and Sophomore classes, and with 
provision, further, that, two of these prizes be awarded, one each, 
to the two members of the former class, and the remaining prize to 
the member of the latter class who in such way as the authorities of 
the college prescribe, attain the highest average of excellence in 
the work of these classes respectively. 

Freshman class — First prize to Ethel M. Schellinger, Green 
Creek, N. J. Second, prize divided between Raymond R. Brewer, 
Sylvan, and Thomas R. Jeffrey, Pen Argyl. 

Sophomore class — Divided between David Cameron, 2nd, Har- 
risburg, and Ella M. Rothermel, Maiden Creek. 

The Miller Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles 
O. Miller, Esq., of Stamford, Conn., is awarded to that member 
of the Freshman class who shall excel in forensic declamation. 

Awarded to David Paul Rogers, Harrisburg. 

The Norristown (Pa.) High School Scholarship Prize of 

forty dollars, the gift of the college, will be awarded to that stu- 
dent from the high school of Norristown who, on entering, is 
recommended by the principal as having attained the highest rank 
in scholarship, the scholarship to be good for the Freshman year 
only. Not awarded in 19 13. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes, four in number, of 
twenty-five dollars each, one for each of the college classes, offered 
by the late Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a memorial to 
his father, Gen. John Patton, for many years a faithful friend and 
trustee of the college, are awarded according to conditions estab- 
lished for the Patton Scholarship Prizes maintained for many years 
by his honored father. 

Senior class — Awarded to Elda R. Park, La Park. 

Junior class — Awarded to Samuel L. Mohler, Carlisle. 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Hiester R. Hornbcrger, Sinking 
Spring. 

Freshman class — Awarded to Leonard G. Hagner. Wilmington, 
Del 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 61 

The Pierson Prizes for oratory, established by Daniel Pierson, 
Esq., of Newark, N. J., gold and silver medals, are offered each 
year to be competed for by members of the Junior class in a public 
oratorical contest, which contest has for years been placed among 
the exercises of Commencement week. 

Gold Medal— Raymond E. Marshall, Millburn, N. J. Silver 
Medal — Lester W. Auman, Mifflintown. 

The Rees Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the Rev. Milton 
S. Rees, D.D., Rochester, N. Y., is awarded to that student who 
shall excel in English Bible. 

Not awarded 191 3. 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize of fifty dol- 
lars, the gift of General James Fowler Rusling, LL.D., '54, 
Trenton, N. J., is awarded to that member of the Senior class who, 
at the end of a four years' course, shall be found to excel in schol- 
arship and character, as determined by the Faculty. 

Award to Mary Boyd Robinson, Shippensburg. 

The Smith Prize of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert Hays 
Smith, '98, of San Francisco, Cal., is awarded as a second prize, 
to be distributed equally among the members of the winning team 
in the annual Inter-society debate. 

Awarded to the winners of the Johnson prize above — B. O. 
McAnney, Adam Nagay and C. G. Warfield. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. — As an incentive to im- 
provement in composition and declamation at an early stage in 
the college course, the literary societies have each instituted a 
yearly contest therein for their respective members from the Sopho- 
more class. All the members of this class in the Union Philosophi- 
cal society have the option of competing, and a gold medal is 
awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest degree of excellence 
in the arts to which the competition relates, as decided by judges 
chosen by the society. 

Not awarded 1913. 

The Wagg Prize, a gold medal, the gift of A. H. Wagg, '09, 
of New \ork, will be awarded to that member of the class in 
American History who shall present the best competitive essay on 
an assigned subject pertaining to the life and public services of 
some distinguished American closely related to Dickinson College 
as founder, trustee, executive, professor, or alumnus. 

Awarded to Clinton DeWitt Van Sinclen, Bayside, N. Y ? 



62 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Walkley Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of W. R. Walk- 
ley, D.C.L., in memory of his only son, Winfield Davidson Walk- 
ley, who died March II, 1903, is awarded as a second prize to 
that member of the Freshman class who shall excel in decla- 
mation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to George W. Bradley, Camden, N. J. 

BENEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of funds and scholarships have been established in 
various ways by friends of education in general and of the college 
in particular, and are awarded largely by the donors or by the 
president to such students as may be in need of financial help. It 
is doubtful whether the same amount of money expended in any 
other way would accomplish a greater service in the cause of 
education than these small sums used to supplement the insufficient 
means at the command of worthy young people seeking an educa- 
tion. It is hoped that their number may be largely increased by 
men and women concerned to do good with their means. 

The Alumni Loan Fund of fifty dollars, contributed by an 
alumnus, to be loaned from year to year to students in need of 
temporary help, to be repaid within a year and again loaned. 

Baltimore Medical College Scholarship, tuition and exami- 
nation fees, to be available for the appointee for the first year of 
his four years' course in the medical school. 

The Bodine Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by George 
I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Arthur Milby Burton Scholarship of fifty dollars, es- 
tablished by Miss Mary R. Burton, for the education of worthy 
young men for the ministry, preference being given to applicants 
residing within the limits of the Philadelphia Conference. 

The Chandler Scholarship of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
D. Harry Chandler, of Vineland, N. J. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship of 
fifty dollars established by Mrs. Emma L. Keen, of Philadelphia, 
as a memorial to her father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, is awarded 
annually to young men preparing for the ministry. 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, 
of New York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, students 
from New York City and vicinity having prior claim. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 63 

The J. W. Feight Memorial Scholarship, the interest on 
one thousand dollars, was established by J. W. Fisher, Esq., of 
Newport, Tenn., in loving memory of the character and services 
of the Reverend J. W. Feight, formerly of the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The fol- 
lowing conditions are observed in its award: First, the recipient 
shall, if possible, be from within the bounds of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference; if from any other territory, that of the 
Baltimore Conference shall be preferred. Second, the award 
shall be, so far as possible, in the form of a loan, to be returned 
as soon as possible after graduation, interest on the loan to begin 
two years after the date of graduation. 

The Freeman Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by 
Frank A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, interest on one 
thousand dollars, the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of 
John Gillespie, Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her 
father. 

The Mary Louise Huntington Fund, the gift of Miss Mary 
Louise Huntington, of Brooklyn, N. Y., is used to aid young men 
of limited means who are preparing for missionary, ministerial, or 
educational work. 

The Lockyer Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by 
Mark B. Lockyer, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Theodore F. Miller Scholarship of fifty dolars, the gift 
of Theodore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Valeria Schall Scholarship of twenty-five dollars is used 
in assisting such young men as, in the estimation of the President 
and Faculty of the college, are of good character, scholarly habits, 
and deserving of assistance, and who are approved candidates for 
the Christian minstry. 

The Charles T. Schoen Scholarships, ten in number, of 
fifty dollars each, established by Charles T. Schoen, Esq., of 
Philadelphia, are awarded annually to such young men and wom- 
en as may be designated by the donor or by the President. 

The A. Herr Smith Scholarship, endowed, averaging one 
hundred dollars per year, is the gift of the late Miss Eliza E. 
Smith, of Lancaster, in memory of her brother, the late Hon. A, 
Herr Smith. 



64 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Cornelia Thumm Scholarship, the annual interest on 
nine hundred and fifty dollars, the legacy of the late Mrs. Cor- 
nelia A. Thumm, of Philadelphia, is used to aid such students as 
may be designated by the President. 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship of fifty dollars, es- 
tablished by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is 
awarded annually to such students as may be designated by the 
donor or by the President. 

The Rev. William Wood Scholarship of fifty dollars, the 
gift of Miss Sarah Wood, of Trenton, N. J., is awarded annually 
to such students as may be designated by the donor or by the 
President. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The trustees have authorized the founding of endowed scholar- 
ships of one thousand dollars each, whose object is to aid 
in extending the privileges of the college to young men of promise 
otherwise unable to command them. 

Such scholarships may be constituted as follows : 

1. The donor of each scholarship shall have the privilege of 
naming it, and of prescribing the conditions on which it shall be 
awarded. 

2. Scholarships may be maintained by the annual payment of 
fifty dollars, as interest, until the principal sum of one thousand 
dollars is paid. They lapse, of course, when the interest fails, 
unless the principal or interest on the same has been paid. 

3. Churches contributing one thousand dollars each, may, if 
they desire it, place upon that foundation the sons of their minis- 
ters, or, in lieu of that, may nominate some other candidate to re- 
ceive its avails. 

BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Dickinson College, in 
the County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof 

shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following. 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 65 

and premises, that is to say , to have and to 

hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its suc- 
cessors and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, 
or knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the 
President of the college, Eugene Allen Noble, Carlisle, Pa., and, 
if practicable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the 
wishes of the testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, 
or the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endow- 
ment of a scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of 
the same in the will provision. 



Register of Students 

C — Classical Course. 

L. S. — Latin-Scientific Course. 

Sc. — Scientific Course. 

Ph. — Philosophical Course. 

P. — Partial course not leading to graduation. 

When no other state is mentioned, residence is in Pennsylvania. 

SENIORS 

Name Course Residence 

Ahl, John C L. S Carlisle 

Auman, Lester W C Mifflintown 

Barnitz, George W C Carlisle 

Beam, Rachael S L. S Carlisle 

Bigham, Ruth Horner L. S Gettysburg 

Bradley, Agnes L L. S Birdsboro 

Brame, E. Grace C Carlisle 

Brenneman, Foster E L. S Carlisle 

Brown, James Paul Ph Wyoming,, Del. 

Brumbaugh, Harry E L. S Greencastle 

Bunting, Frank C L. S Mt. Vernon, Md. 

Cameron, David, 2nd L. S Harrisburg 

Claster, Joel Ph Lock Haven 

Cole, Charles C C Altoona 

Cook, Jay D L. S Carlisle 

Coyle, Mary E L. S Carlisle 

Dietz, George C C Mechanicsburg 

Dunn, Francis A Ph Wilkes-Barre 

Earp, Carlyle R C Elk Ridge, Md. 

Elliott, Matilda S Ph Carlisle 

English, Marguerite L. S Camden, N. J. 

Finton, Iva M C Harrisburg 

Ford, Thomas H L. S Minersville 

Frantz, E. Harold L. S Reading 

Gcissinger, E. Lamont C Tamaqua 

Griffiths, Wesley P C Williamstown 

Handwork, Cora L L. S Birdsboro 

GG 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 67 

SENIORS, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Hauck, George W L. S Mechanicsburg 

Hearn, Walter A L. S Edelman 

Herr, Walter M L. S Salona 

Hertzler, Joseph Z Ph Carlisle 

Hewitt, J. Morris L. S Camden, N. J. 

Hicks, H. Cheston C Williamsport 

Jackson, J. Roy Ph New Buffalo 

Jaggers, F. Yewdell C Philadelphia 

Krall, Mabel E Ph Harrisburg 

Kuller, Franklin A C Alinda 

Langfitt, Helen R L. S Pittsburgh 

Marshall, Raymond E Ph Millburn, N. J. 

McElfish, Russell C C Chaneysville 

Mcintosh, Elton M L. S DuBois 

Melroy, J. Freeman. C Wolfsburg 

Miller, Clinton H L. S Sinking Spring 

Mohler, Fred L C Carlisle 

Mohler, Samuel L C Carlisle 

Morgan, Margaret H C Carlisle 

Nagay, Adam C West Pittston 

Numbers, Walter B C Philadelphia 

Rinehart, Kathryn S L. S Pottstown 

Robinson, William H C Philadelphia 

Rockwell, Emory B L. S Wellsboro 

Rothermel, Ella M L. S Maiden Creek 

Smith, Charles M Ph Laurel, Del. 

Strock, Florence E C Carlisle 

Stuart, Harriet H L. S Carlisle 

Thompson, Margaret M. . . . C Carlisle 

Thompson, Rebecca C Carlisle 

Tyson, Fred A Ph Philadelphia 

Van Siclen, Clinton DeWitt L. S New York City 

Wagner, Charles E L. S Lock Haven 

Waldman, William M Ph Wilkes-Barre 

Williams, Clyde M L. S. Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Wilson, Francis G L. S Harrisburg 

Wilson, Maude E L. Su Brooklyn, N. Y. 



68 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 





JUNIORS 


Name 


Course 


Residence 


Ahl, George W 


Ph. ... 


. . . . Carlisle 


Aller, Paul P 


C 


. . . . Mt. Holly Springs 


Baker, Elias B 


C 


. . . . Philadelphia 


Borton, Everett E. . . 


L. S. .. 


.... Elmer, N. J. 


Bouton, Arthur A. .. 


C 


. . . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bream, Margaret A. 


l. a .. 


. . . . Carlisle 


Bryson, S. Russell . . 


c 


. . . . Mauch Chunk 


Carroll, J. Russell . 


Ph. ... 


. . . . Federalsburg, Md. 


Coleman, A. Edward 


Ph. ... 


.... Allentown 


Cooper, William E. 


Ph. ... 


. . . . Halifax 


Crites, Bartholomew 


E Ph. ... 


.... Williamsport 


Dexter, Mabel A. . . . 


l. a .. 




Edel, William W. .. 


C 


. . . . Baltimore, Md. 


Eshelman, William I 


< l. a .. 




Evans, G. Winifred 


c 


. . . . Tyrone 


Fasick, Ray H 


c 


Carlisle 


Fite, Alonzo S. ... 


c 


. . . . Philadelphia 


Gates, Robert C. . . . 


Ph. ... 


.... Renovo 


Hecht, Lester S. .. 


L. S. . . 


Lock Haven 


Hodgson, Kathryn M 


L. S. .. 


....Felton, Del. 


Hornberger, Hiester 


R C 


.... Sinking Spring 


Howard Elizabeth . 


l. a . . 


.... Mount Carmel 


Johnston, Vernon N. 


l. a .. 


.... Mount Joy 


Kistler, Robert B. . 


l. a .. 


.... Minersville 


Kistler, Walter W. 


l. a .. 


.... Minersville 


Laverty, Lawson S. . 


c 


Harrisburg 


Laubenstein, Paul F. 


c 


. . ... Harrisburg 


Lippincott, Haines ] 


i c 


Swarthmore 


Mason, M. Phyllis . 


l. a .. 


.... Laurel, Del. 


Mathis, Walter I. . 


ph. ... 


.... Camden, N. J. 


Meily, Joseph 


l. a .. 


.... Mechanicsburg 


Milligan, Robert D. 


Ph. ... 


.... Wellsville 


Morgan, Hugh C. . . 


c 


.... Carlisle 


Neff, J. Luther 


c 


.... Gordon 


Nelson, G. Helene . 


Ph. ... 


Trenton, N. J. 


Neyhard, Helen B. . 


l. a . . 


.... Carlisle 


Peters, Eva 


l. a . . 


.... Uriah 


Reiff, Roberta 


l. a .. 


.... New Cumberland 


Ritchey, Irene C. . . 


ph. ... 


.... Carlisle 


Sellers, M. Ruth .. 


l. a .. 


.... Carlisle 


Sheplcr, William H. 


Ph. ... 


.... Carlisle 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



69 



JUNIORS, continued 



Name 

Small, J. Ohrum ... 
Spitznas, James E. . 
Wallace, David M. .. 
Warfield, Clarence G. 
Warren, Howard B. 
Watts, Chester E. .. 
Whiteley, Miriam F. 
Wilson, Stanley G. . 



Allison, Albert H. . . 
Bradley, George W. 
Brewer, Raymond R. 
Bucher, Mabel V. .. 
Craig, Margaret A. . 
Curran, Thomas V. . 
Dysart, Russell B. . . 
Everngam, J. Lester 
Fasick, Harold A. . 

Fox, John H 

Ganoe, Robert L. . . . 
Garner, G. Dickson . 
Graham, Daniel F. . . 
Greenig, William F. 
Gottleib, Abraham . 
Hagner, Leonard G. 
Harman, Charles H. 
Jeffrey, Thomas R. 
Lauman, Helen D. . . 
Lepperd, J. Wayne . . 
Lippincott, Samuel T. 

Lutz, Sylvia P 

Malcolm, Gilbert ... 
Massey, Reynolds C. 
Maxwell, Robert H. . 
McMahon, Mary J. 
McWhinney, Russell 
Michael, Raymond S. 

Mitchell, Ina E 

Moose, George C. .. 
Mount joy, Harry W. 



Course 


Residence 


Sc. ... 


Laurel, Del. 


L. S. . 


Frostburg, Md. 


L. S. . 


Middletown 


L. S. . 


Rockville, Md. 


C. ... 


Selbyville, Del. 


L. S. . 


Carlisle 


C. ... 


Ralston 


L. S. . 


Hagerstown, Md. 


SOPHOMORES 


Ph. .. 


Shippensburg 


L. S. . 


Camden, N. J. 


C. ... 


Sylvan 


L. S. . 


Carlisle 


L. S. . 


Maplewood, N. J. 


L. S. . 


Minersville 


L. S. . 


Bellwood 


Ph. . . 


Denton, Md. 


C. ... 


Carlisle 


Ph. . . 


Carlisle 


L. S. . 


Chambersburg 


Ph. . . 


Harrisburg 


Ph. .. 


Harrisburg 


L. S. . 


Wenonah, N. J. 


Ph. . . 


Wilkes-Barre 


Ph. .. 


Wilmington, Del. 


L. S. . 


Youngwood 


C. ... 


Pen Argyl 


L. S. . 


Mt. Holly Springs 


L. S. . 


Carlisle 


s C. ... 


Swarthmore 


Ph. .. 


Carlisle 


Sc. ... 


New York City 


L. S. . 


Goshen, N. J. 


P. ... 


Pottstown 


L. S. . 


Harrisburg 


R. . . . L. S. . 


Homestead 


Ph. . 


Harrisburg 


L. S. 


Beach Lake 


Ph. . 


Luthersburg 


C. 


Boyertown 



70 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORES, continued 



Name 

Needy, A. Norman .. 
Nieman, Benjamin L 
Prather, Perry F. . . 
Reeves, Arthur M. . 
Reeves, William H. 
Reisler, Herbert S. . 
Reitz, Charles H. . 
Rogers, D. Paul . . . 
Rupert, Beatrice E. 
Schellinger, Ethel M 
Shelley, Daniel H. 
Shuey, Anna M. . . 
Simmons, Alfred G. 
Smith, C. Hammond 
Stevens, John M. . . 
Tabor, Elwood G. . 

Wagg, Ethel 

Watkins, Helen H. 
Wiener, Amelia K. . 
Woods, Agnes S. . 
Zimmerman, G. Floyd 



Course 



Residence 



Andrus, Albert S. . . 
Bagenstose, Abner H 
Baker, Forence D. . 

Baker, Oris J 

Bashore, Ralph M. . . 

Bashore, R. Guy 

Bealor, H. Mark 

Bobb, Mary C 

Brendle, Bert K. . . . 
Brookmire, James G. 
Brooks, Warren F. . . 
Burke, J. Raymond 

Burton, Wm. F 

Byars, Ralph O 

Campbell, William E. 
Compton, Lewis V. . 

Corson, Fred P 

Courtney, Berkeley . 



. . Ph Waynesboro 

. . Ph Northampton 

. . L. S Clear Spring, Md. 

. . P Harrisburg 

.. P Millville, N. J. 

. . L,. S Nottingham 

. . L. S Mount Carmel 

. . Sc Harrisburg 

. . L. S. Carlisle 

. . L. S. Green Creek, N. J. 

. . L. S Mechanicsburg 

. . Ph Bellefonte 

, . . Ph Hazleton 

. . P Williamsport 

. . C Georgetown, Del. 

, . . C Brooklyn, N. Y. 

. . . L. S Collingswood, N. J. 

. . . Ph Maplewood, N. J. 

.. L. S. Carlisle 

,..L. S Carlisle 

. . . Ph Williamsport 



FRESHMEN 



Ph Eddystone 

L. S Orwigsburg 

L. S Mt. Holly Springs 

C Curwensville 

L. S Tremont 

P Tremont 

P Shamokin 

L. S Carlisle 

Ph Coatesville 

L. S Port Carbon 

Sc York 

L. S Bedford 

L. S Seaford, Del. 

L. S Alvcrton 

L. S Mechanicsbttrg 

Ph Dias Creek, N. J. 

I, S Millville, N. J. 

L. S Millcrsville, Md. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 71 

FRESHMEN, continued 
Name Course Residence 

Dalton, Allan B Sc Chester 

Davies, Elbert L L. S Montrose 

Davis, Michael F L. S Eatontown, N. J. 

Deeter, Jasper N., Jr L. S Harrisburg 

Dietrich, Mark S C Carlisle 

Dolby, Delbert I, L. S Seaf ord, Del. 

Dougherty, William M Ph Millville, N. J. 

Ede, Francis H. S C Pen Argyl 

Eichhorn, Oscar J Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

Eppley, Mervin G Ph Carlisle 

Evans, Marion G L. S Tyrone 

Evans, Miriam G L. S Tyrone 

Filler, Donald B C Carlisle 

Frescoln, Leonard H Ph Pottstown 

Gisriel, Joshua L Sc Baltimore, Md. 

Goodhart, Fred E Sc Allen 

Goodyear, Jacob M L. S Carlisle 

Goong, Winfield Ph Chung King, China 

Groome, Walter G P Portage 

Hartzell, Max Sc Harrisburg 

Heck, Paul W Ph Coatesville 

Hering, George C, Jr L. S Felton, Del. 

Hertzler, Lyman G Ph Carlisle 

Hoff, Samuel H Ph Lykens 

Hollinger, J. Frank P Carlisle 

Hoover, George V L. S Penbrook 

Hopkins, Joseph A L. S Harrisonville, N. J. 

Humer, Christian P C Carlisle 

Irwin, J. Rodney Ph Munhall 

Johnson, Lloyd R L. S Asbury, N. J. 

Jones, Helen L. S Carlisle 

Keat, S. Harold P Carlisle 

Leidigh, George W C Carlisle 

Leidigh, Margery F C Carlisle 

Lyon, Earl C Sc Atlantic City, N. J. 

McCabe, Joshua B. C Bishopville, Md. 

McCready, James C Ph Summit Hill 

McMillan, Margaret V L. S Carlisle 

Marks, Gordon M Ph Carlisle 

Martin, John E L. S Carlisle 

Mead, Douglass S Ph Greenwich, Conn. 



72 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

FRESHMEN, continued 
Name Course Residence 

Meek, Anna Elizabeth . . . . L. S Carlisle 

Meek, Roy S E. S East Altoona 

Meredith, Gladys W E. S Maplewood, N. J. 

Mohler, Anna E. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Mohler, Nora M C Carlisle 

Mohler, Roy W E. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Morgan, Ezra O E. S Bridgeton, N. J. 

Mumma, Samuel E E. S Highspire 

Murray, Lin R Ph Shippensburg 

Myers, Robert E, Jr E. S Camp Hill 

Nicklas, Charles R Ph Chambersburg 

Norton, Edward C Ph Cape May Court House, N. J. 

Nuttle, Harold C Ph Denton, Md. 

Perry, Clayton C P Scottdale 

Price, Harry L E. S Minersville 

Priddis, Milton R E. S Carlisle 

Puderbaugh, J. Frank P Eldorado 

Reiff, Janet E L. S New Cumberland 

Respess, Homer M E. S Baltimore, Md. 

Reuwer, Joseph F E. S Paxtang 

Riegel, Margaret E Ph Harrisburg 

Robinson, H. Delmer E. S Winchester, Va. 

Rubinofsky, Jacob C Hazleton 

Sharman, David, Jr E. S Fritztown 

Shelley, Carl B Ph Steelton 

Shollenberger, Clarence E., Jr. E. S Auburn, N. J. 

Shuey, Herman J E. S Harrisburg 

Shumpp, Cecilia M E. S Carlisle 

Snyder, E. Olma C Carlisle 

Stapleton, W. Maynard . . . E. S Pottsville 

Steckel, Earl H P Slatington 

Stephens, William G E. S Carlisle 

Strite, Albert E. S Chambersburg 

Stuart, Christine B E. S Carlisle 

Taylor, Eloyd E E. S East Stroudsburg 

Trego, Elmer E Ph Carlisle 

VanAukcn, Clark E C Blairstown, N. J. 

Warner, Marie E C Carlisle 

Wa. Ik-Id, Gaither P E. S Rockville, Md 

Weinberg, I >avid Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

White, J. Gilbert E. S Lewittown 

Woodward, Robert K C Fort Ituachua, Arisona 

Young, Edmund G E S Tunkhannock 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission, 18 

Admission, Requirements 

for, 19-22 

Alumni Associations, 52-54 

Alumni Fund Committee, . . 54 

Alumni Statistics, 7 

Astronomy, , 40 

Athletic Association, 56,57 

Athletic Field, 44 

Bible, 28 

Bills, College, 47-49 

Biology, 28-29 

Botany, 28 

Calendar, College, 5, 6 

Certificates, 18 

Chemistry, 29, 30 

Courses of Study, 23,24 

Degrees, 46 

Degrees Conferred 1913,. . .15-17 

Economics, 31-33 

Education, 40, 41 

English, 33,34 

Ethics, 40 

Examinations, 46 

Expenses, 47-49 

Faculty, College, 12-14 

French, 34,35 

General Regulations, -46-50 

Geology, 35 

German, 35,36 

Government and Discipline, 47 
Gowns, Hoods, and Caps,.. 49, 50 

Greek, 36 

Grounds and Buildings, 43 

Gymnasium, 44 

Heredity 29 



PAGE 

History, 36,37 

International Law, 37 

Latin, 37,38 

Law, 38 

Library, 45 

Library Guild, 55 

Literature, 33 

Literary Societies, 5*, 52 

Material Equipment, 43*45 

Mathematics, 39, 40 

Oratory, 40 

Organizations, College, 51-57 

Order of Studies. 

Freshman Class, 25 

Sophomore Class, 25, 26 

Junior Class, 26, 27 

Senior Class, 27 

Phi Beta Kappa Society, ... 55 

Philosophy, 40,41 

Physical Training, 41 

Physics, 41,42 

Prizes, 58-62 

Psychology, 40 

Scholarships, 62-64 

Scholarships, Endowed, .... 64 
Senate and Student Assem- 
bly, .'. 55,56 

Sociology, 31, 32 

Trustees, Board of, 8-9 

Visitors, Official, n 

Worship, 47 

Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, 52 

Young Women's Christian 

Association, 52 

Zoology, 29 




iH 



75 



|hn, Registrar 
if Illinois 



« 



Wtkinxon College 
pulletm 



Vol. IX 



NOVEMBER, 1914 



No. 3 



The Catalogue 

1914-1915 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY— MAY— JULY 
NOVEMBER 



Entered as second-class matter, January 19, 1906, at the post-office at Carlisle, Fa. 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



* 



CATALOGUE OF 



Biriunsion College 



1914-1915 



132nd Annual Session 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MDCCCCXIV 



± 1914 



JULY 



S 

M 
T 
W 
T 
F 
S 



5 1219 26 
6'13|20|27 

7jl4i21 28 



8115 
9)16 

1017 
11 18 



AUGUST 



S 
M 
T 
W 
T 
F 
S 



613 

7 14 

8 15 



16 23 



2027 
21J28 
22|29 



SEPTEMBER 



S 
M 
T 
W 
T 
F 
S 



6|l3 2027 
7114 2128 

8|15j2229 

9.16 23 30 

10|l724 

11 18 25 

12 19 26 



OCTOBER 



S 
M 
T 
W 
T 

F 

S 



4|11 
5 12 
6 ( I3 

7 14 
15 



18|25 
1926 
2027 
2128 
2229 
23130 
24'31 



NOVEMBER 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 



8 15 

9 16 

10 17 

11,18 

12 19 

6J13 20 

1421 



DECEMBER 



S 

M 
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w 
T 

F 

s 



611 
7 14 
X IS 
9 [6 



20 

21 

22 

23 

HI 1 7 24 

11 is 25 

12 iv .7, 



1915 1916 



JANUARY 



S 
M 
T 
W 
T 

F 

S 



13 10 17 24 

|4ill 18|25 
J5I12 19126 
6J13I20 27 
i7 14|2l'28 
18 15!22:29| 



31 



291623130 



FFBRUARY 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 



14 21 

15 22 

16 23 

17 24 



9 
3|10 
4|11 

5 12|19 26 

6 13 20i2 



18 25 



28 



MARCH 



S 

M 
T 
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F 

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14 2128 
15;22 29 
1612330 
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18(25' 

12 19 261 

i3:20|27 



APRIL 



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5il2il9 



MAY 



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14 21 

15 22 



19 26 

27 



JUNE 



S 
M 
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\Y 

T 
F 

S 



613 

7 14 

8 15 

9 L6 
10 17 



20 27 
2128 

22 29 

23 30 
24 



11 18 25 



5; 12 19 26 



JULY 



JANUARY 



S 
M 
T 
W 
T 

F 

S 



4 
5 
6 
7 

1 

2 

3|10 



18 25 
19|26 

2027 



9 16 23!30t 
10:17 24 31? 
Il|l8 25 H 

12 19 26 

13 20 27 

14 21 28 



AUGUST 



FEBRUARY 



S 

M 
T 
W 
T 
F 
S 



411 

5|l2 
6|13 
7|14 



15 22 
1623 
1724 
18|25 
1926 
20 ! 27 



S 

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W 

T 

F 

S 



v 
_ 1* 

1320'27f 
14 21 28J 
1522291 



1623 

17 24 
1825 
19 26 



SEPTEMBER 



MARCH 



i 



s 

M 
T 
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T 
F 
S 



OCTOBER 



3 10 1724 31 

4 11118 25 

5 12 19 26 
6]13 20 27 

7 14 21 28 

8 15 22 29 

9 16 23 30 



NOVEMBER 



S 
M 
T 
W 
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F 
S 



S 

M 
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5 12 



19 26* 



APRIL 



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10117 



1118 

12J19 

6 1320 

7 1421 
1 8 15122 



274. 
28* 
29* 

23 30l 

24 31f 

25i J 

"I 

23 30l 

24 * 

2S 
26 
27 
28 

29 



MAY 



10 17 24 

11 18 25 

12 19 26 
L3 20 2~ 



DECEMBER 



S 
M 
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W 
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F 
S 



14 21 28 



15 

16 
10 17 
11118 

12 19 
1 3 20 



22 29 

2; 30 
24 3 1 
25 
26 
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JUNE 



S 
M 
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s 





5 


L2 


19 


26 


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4 


11 is 




6 


13 


211 


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4-n ^ ■ ^ ■ ^ ■ ^^ ■^ ^ ^ ^ ■ ^ ■ ^ ^ ^ ■■ ^ ■ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ■ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ■^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H4^■^ ^^ ■ ^ ^^ ^*^^^** ^ M ^■ ^H ■■ M '^ l ^^ ^ ^t■♦ 



COLLEGE CALENDAR- 1914-1915 



FALL TERM— 1914 

September 16, Wednesday Entrance examination. 

September 17, Thursday Fall Term begins. 

September 18, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

November 26-December 1 Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 23, Wednesday, 10.30 A.M.Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM— 1915 

January 5, Tuesday, 8.30 a. m Winter Term begins. 

January 25-31 Week of Prayer in College. 

March 5, Friday Intercollegiate Debates. 

March 19, Friday, 10.30 a. m Winter Term ends. 

SPRING TERM— 1915 

March 30, Tuesday, 8.30 a. m Spring Term begins. 

May 21-27 Final examinations, Seniors. 

June 1-5 Final examinations, other classes. 

June 2, Wednesday Commencement exercises of Con- 
way Hall — School for Boys. 

June 5, Saturday, 8 p. m Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 

Prizes. 

June 6, Sunday, 11 a. m Baccalaureate sermon. 

6.30 p.m Campus song service. 

7.30 p..m Address before the College Chris- 
tian Associations. 

June 7, Monday, 2 p. m Senior Class Day exercises. 

4 p.m Annual meeting of the Incorpora- 
tors of the School of Law. 

7 p. m Annual meeting of the Trustees of 

the College. 

8 p.m Concert by the musical organiza- 

tions of the College. 
10 p.m Junior Promenade. 

5 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Spring Term — 1915 — Continued 

June 8, Tuesday, 9.30 a. m Class reunions, followed by Alum- 
ni Association meetings. 
5.00 p.m Meeting of Phi Beta Kappa So- 
ciety. 

8-1 1 p.m President's Reception. 

June 9, Wednesday, 8.15 a. m Class advancements. 

9.30 a.m , Commencement exercises of the 

College and School of Law. 
12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 

FALL TERM— 1915 

September 15, Wednesday Entrance Examination. 

September 16, Thursday, 10.30 a. M.Fall Term begins. 
December 22, Wednesday, 10.30 a. M.Fall Term ends. 









ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total 5,4H 

Legal profession 1,040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits , 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of the United States 1 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 3 

Attorney-Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 39 

Members of State Assemblies 132 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 4 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church I 

Presidents of colleges 42 

Heads of professional schools 10 

Professors in colleges 135 

Superintendents of schools 66 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools 260 

Instructors in lower-grade schools 610 

Note. — This record, it should be observed, does not fully express the useful 
work done by the College, as in the earlier days of the institution the records 
were but indifferently preserved, and as it was last revised more than three 
years ago. 

7 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE President 

FRANK C. BOSLER, ESQ Vice-President 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Secretary 

JOHN S. BURSK Treasurer 

TERM EXPIRES 1918 

J. HENRY BAKER, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

REV. BISHOP JOSEPH F. BERRY, LL.D Philadelphia 

EDWARD M. BIDDLE, JR., Esq Carlisle 

ABRAM BOSLER Carlisle 

Rev.. WILLIAM W. EVANS, D.D Washington, D. C. 

Gen. HORATIO C. KING, LL.D Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ALEXANDER SIMPSON, Jr., LL.D Philadelphia 

BOYD LEE SPAHR, Esq Philadelphia 

C. PRICE SPEER Chambersburg 

Rev.. WILLIAM A. STEPHENS, D.D Carlisle 

Rev. CHARLES W. STRAW, D.D Philadelphia 

Hon. GEORGE R. WILLIS Baltimore. Md. 

TERM EXPIRES 1915 

Rev. LOUIS E. BARRETT, D.D Chestertown, Md. 

WILLIAM D. BOYER, Esq Scranton 

GEORGE D. CHENOWETH, Sc.D Woodbury. N. J. 

JOSEPH E. HOLLAND Milford, Del. 

T. LEONARD HOOVER Now York City 

HARRY I. HUBER, Esq , Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ISAAC McCURLEY, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. THOMAS E. MARTINDALK, I). I) Salisbury, Md 

CHARLES i:. l'k'KTTYMAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

K',v. CORNELIUS W. l'RKTTYMAN, D.D Smyrna, Del, 

JOHN A. SECOfi Uport, End 

Hon. EDWARD C. STOKES Trenton. N. J. 

r, LANE T WKYIMI.I.. MD Baltimore, Md 

Rev. LUTHER T. WIDERMAN, \y\) Baltimore, Md 

8 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 9 

TERM EXPIRES 1916 

HENRY P. CANNON Bridgeville, Del. 

MELVILLE GAMBRILL Wilmington, Del. 

CHARLES J. HEPBURN, Esq Philadelphia 

Rev. FRANK B. LYNCH, D.D Philadelphia 

Gen. JAMES F. RUSLING, LL.D Trenton, N. J. 

WILMER W. SALMON Rochester, N. Y. 

Rev. ROBERT WATT Smyrna, Del. 

WILLIAM L. WOODCOCK, Esq Altoona 

TERM EXPIRES 1917 

Hon. EDWARD W. BIDDLE, Carlisle 

FRANK C. BOSLER, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. WILLIAM P. DAVIS, D.D Camden, N. J. 

ROBERT W. IRVING, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. GEORGE B. WIGHT, D.D Trenton, N. J. 

Rev. BISHOP LUTHER B. WILSON, LL.D New York City 

CHARLES K. ZUG, ESQ Philadelphia 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. Henry Baker Charles J. Hepburn 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr. Robert W. Irving 

Frank C. Bosler James H. Morgan 

Henry P. Cannon Charles W. Straw 

Edward W. Biddle, Chairman 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Wilmer W. Salmon G. Lane Taneyhill 

James H. Morgan, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON TRUSTEES 

Isaac McCurley Boyd L. Spahr 

James H. Morgan Horatio C. King, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Frank C. Bosler 'Robert W. Irving 

James H. Morgan, Chairman 

EFFICIENCY COMMITTEE 

Joseph F. Berry T. Leonard Hoover 

Abram Bosler Harry I. Huber 

George D. Chenoweth Frank B. Lynch 

William P. Davis Alexander Simpson, Jr. 

Charles K. ZuG, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON CONWAY HALL 

Thomas E. Martindai.e Luther T. Wiherman 

Robert Watt Edward W. Biddle 

James 1 1. Morgan, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON AUDIT 

M 1 1.\ iu.i. G \ m briu, Cornelius W. Prettyman 

1 Ii:\kv r. Can m>.\. Chairman 

LO 



FACULTY 



JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph.D., Acting President 

AND PROFESSOR OF GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph.D. 

THOMAS BEAVER PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 

SUSAN POWERS HOFFMAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS 

WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS, Sc.D. 

PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER, A.M., Dean 

AND PROFESSOR OF LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

CORNELIUS WILLIAM PRETTYMAN, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

MONTGOMERY PORTER SELLERS, A.M. 

PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

LEON CUSHING PRINCE, A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF HISTORY 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A.M. 

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF GREEK, AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 
11 



12 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

FACULTY, continued 

♦LEONARD STOTT BLAKEY, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

GEORGE FRANKLIN COLE, A.M. 

PROFESSOR OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

RUTER WILLIAM SPRINGER, A.M., LL.M. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH BIBLE AND GREEK TESTAMENT 

JOHN SCOTT CLELAND, Ph.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

DAVID JUNE CARVER, A.M. 

INSTRUCTOR IN PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS 

SECRETRY OF THE FACULTY 

MISS SARAH K. EGE 

LADY IN CHARGE OF METZGER COLLEGE 

MISS SARA M. BLACK 

SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

ATHLETICS 

Professors Stephens, Craver, Landis 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 
Professors Filler, Mohler, Prettyman, and Shadinger 

GRADUATE WORK 
Professors McIntire, Prince, and ('.odium: 

LIBRARY 
Professors McIntirEi Cole, ind Sellers 
"Abseni on lea\ < , 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 

June, 1914 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. George C. Bacon Rev. William W. Barnes 

Rev. Francis R. BayeEy 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. Morris E. Swartz W. L. Woodcock, Esq. 

Rev. Wileiam L. Armstrong S. W. Dickson 

Rev. Harry E. Crow E. O. Pardoe 

Rev. James B. Brenneman I. N. Swope 

Rev. J. T. Beee Robert F. Rich 

NEW JERSEY 

Rev. Herbert J. Beeting Rev. C. D. V. Conover 

NEW YORK EAST 

Rev. William W. W. Wilson Rev. Richard S. Povey 

NEWARK 

Rev. Jacob E. Washabaugh Rev. E. H. Conklin 

PHILADELPHIA 

Rev. Wayne Channell Rev. John E. McVeigh 

Rev. Henry S. Noon Rev. Roland J. Garber 

Rev. C. Edgar Adamson 

WILMINGTON 

Rev. V. P. Northrup Rev. Henry G. Budd 

WYOMING 

Rev. T. G. Dickinson Rev. B. W. Dix 



13 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE 

1914 
I. HONORIS CAUSA 

LL.D.— DOCTOR OF LAWS 

John Hays, Esq., Carlisle. 

D.D.— DOCTOR OF DIVINITY 

Rev. Lyman P. Powell, Geneva, N. Y. 
Rev. Henry G. Budd, Wilmington, Del. 



II. IN CURSU 

A.M.— MASTER OF ARTS 



Arntzen, Ella Margaret 

Dickinson, '11 
Bean, Albert Morton 

Dickinson, '10 
Burns, Sarah Helen 

Dickinson, '12 
Deardorf, Merle H. 

Dickinson, 'n 
Fry, Clarence Amos 

Dickinson, '12 
Glauser, Willis Klink 

Dickinson, '12 
Henderson, D. Albert 

Dickinson, '12 
Hoffer, Elsie Ferguson 

Dickinson, '07 
Johnson, Martha L. 

Dickinson, '13 
Johnston, Earl Steinford 

Dickinson, '13 
Leixhacit, Magdalene B. 

Dickinson, '10 
Ledden, Roy 

Dickinson, '13 
Lon.i;, Charles M. 

I )ickinson, '1 1 
Montgomery, Helen Kline 

Dickinson, '13 



Quimby, Karl K. 

Dickinson, '11 
Ranck, Mary A. 

Dickinson, '07 
Renn, Paul Richter 

Dickinson, '12 
Roberts, Mary Elma 

Dickinson, '12 
Sharp, William Howard 

Dickinson, '13 
Shenton, Jennie D. 

Dickinson, '11 
Sohn, Walter Robison 

Dickinson, '12 
Speece, Newton Withington 

Dickinson, '12 
Steckel, Harvey Harbaugh 

Dickinson. '12 
Strite, Edwin Durboraw 

Dickinson, '12 
Tuvin, Louis A. 

I Dickinson, '10 
Whitmoyer, Raymond Britton 

I )icldnson, '13 
Williams, Gordon Arch 

I Hckinson, '1 1 
Woodward, C irris W'n.r 

I Dickinson, '12 



1 I 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



15 



A.B.— BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Auman, Lester Ward 
Brame, Edna Grace 
Cole, Charles Chester 
Dietz, George Christian 
Earp, Carlyle Reede 
Finton, Iva Myers 
Geissinger, Elmer Lamont 
Grieeith, Wesley Powell 
Hicks, Henry Cheston 
Jaggers, Frank Yewdall 
KullER, Franklin Abram 
McAnney, Burnett Olcott 



McEleish, Russell Conwell 
Melroy, J. Freeman 
Mohler, Fred Loomis 
Mohler, Samuel Loomis 
Morgan, Margaret Harris 
Nagay, Adam 
Numbers, Walter Bland 
Robinson, William Henry 
Sperow, Wilson Porterfield 
Strock, Florence E. 
Thompson, Margaret M. 
Thompson, Rebecca 



Ph.B.— BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Ahl, John Cary 
Barnitz, George William 
Beam, Rachael Salome 
Bigham, Ruth Horner 
Bradley, Agnes Louise 
Brenneman, Foster Elias 
Brown, James Paul 
Brumbaugh, Harry Emrick 
Bunting, Frank Carpenter 
Cameron, David, 2d 
Cl aster, Joel 
Cook, Jay D. 
Coyle, Mary Emily 
Dunn, Francis Arthur 
Elliott, Matilda Stewart 
English, Marguerite 
Ford, Thomas Henry 
Frantz, Elias Harold 
Handwork, Cora Lacey 
Hargis, James Hepburn 

Wilson, 



Hauck, George W. 
Hearn, Walter Asbury 
Herr, Walter Matson 
Hewitt, Josiah Morris 
Jackson, Josiah Roy 
Krall, Mabel Esther 
Langeitt, Rachael Helen 
Marshall, Raymond Ellsworth 
McIntosh, Elton M. 

RlNEHART, KATHRYN SoUDERS 

Rockwell, Emory B. 
Rothermel, Ella Merkel 
Smith, Charles Melson 
Stuart, Harriet Holmes 
Tyson, Fred Aubrey 
Van Siclen, Clinton Dewitt 
Wagner, Charles Edward 
Waldman, William Milton 
Williams, Clyde Morgan 
Wilson, Francis Glen 
Maude Estelle 



LL.B.— BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Davis, J. Steward 
Dzwonczyk, Paul M. 
Ferrio, George, Jr. 
Fine, John S. 
Fry, Clarence A. 



Glauser, Willis K. 
Kolb, Harry A. 
McCann, Gerald A. 
Means, George W., Jr. 
O'Rorke, James H. 



16 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Powell, D. Gaylord 
Price, David W. 
Reese, Arthur L. 
Renard, Louis E. 
Renn, Paul R. 
Sasscer, Lansdale G. 
Sharp, Clarence W. 
Shearer, Rippey T. 



Shoecraft, Eugene C. 
Snyder, Clinton T. 
Sohn, Walter R. 
Steckel, Harvey H. 
Strite, Edwin D. 
Surran, William B. 
Tobias, Walter M. 
Watkins, William D. 



Admission 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In all 
cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, and, 
if from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college 
will not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for work done in approved secondary schools are 
accepted, and students are admitted to the college on certification 
that the requirements for admission have been fully met ; but cer- 
tificates covering less than the full requirements may or may not 
be accepted, depending upon the amount of the shortage and the 
conditions under which the work was done. However, students in 
arrears in preparation one full year's work in English, or more 
than one year's work in any other study, will be examined on all 
the work offered in the subject or subjects in which there is this 
deficiency. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation from schools or semi- 
naries will not be accepted, but blank forms of certificates for 
work done will be furnished by the college on application, and it 
is required that these certificates be sent to the college direct from 
the principal of the preparatory school. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the college may or may 
not be accepted, depending upon the institution in which the ad- 
vanced work has been done, and the branches of college work for 
which the certificate is offered. In other words, candidates for 
such advanced standing must demonstrate their preparation for 
the work of the advanced classes for which they apply. 

ON EXAMINATION 

Examinations for admission are held on Tuesday of commence- 
ment week, and on the day before the opening of the fall term. 

For advanced standing students must show that they have 
covered in a satisfactory manner both the preparatory work for 
entrance to college and the studies previously pursued by the classes 
they propose to enter. 

17 



18 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

ENTRANCE UNITS 

Requirements for admission are stated in terms of units, a unit 
being a course of study pursued for a year at least four periods of 
forty minutes each per week. Fourteen such units are required 
for admission, and the graduate from the literary course of any ap- 
proved high school or academy should be able to offer the units re- 
quired. 

Units Accepted for Various Subjects 

Minimum. Maximum. 

English 3 3 

Mathematics 2^2 4 

Foreign Languages 4 7 

Latin 2 4 

Greek 2 3 

French 2 3 

German 2 3 

History 1 ^ iy 2 

History — 

Greece and Rome 1 1 

United States y 2 1 

English y 2 1 

General y 2 1 

Science 2 

Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Physical Geography, 
Physiology. 

Required of All Courses 

English 3 

History, Ancient and United States I 1 / 

Mathematics, Algebra and Plane Geometry 2^2 

Additional Requirements for Courses 

Classical — 4 Latin and 3 Greek. 

Latin-Scientific — 4 Latin and * 3 French or German. 

Scientific or Philosophical — 

1. Requirements for Classical or Latin-Scientific Course. 

2. 2 Latin, t 3 French or German, 2 Science. 

3. 4 French ami German, 1 Mathematics, 1 Science. 

*One of Science may lie substituted for one ^\ French or German. 
fOne of additional History, Latin, or Mathematics may be substi- 
tuted for one of French or German, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 19 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
BY SUBJECTS 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose 
work is notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, 
or division into paragraphs. 

i. Reading and Practice. — A certain number of books will 
be recommended for reading, ten of which, selected as prescribed 
below, are to be offered for examination. The form of exami- 
nation will usually be the writing of a paragraph or two on each 
of several topics, to be chosen by the candidate from a consider- 
able number — perhaps ten or fifteen — set before him in the ex- 
amination paper. The treatment of these topics is designed to test 
the candidate's power of clear and accurate expression, and will 
call only for a general knowledge of the substance of the books. 
In every case knowledge of the book will be regarded as less im- 
portant than the ability to write good English. In place of a part 
or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an exercise 
book, properly certified to by his instructor, containing com- 
positions or other written work done in connection with the read- 
ing of the books. In preparation for this part of the requirement, 
it is important that the candidate shall have been instructed in 
the fundamental principles of rhetoric. 

For the years 1914-15. 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books provided for 
reading are arranged in the following groups, from which at least 
ten units are to be selected, two from each group : 

Group I. The Old Testament, comprising at least the chief 
narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, 
Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and Esther; 
the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, 
V, XV, XVI, XVII ; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of 
Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Vergil's ^neid. The 
Odyssey, Iliad, and zEneid should be read in English trans- 
lations of recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted. 

Group II. Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," "Midsummer 
Night's Dream," "As You Like It," "Twelfth Night," "King 
Henry the Fifth," "Julius Cassar." 

Group III. Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe," Part I; Goldsmith's 
"Vicar of Wakefield;" either Scott's "Ivanhoe" or "Quentin 



20 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Durward;" Hawthorne's "House of the Seven Gables;" either 
Dickens' "David Copperfield" or "A Tale of Two Cities;" 
Thackeray's "Henry Esmond;" Mrs. Gaskell's "Cranford ;" 
George Eliot's "Silas Marner;" Stevenson's "Treasure Island." 

Group IV. Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," Part I ; the "Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers" in the Spectator ; Franklin's Auto- 
biography (condensed); Irving's "Sketch Book;" Macaulay's Es- 
says on Lord Clive and Warren Hastings; Thackeray's "English 
Humorists;" Selections from Lincoln, including at least the two 
Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettys- 
burg, the Last Public Address, and Letter to Horace Greeley, 
along with a brief memoir or estimate ; Parkman's "Oregon 
Trail ;" either Thoreau's "Walden," or Huxley's Autobiography 
and selections from Lay Sermons, including the addresses on "Im- 
proving Natural Knowledge," "A Liberal Education," and "A 
Piece of Chalk;" Stevenson's "Inland Voyage" and "Travels with 
a Donkey." 

Group V. Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Books 
II and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, 
Cowper, and Burns; Gray's "Elegy in a Country Churchyard" 
and Goldsmith's "Deserted Village;" Coleridge's "Ancient Mar- 
iner" and Lowell's "Vision of Sir Launfal ;" Scott's "Ladv of the 
Lake;" Byron's "Childe Harold," Canto IV, and "The Prisoner 
of Chillon;" Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Book 
IV, with especial attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley ; 
Poe's "The Raven;" Longfellow's "The Courtship of Miles 
Standish" and Whittier's "Snow-Bound ;" Macaulay's "Lays of 
Ancient Rome" and Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum ;" Tennyson's 
"Gareth and Lynette," "Lancelot and Elaine," and "The Pass- 
ing of Arthur;" Browning's "Cavalier Tunes," "The Lost 
Leader," "How they Brought the Good News from Ghent to 
Aix," "Home Thoughts from Abroad," "Home Thoughts from 
the Sea," "Incident of the French Camp," "Herve Riel," "Plu-i- 
dippides," "My Last Duchess," "Up at a Villa — Down in the 
City." 

II. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination pre- 
supposes the thorough study of each of the works named below. 
The examination will be upon subject-matter, form, and struc- 
ture. In addition, the candidate may be required to answer ques- 
tions involving the essentials of English grammar, and questions 

on the leading tacts in those periods of English literary history to 
which the prescribed works belong. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

For the years 191 4-1 5 the books set for this part of the ex- 
amination will be as follows. 

Shakespeare's "Macbeth;" Milton's "Comus," "L'Allegro," "II 
Penseroso ;" Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration ; Macaulay's "Life of Johnson," or Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns. 

French or German. — Three years' work, recitations daily, 
in either French or German or two years' work in French or Ger- 
man and one year's work in either Botany, Chemistry, Physics, or 
Physical Geography. 

The preparation in French should comprise careful drill in the 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and 
the common irregular verbs, the inflection of adjectives and the 
use of the participles and pronouns, constant attention being paid 
to pronunciation. Much time should be given to translations, both 
oral and written, of easy English into French. From six hundred 
to eight hundred pages of graduated texts should be read. Where 
much attention has been given to oral work, the amount of read- 
ing may be diminished. 

Students offering German as an entrance requirement should 
be thoroughly familiar with the essentials of German Grammar; 
should be able to translate easy English into German ; should 
be able to translate at sight easy German prose, and should be 
able to pronounce with a fair degree of accuracy. Candidates 
offering two years of German for admission to college are ex- 
pected to have read 200 pages of easy German ; those offering three 
years are expected to have read 400 pages besides reading at sight 
in class. From students who have been taught according to the 
Direct Method, a smaller amount of reading will be accepted. 

Greek. — Grammar; Xenophon's "Anabasis," four books; 
Homer's "Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day to 
day in preparation, is recommended, and ability to write simple 
Greek sentences is required. 

History. — Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States. 
The following works will indicate the amount required : Oman's 
"History of Greece," Lehighton's "History of Rome" (to the 
close of the reign of Augustus), or Smith's "Smaller History of 
Rome," McLaughlin's "History of the United States for Schools." 

Latin. — I. The Latin reading required of candidates for ad- 
mission to college, without regard to the prescription of par- 



22 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



ticular authors and works, shall be not less in amount than Caesar, 
"Gallic War," I-IV; Cicero, "The Orations against Catiline," 
"For the Manilian Law," and "For Archias;" Vergil, "yEneid," 
I-VI. 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by 
the schools from the following authors and works: Caesar, "Gallic 
War" and "Civil War;" Nepos, "Lives;" Cicero, "Orations" and 
"De Senectute;" Sallust, "Catiline" and "Jugurthine War;" Ver- 
gil, "Bucolics," "Georgics," and "iEneid ;" and Ovid, "Metam- 
orphoses," "Fasti," and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recommended 
by the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System ; 
Algebra through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, in- 
cluding the solution of one hundred or more original exercises. 



Courses of Study 

The college offers four parallel courses of study, each covering 
four years: the Classical, the Latin-Scientific, the Scientific, and 
the Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are 
largely required ; but, in the last two years, the work is mostly 
elective as shown under Order of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per 
week, are required in the Freshman year, and are elective, three 
hours each per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Clas- 
sical course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by additional 
studies in modern languages and science. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Scientific Course. — Latin and Greek are not required, though 
they may be ofTered for admission, a large amount of time being 
given to studies in science, mathematics, and modern languages. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in May 
and must have the approval of class deans. Change in electives 
may be made for good reason with the consent of class deans dur- 
ing the first three days of the college year, but later changes can 
be made only with consent of the Faculty. 

Extra Elective Studies. — Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of the 
Faculty, such additional work will not interfere with their reg- 
ular work. No student, however, with a general average of less 
than seventy-five per cent, in any year can take more than one 
extra hour of Junior or Senior work the following year. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

In addition to these four regular courses of study leading to 
graduation and an academic degree, the college provides a Partial 
Course for students not planning for so long a college residence as 
would be required to complete the full course. It also makes pro- 
vision by electives for much special preparation along the line of 

23 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

the intended life work of students, especially for those purposing 
to engage in business or to become lawyers, physicians, or teachers. 

Partial Course. Students with uneven preparation may be 
admitted to the college for a Partial Course upon showing by ex- 
amination or otherwise that they are prepared for college work. 
No such student, however, will be admitted unless fully prepared 
in English, History, and one other subject of college preparation, 
nor with less than eleven units of college preparatory work, a unit 
of such work being a year's study in some preparatory subject not 
less than four periods per week. 

Business Course. The college recognizes the fact that an 
ever-increasing number of college-bred men are entering upon busi- 
ness careers, and to meet their needs it offers a large number of 
electives in preparation for their business careers, practical courses 
of cultural value. 

Modern languages are a valuable part of such a course in this 
day of close relations in all the business world, and in addition to 
the ordinary French and German of the college course, Italian and 
Spanish have been added. Spanish especially is likely to be of in- 
creasing value as this country draws nearer in its business life to 
the great and rapidly developing countries of South America. 

At least one course in Economics is required of all candidates 
for a degree, and other similar courses are elective in Modern In- 
dustrial History of Europe, Economic Development of the United 
States, Industrial Organization and Business Management, Prin- 
ciples of Sociology, Social and Economic Problems, and others. 

These electives as part of a cultural course are commended to 
the prospective business man. 

Law Course. In preparation for law, as part of the college 
course three hours per week of law may be elected in the Junior 
year and five hours per week in the Senior year. By judicious elec- 
tion and a little extra work good students may thus save one year 
in their subsequent course in the School of Law, completing the 
law course in two years after graduation instead of the three which 
would otherwise be required. An extra charge, however, is made 
when law is thus elected in place of college work. 

Medical Preparatory Course. All good medical schools to- 
daj require a good deal of preparation beyond that of the high 

school, ranging from the college degree to two years of college 
work; and most good medical schools also require that certain 
particular subjects shall he taken as preparation for their woik. 
Students who propose to Stud] medicine tna\ shape their college 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 25 

course in such way as to meet fully the requirements of any of the 
great medical schools. The completion of the college course is 
strongly recommended for those who expect to study medicine, but 
for those who plan for less than this arrangements can be made 
whereby the requirement of some medical schools may be met in a 
shorter time. Usually this work should not be attempted in less 
than two years. 

Teachers' Course. The growing high school demand for 
college trained teachers has found expression in the school codes 
of most of the progressive states, and on the completion of a col- 
lege course covering certain electives in History and Principles of 
Education, and Psychology, young men and women are given cer- 
tificates to teach in these states. The college thus prepares a 
great many teachers, and they are at once certified by state author- 
ities and authorized to teach in their high schools. No ambitious 
young man or woman ought to consent to enter upon the teacher's 
career as a life work without the college degree. With this degree 
a grade of work is at once open to the teacher which would other- 
wise be closed probably for his or her entire career. The educa- 
tional requirements of Pennsylvania and neighboring states may be 
fully met by proper choice of electives in the college. 

INSTRUCTION 

It is the fixed policy of the college to be a teaching institution, 
and its first aim is to furnish wise and expert teaching leadership 
of the young people of the student body. To attain this end the 
college has steadily exalted the teacher, and its policy has been to 
have only mature men and experienced teachers in its corps of in- 
struction, with no immature or inexperienced tutors. The col- 
lege's teachers, therefore, must all have teaching experience else- 
where before they begin to do its work. 

For the arrangement of the college work in the various regular 
courses of study see Order of Studies, pages 26-8 ; and for further 
description of the work given in individual subjects see pages 29-44. 



ORDER OF STUDIES* 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Classical Course 

English, A 

Greek, B 

History, A 

Latin, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 



Philosophical Course 

English, A 

French, A or B 

German, A or D 

*Greek A 

History, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 



Latin-Scientific Course 

English, A 

French, \ one of B 

German, j these D 

♦Greek A 

History, A 

Latin, A 

Mathematics, A 

Oratory. 

Scientific Course 

English, A 

French, A or B 

German, A or D 

♦Greek A 

History, .A 

Mathematics, A or B 

Oratory. 



■Greek may be substituted for French, German, or Latin. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Classical Course 
Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Economics, A 

English, B 

Elective Studies (Elect nine 
hours) 

Chemistry, C 

German, A 

Greek, C 

Latin B 

Mathematics, B 



Latin-Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English B 

Elective Studies (Elect six 
hours) 

French, A or C 

German A or E 

Greek, A 

Latin B 

Mathematics B 



•For explanation of courses indicated by capital letters see page 
29-44. 



26 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORE CLASS, continued 
Philosophical Course Scientific Course 



Required Studies 

Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English, B 

French, . | one of ... .A or C 
German, J these ... .A or E 
Elective Studies (Elect three 
hours) 

French A or C 

German, A or E 

Greek, A 

Mathematics, B 

Physics, C 



Biology, A 

Chemistry, C 

Economics, A 

English, B 

Mathematics, B 

Physics, C 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Classical Course Scientific Course 



(Elect sixteen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, C, D, or F 

Economics,. . D, E, or H and I 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

French, A 

German, B 

Greek, D and E or A 

History, B and C 

Italian, A 

Latin, C 

Law, A 

Mathematics, C and F 

Physics, C 

Psychology, B 

Sociology, F, G, or J 

Spanish, A 



Required Studies 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, F 

Physics, F 

Elective Studies (Elect four 
hours) 
Economics,. .D, E, or H and I 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

French, B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History, B and C 

Italian, A 

Law, A 

Mathematics, C and F 

Psychology, B 

Sociology, F, G, or T 

Spanish, A 



28 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



JUNIOR CLASS 

latin-Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Physics, C 

Elective Studies (Elect thir- 
teen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, D or F 

Economics,. . D, E, or H and I 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

French, B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History, B and C 

Italian, A 

Latin, C 

Law, A 

Mathematics, C and F 

Psychology, B 

Sociology, F, G, or J 

Spanish, A 

SENIOR CLASS 



continued 

Philosophical Course 

(Elect sixteen hours) 

Botany, B 

Chemistry, D or F 

Economics,. . D, E, or H and I 

English Bible, A 

English, C and D 

French, B or C 

German, B or F 

Greek, A 

History, B and C 

Italian, A 

Law, A 

Mathematics, C and F 

Physics, C or F 

Psychology, B 

Sociology, F, G, or J 

Spanish, A 






Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Phil- 
osophical Course 
(Elect sixteen hours) 

Astronomy, K 

Chemistry, I 

Economics,. . D, E, or H and I 

Education, F 

English, E and F 

French, B or C 

Geology, A 

German, C or F 

Greek, D and E or A 

Heredity, D 

History, D and E 

International Law, F 

Italian, A 

Latin, I) or E 

Law B, C, Or I) 

Mathematics C and F 

Philosophy E 

Physics F 

So< iologj , F, ( i, or J 

Spanish, A 

Zoology C 



Scientific Course 
Required Studies 

Chemistry, I, J, K, or L 

Astronomy, K, or Geology, A 

Physics, H or I 

Zoology, C 

Elective Studies (Elect eight 
hours) 

Astronomy, K 

Economics, . . D, E, or H and I 

Education, F 

English, E and F 

French, B or C 

Geology A 

( rerman, C or F 

Greek A 

Heredity D 

History D and E 

International Law F 

Italian A 

Law B, C or D 

C and F 

I • 

.. . ,F, G, 01 I 
\ 



aw 

\ I athematic 
Philosophy, 
Sociology . . 
Spanish, . . 



DICKIXSOX COLLEGE 29 

BIBLE 

Associate Professor Springer 

The course in English Bible aims to determine the underlying 
facts upon which the Scriptural narrative is based ; and, in and 
through these facts, to form a correct view of the evolution of reli- 
gious thought and of its relation to present-day religious and ethical 
ideals. To this end, the Bible itself is used as the text-book, orig- 
inal study therein being developed by quizzes, written summaries 
and analyses, short essays, and debates; and these studies are di- 
rected and supplemented by frequent lectures upon the Scriptural 
narrative, the text, contemporary history, and ethnical and scien- 
tific side-lights, all aiming to bring the facts vividly to mind. The 
books are rearranged according to the order of the events narrated, 
and special attention is given, as these subjects are reached, to char- 
acter-studies, literary form, textual accuracy, inspiration, the suc- 
cessive canons of Scripture, and kindred topics. The methods are 
inductive, the standpoint is modern, non-sectarian, constructive 
orthodox, and the aim is rather to stimulate individual thought 
and investigation along safe lines than to reach predetermined or 
dogmatic conclusions. A two years' course, two hours per week, 
the courses alternating from year to year, Old Testament begun 
in 1915. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Stephens 

A. General Biology. To meet the needs of the general 
student. The course in General Biology, required of all Sopho- 
mores, consists of one hour recitation and one period of two hours 
laboratory work per week for a year. 

B. Botany. During the fall and winter terms the work is 
largely plant morphology. During the spring term some time 
is devoted to field work, the emphasis being put upon the study of 
plants from the ecological standpoint. Open to Juniors, and con- 
sists of one hour recitation and two two-hour periods of laboratory 
work per week. 

C. Zoology. The aim is to present a course giving a com- 
prehensive view of the animal kingdom and serving as a basis for 
further study. Open to Seniors, and consists of one hour recita- 
tion and one two-hour period of laboratory work per week. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

D. Heredity. The purpose of this course is to give the 
student the cumulative discoveries of the past decade in this line 
of research, and to consider with candor the bearing of these dis- 
coveries upon the conservation of the race. Elective to Seniors, 
one hour per week. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Shadinger 

The chemical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the east 
wing of the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. The main labora- 
tory contains desks for ninety-two students. The smaller labora- 
tory for advanced work accommodates twenty-four. Each student 
is furnished with a desk and apparatus necessary for the per- 
formance of the experiments under the supervision and instruction 
of the professor. 

A. Lecture Course. Instruction in general Inorganic 
Chemistry is given to all students in the sophomore year (except 
those of the classical course electing Chemistry or Physics in the 
junior year). The aim of this course is to cover the fundamental 
principles of the science in connection with the descriptive chem- 
istry of the non-metallic elements. The elements of Theoretical 
Chemistry are taught and the students given practice in stoichio- 
metrical and other chemical problems. Two hours per week. 

B. Laboratory Course. The laboratory work of the first 
year consists of the performance by each student of a series of ex- 
periments, illustrating the important general principles and facts 
of the science, the properties of the more important non-metallic 
elements, and the laws of chemical action. The details of manipu- 
lation of these experiments are given, but with a view to cultivat- 
ing the powers of observation. The student is required to observe 
carefully and describe clearly the results of each experiment. Two 
hours (counting as one) per week. 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Lecture Course. An elective course devoted to the 

principles of theoretical and physical chemistry, such ;is the kinctic- 
molecular hypothesis, theory of solution, atomic hypothesis, chem- 
ical equilibrium, theory of dissociation in solution, elect rol\ sis, 
and the laws of mass action. This is followed by a study of the 

metallic elements based upon the periodic system. Prerequisite ; 

Course A. Two hours per week. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

E. Laboratory Course. Qualitative Analysis, to accom- 
pany Course D. The usual course of preliminary work and analy- 
sis of simple and complex substances is pursued. The ionic theory 
and laws of mass action are applied to this work. Six hours 
(counting as three) per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. Lecture Course. Organic Chemistry. An elective 
course devoted to the principal classes of organic compounds, ali- 
phatic and aromatic, with emphasis upon class reaction and the 
structural theory. Prerequisite: courses A and B, and preferably 
D and E. Two hours per week. 

H. Laboratory Course. A course in Organic Preparations 
to accompany lecture course G. Laboratory work in the prepara- 
tion and purification of compounds selected from the aliphatic and 
aromatic series for the illustration of important synthetic reac- 
tions ; verification of the constants of these compounds ; methods 
of organic analysis. Four hours (counting as two) per week. 

I. Courses G and H combined. 



J, K, and 

Laboratory Course. A course in Quantitative Analysis in 
its several branches. The work comprises a series of experiments 
which illustrate the fundamental principles of gravimetric and 
volumetric methods. The course is flexible, and great latitude 
will be allowed students manifesting interest and ability. Pre- 
requisite; courses A, B, C, and D. 

J. Four hours to count as two. 

K. Eight hours to count as four. 

L. Twelve hours to count as six. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Blakey, Associate Professor Cleland 

In its course of instruction, the chief aim of the department of 
Economics and Sociology is to give a general view of the most im- 
portant subject matter in the economic and sociological sciences, 
beginning with the elements of the science and passing by degrees 
to courses of an investigative order. In addition to this broad 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

general outline the courses and the methods of study are arranged 
to give some specialized preparation to students looking forward 
to business careers. 

A. Elements of Economics. 

This course will give the student a general survey of the fields 
of theoretical and practical economics. The first part deals with 
the principles of production, distribution, exchange and consump- 
tion of wealth ; the second part, with the present organization of 
industry and the economic and social problems arising from the 
relations of employers and employees. Among the problems con- 
sidered are the labor problem, including the history and policies 
of trade unions, injunctions, arbitration, co-operation, profit-shar- 
ing, child labor, factory legislation, workingmen's insurance, and 
socialism. Seager's Principles of Economics will be used as a 
text. 

Required of all Sophomores. Three hours per week. 

B. Modern Industrial History of Europe. 

After a brief survey of the economic conditions in the Euro- 
pean countries at the close of the Middle Ages, the course deals 
with the commercial and industrial development of the chief 
European countries since the middle of the eighteenth century, 
with special attention to Great Britain. 

Lectures, supplemented by prescribed topical readings. Open 
to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours per week. First half-year. 

C. Economic Development of the United States. 

A brief survey of the economic life of the colonists will be fol- 
lowed by a study of the factory system, public land policy, trans- 
portation facilities, and shipping before the Civil War; export 
trade, scientific agriculture, and railway extension after the War ; 
recent development of large scale production, industrial combina- 
tions, and labor problems. 

Lectures, supplemented by prescribed topical readings. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours per week, second 
half-year. 

I). Courses B and C combined. 

E. Industrial Organization and Business Manage- 
ment. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

This course will include an examination of the human and 
physical factors in the organization and processes of industry ; the 
internal economies of organization due to the division of labor, 
etc. ; external economies of organization due to the concentration 
and integration of businesses; and the influences of the modern 
means of intercommunication on businesses. Special emphasis will 
be given to the growing size and complexity of modern business 
structure and to the managerial, financial, and political questions 
arising from business concentration, and the programs proposed 
for their solution will be analyzed. 

Attention is given to the general nature and the different types 
of business management, and to the functions of the entrepreneur. 
The various problems involved in the philosophy, demands, and 
applicability of scientific management will be examined. The 
course closes with an analysis of the growing spirit of co-operation 
in business management, the growing interest in the problems of 
vocational guidance, and the tendency to interpret industry in 
terms of human worth. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. Open to Sen- 
iors. Three hours per week. 

F. Principles of Sociology. 

Beginning with a study of the biological and psychological bases 
of human society, this course traces its evolution under the oper- 
ation of the various forces — physical environment, growth and 
migration of populations, social institutions, etc. — and analyzes 
social phenomena with the view of arriving at certain laws of 
social progress and noting their bearing upon present social prob- 
lems. 

Chapin's Introduction to the Study of Social Evolution and 
Cooley's Social Organization will be used as texts. Three hours 
per week. 

G. Social and Economic Problems. 

The work of this course will consist largely of practical inves- 
tigations, by individual members of the class, of some selected 
problem in economics or sociology, to be assigned by the instruc- 
tor and pursued under his direction. A paper will be prepared on 
the assigned topic, the results presented before the class for crit- 
icism and discussion. The course will open with an introduction 
to the principles, theory, and practice in the statistical method. 
Open to Seniors completing Economics E or Sociology F. Three 
hours per week. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

H. Trusts and Business Combinations. 

Attention is given to the types of simple business combinations 
and to the genesis of the trust and the holding-company. The 
promotion and organization of the corporation is studied. The lat- 
ter part of the course provides for a study of the trust from the 
social point of view, and for an examination of recent legislation 
and of various suggested methods of dealing with the great indus- 
trial combinations. Text book and collateral readings. 

Three hours per week, first half-year. 

I. Labor Problems and Trade Unions. 

A study of the characteristic features of American industry with 
reference to labor problems, and of the organization, method, and 
achievement of the trade union. Attention will be given to the 
methods employed in the conduct of strikes and boycotts, and to 
such subjects as, — the open and the closed shop, the plans for arbi- 
tration and conciliation, industrial efficiency, proposed labor legis- 
lation, and to the Federal and State laws and decisions relating to 
labor. Text book and collateral readings. 

Three hours per week, second half-year. 

J. Modern Philanthropy. 

This is a course in social economy, a study of the preventive 
and educational measures now developing for the improvement of 
social conditions. Attention is given to the prominent causes of 
poverty, the dependent and defective classes, the development of 
systems of poor-relief and to modern methods in public and private 
charity. Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. 

ENGLISH 

Professors Mclntire and Sellers 

A. Rhetoric and Composition, based upon English Composi- 
tion in Theory and Practice, b] Canbj and others. Required of 

all Freshmen, tour hours per week. Professor Sellers. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

B. An introduction to the history of English literature with 
illustrative readings in class and in private reading courses. The 
text-book is supplemented by lectures and comments. Newcomer's 
English Literature. Newcomer and Andrews' Twelve Centuries 
of English Poetry and Prose. Required of all Sophomores, three 
hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

C. Development of the English language. Offered in alter- 
nate years; offered in 191 5-1 6. Elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors, three hours per week. Professor Sellers. 

D. Literary Criticism. Winchester's Principles of Literary 
Criticism is used as a text-book and Newcomer and Andrews 1 
Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose as supplementary 
reading and application. Elective to Juniors who have taken Eng- 
lish B, two hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

E. American Literature. Page's The Chief American Poets 
is used as a text-book, and is supplemented by Pancoast's Intro- 
duction to American Literature (Revised) and a private reading 
course. Elective to students who have taken English D, two hours 
per week. Professor Mclntire. 

F. English Drama, consisting of lectures, readings, and re- 
ports. The readings are largely in the works of Shakespeare and 
his contemporaries. Elective with the permission of the instructor 
to a limited number of Seniors who have taken English D, two 
hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Stephens 

A. Geology. An introduction to the science of Geology, both 
for students who are planning further scientific pursuits, and also 
for the larger class who wish merely to obtain an outline of the 
methods and principal results of the subject. Open to Seniors, 
two hours per week. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Prettyman 

A. Beginners' Course. German Grammar. German Prose. 
Practice in writing German. The work in this course is conducted 
in German according to the Direct Method. 

Three hours per week. 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

B. A continuation of Course A, and is open only to students 
who have completed that course. The method is the same, the 
work being conducted in German. Three hours per week. 

C. A continuation of B, and is open only to students who have 
completed that course. Three hours per week. 

D. German Prose and Poetry. Grammar and practice in 
writing German. Required of Freshmen who offer two years 
of German for admission to college. Four hours per week. 

E. History of German Literature. German Prose Composi- 
tion. This course is a continuation of Course D and is intended 
for those who have completed that course. Three hours per week. 

F. History of German Literature. Lectures. Reading of 
representative works. Advanced Prose Composition. This course 
is open to students who have completed D and E; and may be 
elected a second year, as the works read are not the same in suc- 
cessive years. Three hours per week. 

GREEK 

Professor Morgan and Associate Professors Craver and 

Springer 

A. Beginners' Course. Grammar and composition. Anabasis. 
The language training of the college student is relied upon for 
speedy preparation to read easy Greek. Open tc such students as 
have not before taken Greek. Four hours per week, to count as 
four hours for Freshmen and three hours for others. 

B. Freshmen Greek. Various Attic authors are read, but 
special emphasis is laid upon forms and syntax to the end that the 
student may be ready for somewhat rapid reading in subsequent 
years. Required of classical Freshmen four hours per week. 

C. Sophomore Greek. Plato, the orators, and Greek trag- 
edy furnish the texts for the course, which also gives much at ton 
tion to Greek literature. Three hours per week. 

I). One course in classical (neck is offered to Seniors and 
Juniors together. To avoid repetition of work by any Student 

and to allow election for both the junior and senior years, the 
material of the course alternates from \ear to year. In E914-15 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

the subject will be Homer and the Lyric Poets. Three hours per 
week. 

E. New Testament Greek. In the junior and senior years 
New Testament Greek may be elected. During these two years 
it is possible to read a large part of the Greek New Testament, the 
Gospels and the Epistles being studied in alternate years, com- 
mencing with 1 91 4. Textual criticism, sight reading, New Testa- 
ment introduction, and contemporary philosophy and history are 
given special attention. Two hours per week. 

HISTORY 
Professor Prince 

A. Political and Constitutional History of England. 
From the earliest times to the close of the Napoleonic wars. Re- 
quired of Freshmen, two hours per week 

B. American History. — From 1750 to the close of Recon- 
struction. Open to Juniors. Three hours per week. 

C. Civilization in Europe. — A philosophic study of the his- 
tory of Western Europe from the Fall of the Roman Empire to 
the close of the French Revolution. — Open to Juniors. Two 
hours per week. 

*D. Spain and the Spanish-American Colonies. — An an- 
alysis of the parallel processes of national expansion and decay 
from the accession of Charles I to the end of the reign of Charles 
III, supplemented by a survey of Spanish colonial development. 
Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

*E. Europe from the Congress of Vienna. — The theme 
of this course is the struggle between monarchy and democracy 
as the central fact in the political history of Europe in the Nine- 
teenth Century. Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

F. International Law. — The historical development of the 
comity of states and the nature and growth of the rules which 
govern their intercourse. Open to Seniors. Two hours per week. 

ITALIAN 

(See Romance Languages.) 



*D and E are given in alternating years. D given in 1914-15. 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LATIN 
Professor Filler 

A. Freshman Latin. Selections from Sallust, Livy, Cicero. 
Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed and emphasis laid upon 

the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is given to 
translation in the class-room, and to the writing of Latin Prose. 
Roman History is reviewed. 

The course is largely devoted to drill-work, and aims to prepare 
the student for the intelligent and sympathetic reading of Latin 
literature in subsequent courses. Open to Freshmen. Four hours 
per week. 

B. Sophomore Latin. Readings from the poets, chiefly Plautus, 
Terence, and Horace; an outline study of the History of Latin 
Literature with illustrative readings. 

In the first half-year Classical Mythology is rapidly reviewed 
with particular reference to its use in literature and art. 
' In the second half-year the Manners and Customs of the Ro- 
mans are considered. Open to Sophomores. Three hours per 
week. 

For those who have completed A and B one or two of the fol- 
lowing courses will be given each year, according to the needs and 
desires of those electing advanced work. 

In Courses C and D attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 

C. Vergil, Works, Life, and Literary Influence, with readings 
from the Eclogues and i^neid, VII-XII. Three hours per week. 
First half-year. 

Horace, Satires and Epistles. Three hours per week. Second 
half-year. 

D. Cicero, Letters and Orations, with particular reference to 
his political career and the public life of the times. Three hours 
per week. First half-year. 

Lyric Poetry, particularly the poems of Catullus. Three hours 
per week. Second half-year. 

E. Tacitus and the other prose writers of the Silver Age. His- 
tory and description of the Roman Government. Three hours 

per week. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

F. Selections from the Elegiac Writers of the Augustan Age 
and the chief poets of the Silver Age. More extended study 
of the History of Latin Literature. Three hours per week. 

LAW 
Dean Trickett 

A. Criminal Law, first two terms; Bailments, the third term. 
Open to members of the Junior class. Three hours per week. 

B. Real Property. Three hours per week. 

C. Contracts. Two hours per week. 

D. Courses B and C combined. Open to Seniors. Five hours 
per week. 

E. Torts, first two terms ; Domestic Relations, the third term. 
Three hours per week. 

MATHEMATICS 
Professor Landis and Adjunct Professor Craver 

A. Algebra, including Theory of Equations, Determinants, 
the Binomial Theorem, Choice, Logarithms, Interest and Annui- 
ties, etc. (Wentworth). Solid Geometry (Durell). Trig- 
onometry (Crockett). Four hours per week. 

B. Analytic Geometry. The conies and a discussion of the 
general equation of the second degree. (Fine and Thompson). 
Calculus. Differentiation, integration, maxima and minima, curve 
tracing, areas, lengths, volumes, centers of mass, etc. (Hulburt). 
Three hours per week. 

C. Calculus. Partial derivatives, curve tracing, evolutes, en- 
velopes. Taylor's Theorem, special methods of integration, etc. 
(Hulburt). Three hours per week, half-year. 

D. Differential Equations (Murray). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

E. Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions. The quadric 
surfaces and their more important properties, the general equation 



40 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



of the second degree, surfaces in general, and curves in space. 
(C. Smith.) Three hours per week, half-year. 



F. Projective Geometry (Cremona), 
half-year. 



Three hours per week, 



G. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Computation of annui- 
ties, net premiums, loading, etc. (Moir). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

H. Spherical Astronomy. Problems in latitude, longitude, 
time, etc. (Chauvenet and the American Ephemeris). Three 
hours per week, half-year. 

I. History and Teaching of Mathematics. A reading course 
in the works of Cantor, Ball, Cajori, Zeuthen, Klein, Smith, 
Young, Schultze, etc. Three hours a week, half-year. 

Courses in the Theory of Numbers, Theory of Functions, Cal- 
culus of Probabilities, and other subjects have been given, and 
will be given whenever it seems desirable. Courses A and B are 
given each year. Of the remaining courses two are given each 
year, so that every student may follow at least four of them, and 
the student who presents course A for entrance may pursue six 
of them. 

K. Astronomy. An Introduction to Astronomy (Moulton). 
Two hours per week. 



PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 
Professor Gooding and Mr. Carver 

B. Psychology. A brief review of the physiology of the 
nervous system is followed by a study of the more important 
phenomena of mental experience. The results of recent experi- 
mental psychology are taken up. No laboratory work is required 
but problems are offered for solution from the direct experience 
of the pupils. "James' Principles" (Briefer Course) and Colvin 
& Bagley's "Human Behavior" are used as texts. Three hours set 

week. 

E. Philosophy. The Introduction to Philosophy tonus the 
work of the first half-year, and the History <>t Philosophj the 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

second half. The texts used are Paulsen's "Introduction to Phil- 
osophy," Descartes' "Meditations," Berkeley's "Principles," and 
Hume's "Enquiry." Three hours per week. * 

F. Education. Methods of teaching elementary and sec- 
onday school subjects. Observation of Schools, Psychological 
Principles, and History of Education. Three hours per week. 

The Educational Code of Pennsylvania requires of college 
graduates applying for a provisional certificate two hundred edu- 
cational hours. These hours can be absolved by Courses B and F. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Director Craver 

The course in physical training is planned as a two year course. 
One hundred and twenty hours of work are required of all male 
students of the college, by the department during their first two 
years in college. 

During the early months of his connection with the college 
each student is subjected to a careful physical examination by the 
director. All physical defects are noted and corrective exercises 
suggested. 

The courses in physical training are as follows: 

I. Out door work — walking, running, jumping, etc., non-com- 
petitive. 

II. Out door work — competitive sports — football, baseball, 
track, tennis. 

III. Indoor work, calisthenics. 

IV. Indoor work — competitive games — basket ball, track ath- 
letics, gymnasium team. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Mohler 

A. Mechanics, Sound, Light and Electricity. Two demon- 
stration lectures or recitations per week. Text — Kimball's Col- 
lege Physics. 

B. A laboratory course to accompany Physics A. Exact meas- 
urements in Mechanics, Sound and Light. One period of two 
hours per week. 



42 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

C. Courses A and B combined. Three hours per week. 

D. Electricity, Light, and Heat. Three demonstration lec- 
tures or recitations per week. 

E. A laboratory course on Light, Heat, Electricity, and Pho- 
tography. One period of two hours per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. An advanced course in electrical measurement. Text — 
Franklin Crawford and McNutt. One period of two hours per 
week. 

Advanced laboratory work in Optics and Heat. Text — Mann's 
Advanced Optics. Courses as follows: 

H. Two hours per week, counting as one. 

I. Four hours per week, counting as two. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Professor Cole 

Fall term. Public Reading. Drill in articulation, pronuncia- 
tion, emphasis, pitch, inflection, pause, management of the voice, 
ease of bearing, gesture, etc. Once a week. 

Winter term. Public Speaking. Extemporaneous public speak- 
ing from outlines prepared in advance. Declamations. One from 
each student during the term. Once a week. 

Spring term. Debating. Extemporaneous and prepared de- 
bates, the former with the use of outlines prepared in advance. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor Cole 

French 

The instruction in this department aims mainly at such a knowl- 
edge of the language as will enable tin- Student to read the pi use 
and poetry <>t the seventeenth, eighteenth, ami nineteenth ecu 
tunes, without the necessity of translating, and with understand- 
ing and enjoyment. To tin's end, the "direct" method is employed, 
so far as conditions make it practicable, ami French is progres- 
sive! j the language «»t the class-room. Throughout the course, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 43 

persistent attention is given to pronunciation and sentence stress. 
There is a large amount of translation of easy sentences into 
French, and a still larger amount of question and answer in 
French on the texts read. Dictation exercises are frequent. 
Translation into English, at first in detail, aims primarily at 
making the meaning clear from the French point of view, and 
gradually gives place to question and answer in French, and to 
translation only of the difficulties and of new words and idioms. 

In Course A, the reading is largely nineteenth century prose. 
Some account is given of the authors read and of their place in the 
history of the literature. The reading in Course B is mainly from 
representative prose writers of the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies; but a considerable number of French lyrics are also read. 
Course C deals mainly, in class, with the great writers of the 
seventeenth century; it is supplemented by the reading, outside of 
class, of a considerable amount from modern writers. Courses B 
and C are intended to give a somewhat connected general view 
of the history of the literature during the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
and nineteenth centuries. 

A. Beginners' Course. Pronunciation. French Grammar. 
Conversation, Dictation. Practice in translating into English. 
Practice in writing French. This course is conducted partly in 
French. Three or four hours per week. 

B. Continues Course A. A considerable amount of outside 
reading is required. The work is conducted mainly in French. 
Four hours per week. 

C. Continues Course B. A large amount of outside reading 
is required. The work is conducted in French. Three hours per 
week. 

D. Is intended to give further practice in understanding 
spoken French, and in French conversation. The work is con- 
ducted in French. It is open to those who, in the judgment of 
the teacher, have had sufficient training in French to profit by 
the work. Two hours per week, counting as one. 

Italian 

A.* A rapid reading course, designed to enable the student to 
read and enjoy, without translation, modern Italian prose. Open 
only to those who have had two years of college German and 
French, or their equivalent. Two hours per week. 

*Spanish A, and Italian A, are given in alternate years. Spanish is 
given in 1914-15. 



U DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Spanish 

A.* A rapid reading course, designed to enable the student to 
read and enjoy, without translation, modern Spanish prose. Open 
only to those who have had two years of college German and 
French, or their equivalent. Two hours per week. 

♦Spanish A, and Italian A, are given in alternate years. Spanish is 
given in 1914-15. 



Material Equipment 

The campus of eight acres was purchased of the Penns, and com- 
prises a full square in the Borough of Carlisle. Upon and around 
it are grouped the principal of the following buildings: 

West College, "Old West," (1804), Y. M. C. A. Hall arid 
dormitories. 

East College (1836), dormitories. 

Tome Scientific Building (1884), Museum and departments of 
Chemistry and Physics. 

Bosler Hall (1885), Chapel, Library (30,000 volumes), and 
Reading Room. 

Denny Hall (1905), Biological Laboratories, recitation rooms, 
Literary Society halls and college administrative offices. 

Gymnasium (1884), large main room, running track, base ball 
cage, and bathing and dressing rooms. 

Metzger College, the dormitory for women, leaves little to be 
desired for its purpose. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Athletic Field of over 
six acres is admirably suited to its purpose. 

Seven fraternity houses are occupied by fraternity members. 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

The Library, available to all students under established regula- 
tions, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal in size — 
that of the college proper, which is exceedingly rich in old vol- 
umes and in reference books — and those of the Belles Lettres and 
Union Philosophical Societies accumulated by them during the 
century and a quarter of their existence. These three libraries 
are one in organization, by the registration of the books of all 
in a single catalogue, on the card plan, which renders books in any 
of the collections easily available. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, of 
Curwensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of starting a 
Library Fund, together with the cordial co-operation of the Alumni 
Library Guild, the college is able to make substantial additions, 
annually, to the resources of the Library. 

The reading-room in the Library is furnished with the best of 
reading-room appliances. Its files are supplied with representa- 
tives of the best secular and religious papers, while many of the 
best magazines and reviews are upon its tables. 

45 



General Regulations 

DEGREES 

The following degrees in cursu will be conferred by the col- 
lege on members of classes having entered college prior to 1912. 

Bachelor of Arts. — The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be con- 
ferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the Classi- 
cal course. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. — The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
will be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work 
of the Latin-Scientific and Philosophical courses. 

Bachelor of Science. — The degree of Bachelor of Science will 
be conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of the 
Scientific course. 

On students of classes having entered the college in September, 
19 1 2, or later, the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred on 
their completion of the Classical, Latin-Scientific, or Philosophical 
courses; and the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
on such students on their completion of the Scientific course. 

Master of Arts. — The degree of Master of Arts in cursu will 
be conferred on those graduates of the college who shall have 
completed a course of study prescribed by the professors in the 
several departments and approved by the Faculty, and who shall 
have passed a satisfactory examination thereon at the seat of the 
college. A charge of twenty dollars will be made for the examina- 
tion, one-half of which shall be payable when the student registers, 
which must be by October 15. Graduates of reputable colleges 
who complete in a satisfactory manner the course of the School of 
Law are eligible for the degree of Master of Arts, in cursu. Appli- 
cation for information respecting the Master's degree must be 
made in writing to Dr. B. O. Mclntire, Chairman of Committee 
on Graduate Work. 

N. B. — Graduates of classes entering the College in [915 or 
thereafter will be under different regulations with respect to the 
Master's degree, said regulations to be announced in a subsequent 
issue of the Catalogue. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Students are required to attend devotional services in the James 

\V. Bosler Memorial Librarj 1 1 all ever] morning, also the regu- 
lar morning preaching services "1 the churches the] elect. 

i<; 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 47 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

The government and discipline of the college are vested exclu- 
sively in the Faculty of the college, although the regulation of cer- 
tain functions which have particular reference to the life of the 
student-body is left largely to the determination of the students 
themselves. A copy of the Rules and Regulations, established by 
the Trustees for the government of the college and the ordering of 
her work, is placed in the hands of each student upon matricula- 
tion, and he or she is expected to meet the requirements of good 
morals and good citizenship. Failure to do this may result in sus- 
pension, dismissal, or expulsion. Suspended students are required 
to go to their homes, and parents or guardians are notified of the 
facts. 

Report of attention to college duties and of the deportment of 
each student is made at the close of each term to students per- 
sonally, if of legal years; otherwise to parents or guardians. Spe- 
cial reports will be sent out whenever deemed necessary by the 
Faculty. 

COLLEGE BILLS 

General charge to students, $125 OO 

Room-rent, $8 to 35 00 

Laboratory — Biological, Botanical, Chemical, Physical, 

Anatomical, or Zoological, each, 12 50 

Athletic charge, unanimously recommended by students, . . 8 00 
Charge for The Dickinsonian, unanimously recommended 

by students, I OO 

Students presenting scholarships will be credited on general 
charges for their face value. 

METZGER COLLEGE 

For ladies residing in Metzger College the total charge is $375 
per year, payable in three installments within ten days of the 
opening of each term, or within ten days of their arrival. This 
sum will cover all expenses for furnished rooms, bed-furnishing, 
lights, steam-heating, board ; everything, indeed, save personal 
laundry, books, and laboratory charges. All ladies non-residents 
of the town are expected to room in Metzger College. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS, REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

During the college year two bills are presented, one for the 
Fall term and the other covering the charges for the Winter and 
Spring terms combined. The Fall term bill is for two-fifths of the 



48 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

academic year, and the combined Winter and Spring term bill is 
for the remaining three-fifths. The latter may be paid in two in- 
stallments. 

The Fall term bill will be presented within the ten days fol- 
lowing the opening of the term. Payment is expected at once and 
will be required by the noon of October 15 following. 

The combined Winter and Spring term bill will be presented 
within ten days following the opening of the Winter term. Pay- 
ments is expected at once and will be required by the noon of 
January 25. If paid in two installments, the one for the Winter 
term and the other for the Spring term, payments must be made 
by January 25 and by April 15, respectively. 

When two students from the same family are present in the 
college at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent, is made. 

Students who room alone, are charged the full rent of the room. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent them- 
selves from college work for the whole or major portion of any 
term, and who present themselves for examination in said work, 
will be charged one-half of the regular rate for the period of their 
absence from college work, but no reduction on any term bill will 
be allowed for less than four weeks of continuous absence, for any 
cause, during any part of any term. For a period of continuous ab- 
sence in excess of four weeks, a reduction of one-half the pro rata, 
or weekly, charge will be allowed, provided the absence occurs 
through no fault of the student. 

N. B. — Every student connected with the college, and every 
student proposing entrance, will be required to show a receipt 
signed by the treasurer of the college for the sum of ten dollars 
before being admitted to the work of the class with which he is 
associated, the said sum to appear as a credit on the college bill for 
the Fall term. The same rule will be observed at the opening of 
the Winter term. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, or 
money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

Rooms. — The rooms in the college are secured to the students 
during term time only. The occupants of rooms are held account- 
able for any damage to them. Any student proved to be guilty of 
wilful destruction of, or damage to, college property, ma\ be re- 
quired to pay not only the cost of replacement, or repair, but also a 
fine as determined by the Faculty (not to exceed ten times the cost 
of repair), said fine to be placed to the credit side of the special 
damage account. When the students injuring property are un- 
known, the cost of repairs is assessed, toward the close of the col- 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 49 

lege year, upon the whole body of students, as a special damage ac- 
count. 

Failure to adjust college bills may result in exclusion from reci- 
tations, or from college, and no student can have honorable dis- 
missal, or certificate of advancement until his bills have been duly 
adjusted. 

GOWNS, HOODS, AND CAPS 

The college has adopted the regulations for academic caps and 
gowns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 1895. 

1. Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black- 
stuff gown of the Oxford shape, but with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting occa- 
sions a black-stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood lined with 
red silk, crossed by a chevron of white, six inches in breadth. 

3. Masters of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting oc- 
casions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for 
Bachelors. 

4. Doctors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting oc- 
casions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for 
Bachelors, trimmed around the exterior edge with a cord or with 
a band, not more than four inches wide, of silk, satin, or velvet, 
distinctive of the department to which the degree pertains, as fol- 
lows: Doctor of Literature, white; Doctor of Divinity, scarlet; 
Doctor of Laws, purple; Doctor of Philosophy, blue; Doctor of 
Science, gold-yellow. 

With the gown will be worn the Oxford cap, of serge for under- 
graduates and of broadcloth for graduates, with black tassels, ex- 
cept the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of velvet with 
tassels in whole or part of gold thread. 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, during 
their term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the doctor's de- 
gree, with the hood appropriate to the degree that they severally 
have received. Members of the Board of Trustees, or of the Fac- 
ulty, who have received degrees from other universities or col- 
leges, shall be entitled to wear the costume appropriate to the 
same degree from Dickinson College, so long as they shall retain 
their official connection with the college. The President of the 
college may adopt such distinctive costume or badge as he shall 
choose, not inconsistent with the foregoing regulations. 



College Organizations 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The Belles Lettres and the Union Philosophical Societies, purely 
literary in their character, nearly coeval with the college, have 
been maintained in continuous operation throughout most of its 
history; and Harman Society, the organization of the young ladies, 
was founded in 1896. Not the least of the advantages of college 
residence is the special training secured in these societies. The 
halls in which they meet, ample in size and thoroughly equipped, 
are hardly surpassed anywhere. For nearly twenty years the work 
and worth of these societies have been recognized in the following 
regulations: 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical con- 
test in connection with the college who shall not have been a 
member of one of the literary societies for at least three-fourths of 
the time of his or her connection with the college. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of 
Commencement Day who shall not have been a member of one of 
the literary societies for at least one-half of the time of his or her 
connection with the college. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the college who shall 
not have made satisfactory adjustment of financial obligations to 
the literary society of which he or she has been a member. 

BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY 

Officers: President — Everett E. Borton, '15. 
Vice-President — Wiluam W. Edel, '15. 
Recording Secretary — Charles R. Nickeas. '17. 
Corresponding Secretary — Robert E. Woodwakp, '17. 
Treasurer — George W. Bradley, '16. 
Critic— Robert C. Gates, '15. 
Clerk— Gaitiier P. WakEieed, '17. 
Chairman, Executive Committee- LESTER S. lli.eiir. '15 

UNION PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 

Officers: President -Walter W. Kisti.ek. '15. 
Vice-Presidenl Thomas V. Curran, '16 
Recording-Secretary— Reynolds C. Massey, '16. 
Corresponding Secretary I'm 1. Rogers, '16 

50 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 51 

Treasurer — Carl B. Shelley, '17. 
Censor— Donald B. Filler, '17. 
Critic — Robert B. Kistler, '15. 
Clerk — Delmer Robinson, '17. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Jacob M. Goodyear, '17. 

Executive Committee: Thomas V. Curran, 'i6; Clark L. Van 
Auken, '16; Charles H. Reitz, '16. 

HARMAN SOCIETY 

Officers: President — G. Winifred Evans, '15. 
Vice-President — Anna M. Shuey, '16. 
Secretary — Nora M. Mohler, '17. 
Treasurer — Anna M. MohlER, '17. 
Critic — Roberta Reiee, '15. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

These Associations in the college are well organized, and do a 
most useful work. A large number of the students are actively 
connected with them and are zealous to forward their work. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Elias B. Baker, '15. 
Vice-President — J. Luther Neee, '15. 
Corresponding Secretary — Hiester R. HornbeRGER, '15. 
Recording Secretary — Robert B. KistlER, '15. 
Treasurer — Robert C. Gates, '15. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Kathryn M. Hodgson, '15. 
Vice-President — Mabel A. Dexter, '15. 
Secretary — Ethel Wagg, '15. 
Treasurer — In a E. Mitchell, '15. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

The trustees, in 1891, ordered that the alumni be divided into 
four geographical districts, centering respectively in Baltimore, 
Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Carlisle, and that the alumni of 
each district elect a trustee, to be known as an Alumni Trustee, 
having all privileges of trustees of the college. These District 
Alumni Associations meet at such times as they may elect. There 
are also a General Alumni Association and various local associa- 
tions. 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President— Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D. 
Vice President — J. Henry Baker, Esq. 
Secretary — Montgomery P. Sellers. 
Treasurer — George L. Reed, Esq. 
Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

BALTIMORE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. 

First Vice-President — Rev. William D. Morgan. 

Second Vice-President — Carl F. New 

Treasurer — Rev. Martin L. Beall. 

Recording Secretary — Rev. John R. Edwards. 

Corresponding Secretary — William H. Davenport. 

Executive Committee — Hon. George R. Willis, Hon. Hammond 

Urner, G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D., M. S. Levy, Rev. J. Fred 

Heisse, D.D., Rev. Edward Hayes, D.D. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees — G. Lane Taneyhill, 

M.D. 
Address of Secretary, Garrett Building, South and German streets, 

Baltimore, Md. 

CARLISLE ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Alexander H. Ege. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 

Repiesentative in the Board of Trustees — Harry I. Huber, Esq. 

Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Henry C. Longneckkr, D.D.S. 
Vice-President— George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Thomas S. Lanard, Esq. 
Executive Committee — Boyd LEE Spahr, Esq.; Frysinger Evan-. 
; Charles k. Zuc, Esq.; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq.; Rev. 
Thomas W. Davis; William P. String. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees Charles J. Hepburn, 

Esq. 
Address <>f the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia Pa 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 53 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Hyman N. Levy. 

Vice-President— John E. Taylor, Esq. 
Secretary— Frederick S. Stitt, Esq. 
Treasurer — James Strayer, Esq. 

WILMINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — Rev. Elmer L. Cross, Ped.D. 
Vice-President — Hon. Thomas N. Rawlins. 

Executive Committee — Rev. Ralph T. Coursey; Henry P. Can- 
non. 
Representative in the Board of Trustees— Henry P. Cannon. 

DICKINSON CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY 

Officers: President — T. Leonard Hoover. 

Vice-President — Rippey T. Sadler, Esq. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Rev. J. Fred Laise. 

Executive Committee — L. Wellington Johnson, C. Grant Cleav- 
er, William K. Swartz, Thomas J. Towers, Esq.; Frank H. 
Hertzler. 

THE ALUMNI FUND COMMITEEE 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80; John M. 
Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. Boyer, Esq., '88; Charles J. Hepburn, 
Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq.., '93; William A. Jordan, Esq., '97; 
Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. Burchenal, Esq., '00; T. Leon- 
ard Hoover, '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00; George H. Bonner, Esq., 
'01; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Rev. Frank D. Lawrence, '02. 

Officers: Chairman— Henry P. Cannon, '70, Bridgeville, Del. 

Vice-Chairman — George D. Chenoweth, '68, Woodbury, N. J. 
Secretary — Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa. 
Treasurer — C. W. Prettyman, '91, Carlisle, Pa. 
Executive Committee — Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; T. 

Leonard Hoover, '00; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr., '02; Rev. Frank D. 

Lawrence, '02; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00, Secretary, 1242 Land 

Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



54 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

In September, 1886, the Alpha Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, the first in the State of Pennsylvania, was organized. 
Only students finally passed for graduation are eligible to mem- 
bership, and of these only those of high class standing or giving 
promise of unusual achievement. Graduates of former years, not 
below the first fourth of their classes, and men of eminence in pro- 
fessional life, are also eligible to membership. 

Officers: President — Henry F. Whiting. 
Vice-President — Mervin G. Fieeer. 
Secretary — John F. Mohler.. 
Treasurer — Forrest E. Craver. 

THE DICKINSON LIBRARY GUILD 

The Dickinson Library Guild, composed of alumni and friends 
of Dickinson College, is organized for the purpose of creating a 
permanent endowment for the College Library, and membership 
in the Guild consists of those who make an annual contribution 
to the endowment fund of the Library. The membership is of 
five classes, or groups, as follows: 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 
Class B, all who contribute from five to ten dollars per year. 
Class C, all who contribute three dollars per year. 
Class D, all who contribute two dollars per year. 
Class E, all who contribute one dollar per year. 

In accordance with the action of the Board of Trustees of the 
college, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the perma- 
nent endowment fund of the Library, the proceeds of which shall 
be devoted to the sole purpose of purchasing books by the Faculty 
Committee on Library. The current expenses of the organization 
shall be otherwise provided for. 

Directors: President — Bradford O. McIntirk. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Mervin G. Filler. 
John M. RhEY, ESQ., '83; J. KlKK BOSLER, ESQ., '07: ROBERT C 

Gates, '15. 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 

For some years the students in their organized capacity have ex- 
ercised limited government over some of their own internal inter- 
ests. Tliis student government has applied especially t<» relations 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

of one class with another, but has also influenced the life of the 
entire student-body. 

The student organization is called the Student Assembly, and 
the elected governing body is called the Senate. 

Senate: Elias B. Baker, '15; Ralph M. Bashore, '17 ', Lester S. 
Hecht, '15; Hiester R. Hornberger, '15; Thomas R. Jeffrey, 'i6; 
Robert R. Kisteer, '15; Edmund J. Koser, 'i8; George C. Moose, '16; 
J. Luther Neff, '15; David M. Wallace, '15 ; Cearence G. War- 
fieed, '15. 
Officers: President — Eeias B. Baker, 'i5- 

Vice-President — George C. Moose, 'i6. 

Secretary — Lester S. Hecht, '15. 

Treasurer — Hiester R. Hornberger. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

In the autumn of 1908 several of the more musically inclined 
students set on foot a movement whch has resulted in the present 
College Band. Originally simply a means of helping on the sing- 
ing at the football games, it has outgrown its original purpose and 
is now one of the regular musical organizations of the college. It 
furnishes the music for college functions, and frequently gives 
concerts on the campus. Any student with musical ability is eligi- 
ble to membership. Instruction is provided for beginners, and 
students are encouraged to take up this sort of work. 

Officers: President — Rowland B. Ingram, Law, '15, 
Director — W. Fred Burton, '17. 
Vice-President — Ralph M. Bashore, '17. 
Secretary — Harry L. Price, '17. 
Treasurer — Clark L. VanAuken, '16. 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Officers: President — James J. Wilson, Law, '15. 

Vice-President — Hiester R. Hornberger, '15. 

Secretary — Robert E. Woodward, '17. 

Treasurer — David M. Wallace, '15. 

Asst. Treasurer — George W. Bradley, '16. 

Advisory Committee — Prof. Henry M. Stephens, Chairman, Car- 
lisle; Prof. William W. Landis, Secretary, Carlisle; Prof. 
Forrest E. Craver, Carlisle ; Prof. Walter Harrison Hitchler, 
Carlisle; E. M. Biddle, Jr., Esq., Carlisle; J. Kirk Bosler. 



56 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Esq., Carlisle; Raphael S. Hays, Carlisle; Edward M. Biddle, 
Esq., Philadelphia; William D. Boyer, Esq., Scranton; Harry 
K. Hoch, Esq., Wilmington, Del.; Henry W. Story, Esq : , Johns- 
town. 

Football Manager — James E. Spitznas, '15. 

Baseball Manager — John H. Hemphill, Law, '15. 

Track Manager — C. Hammond Smith, '16. 

Manager Indoor Sports — Daniel F. Graham, '15. 

Captain Football Team — Hiester R. Hornberger, '15. 

Captain Baseball Team — E. Guerdon Potter, Law, '15. 

Captain Track Team — Clarence G. Warfield, '15. 

Captain Tennis Team — John H. Hemphill, Law, '15. 



Prizes, Scholarships, and Beneficiary Funds 

PRIZES 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improve- 
ment in composition and declamation at an early stage in the col- 
lege course, the literary societies have each instituted a yearly 
contest therein for their respective members from the Sophomore 
class. All the members of this class in the Belles Lettres Society 
have the option of competing, and a gold medal is awarded the 
contestant exhibiting the highest degree of excellence in the arts 
to which the competition relates, as decided by judges chosen by the 
society. 

Awarded to Raymond S. Michael, Harrisburg. 

The Cannon Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henry 
P. Cannon, of Bridgeville, Del., is awarded to that member of the 
Sophomore class who shall pass the most satisfactory examination 
in the Mathematics of the Sophomore year, together with the 
original Geometry of the Freshman year. 

Awarded to Ethel M. Schellinger, Green Creek, N. J. 

The Chi Omega Fraternity Prize of twenty-five dollars, the 
gift of the Dickinson chapter, to be awarded to the young woman 
student who excels in Sophomore Economics. First offered for 
year 1913-14- 

Awarded to Anna M. Shuey, Bellefonte. 

The Clemens Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the 
Rev. Joseph Clemens, '94, Chaplain, United States Army, is 
awarded annually to the student of the Junior class, proposing the 
work of the ministry, who writes the best essay, or sermon, upon 
some subject bearing upon the work of foreign missions, the essay 
or sermon not to exceed fifteen hundred words, and to be presented 
to the President of the college not later than May 1 of each year. 
A copy of the winning essay or sermon, in typewritten form, shall 
be forwarded to the donor of the prize. 

Awarded to William W. Edel, Baltimore, Md. 

The Dare Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the college, is 
awarded to that member of the graduating class of the Conway 
Hall Preparatory School who shall be found to have attained the 

57 



58 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

highest excellence in the studies preparatory to any course of 
Dickinson College. 

Awarded to Paul L. Hutchison, Carlisle. 

The Charles Mortimer Giffin Prize in English Bible.— This 
prize, established in memory of the Rev. Charles Mortimer Giffin, 
D.D., is based upon a fund contributed by his wife, and per- 
manently invested, the income of which shall be used as an 
award for work done under suitable conditions in the study of 
The English Bible by a young man who may be a member of 
either the Junior or Senior class. One of the conditions govern- 
ing the award shall be the writing of a competitive essay, and that 
one being adjudged the best for comprehensiveness of survey, in- 
dependence of judgment, and excellence of style shall be given 
the prize. A typewritten copy of the prize-winning essay shall be 
furnished to the donor. 

First offered 1913-14. 

Awarded to William W. Edel, Baltimore, Md. 

The Jackson Scholarship Prizes, two in number, of fifty 
dollars each, established by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jackson, of Ber- 
wick, Pa., in memory of her husband, the late Col. Clarence Gear- 
hart Jackson, are awarded annually to students entering from 
Williamsport Dickinson Seminary who have attained the highest 
rank in scholarship, the scholarships to be good for the Freshman 
year only. 

The Johnson Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph H. 
Johnson, '05, of Milton, Pa., is awarded to that one of the liter- 
ary societies of the college whose members shall excel in debate, 
said debate to be conducted according to the terms proposed by 
the Faculty, and adopted by the respective societies. 

Awarded to the Union Philosophical Society, represented by 
Lester W. Auman, Mifflintown ; Charles C. Cole, Altoona. and 
Harry E. Brumbaugh, Greencastle. 

The King Scholarship Prize is awarded annually to the 
graduate of the high school, Washington, D. C, selected by the 
principal for excellence in the studies preparatory to entrance in 
Dickinson College, the scholarship to W enjoyed during the Fresh- 
man year only. 

N01 awarded, [914. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

The McDaniel Prizes. — Delaplaine McDaniel, Esq., late of 
Philadelphia, provided for the founding of certain scholarships, 
to be awarded on the ground of excellence in scholarship. The 
sum of five thousand dollars was given the college in trust, 
with provision that three prizes, equal in amount, be constituted 
from the annual income, and offered yearly to be competed for 
by the members of the Freshman and Sophomore classes, and with 
provision, further, that, two of these prizes be awarded, one each, 
to the two members of the former class, and the remaining prize to 
the member of the latter class who in such way as the authorities of 
the college prescribe, attain the highest average of excellence in 
the work of these classes respectively. 

Freshman class — First prize to Nora M. Mohler, Carlisle. 
Second prize to Robert E. Woodward, Fort Ituachua, Arizona. 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Charles H. Reitz, Mt. Carmel. 

The Miller Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles 
O. Miller, Esq., of Stamford, Conn., is awarded to that member 
of the Freshman class who shall excel in forensic declamation. 

Awarded to Homer M. Respess, Baltimore, Md. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes, four in number, of 
twenty-five dollars each, one for each of the college classes, offered 
by the late Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a memorial to 
his father, Gen. John Patton, for many years a faithful friend and 
trustee of the college, are awarded according to conditions estab- 
lished for the Patton Scholarship Prizes maintained for many years 
by his honored father. 

Senior class — Divided between Samuel L. Mohler, Carlisle, and 
Rachael S. Beam, Carlisle. 

Junior class — Divided between Kathryn M. Hodgson, Felton, 
Del., and Hiester R. Hornberger, Sinking Spring. 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Anna M. Shuey, Bellefonte. 

Freshman class — Divided between Fred P. Corson, Millville, 
N. J., and Homer M. Respess, Baltimore, Md. 

The Pierson Prizes for oratory, established by Daniel Pierson, 
Esq., of Newark, N. J., gold and silver medals, are offered each 
year to be competed for by members of the Junior class in a public 
oratorical contest, which contest has for years been placed among 
the exercises of Commencement week. 

Gold Medal— Robert B. Kistler, Minersville. Silver Medal- 
William W. Edel, Baltimore, Md. 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Rees Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the Rev. Milton 
S. Rees, D.D., Rochester, N. Y., is awarded to that student who 
shall excel in English Bible. 

Awarded to Russell C. McElfish, Chaneysville. 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize of fifty dol- 
lars, the gift of General James Fowler Rusling, LL.D., '54, 
Trenton, N. J., is awarded to that member of the Senior class who, 
at the end of a four years' course, shall be found to excel in schol- 
arship and character, as determined by the Faculty. 

Awarded to Samuel L. Mohler, Carlisle. 

The Smith Prize of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert Hays 
Smith, '98, of San Francisco, Cal., is awarded as a second prize, 
to be distributed equally among the members of the winning team 
in the annual Inter-society debate. 

Awarded to the winners of the Johnson prize above — Lester W. 
Auman, Charles C. Cole, and Harry E. Brumbaugh. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. — As an incentive to im- 
provement in composition and declamation at an early stage in 
the college course, the literary societies have each instituted a 
yearly contest therein for their respective members from the Sopho- 
more class. All the members of this class in the Union Philosophi- 
cal society have the option of competing, and a gold medal is 
awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest degree of excellence 
in the arts to which the competition relates, as decided by judges 
chosen by the society. 

Awarded to Leonard G. Hagner, Wilmington, Del. 

The Wagg Prize, a gold medal, the gift of A. H. Wagg, '09, 
of New York, will be awarded to that member of the class in 
American History who shall present the best competitive essay on 
an assigned subject pertaining to the life and public services oi 
some distinguished American closely related to Dickinson College 
as founder, trustee, executive, professor, or alumnus. 

Awarded to Robert C. Gates, Renovo. 

The Walkley Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of \V. R. Walk- 
ley, D.C.L., in memory of His only son, Winfield Davidson Walk 
ley, who died March 11, [903, is awarded as a seeoinl prize to 

that member <»t the Freshman class who shall excel in decla- 
mation, cither forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Michael F. Davis, I'atontow n. \. J. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 61 

BENEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of funds and scholarships have been established in 
various ways by friends of education in general and of the college 
in particular, and are awarded largely by the donors or by the 
president to such students as may be in need of financial help. It 
is doubtful whether the same amount of money expended in any 
other way would accomplish a greater service in the cause of 
education than these small sums used to supplement the insufficient 
means at the command of worthy young people seeking an educa- 
tion. It is hoped that their number may be largely increased by 
men and women concerned to do good with their means. 

The Alumni Loan Fund of fifty dollars, contributed by an 
alumnus, to be loaned from year to year to students in need of 
temporary help, to be repaid within a year and again loaned. 

Baltimore Medical College Scholarship, tuition and exami- 
nation fees, to be available for the appointee for the first year of 
his four years' course in the medical school. 

The Bodine Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by George 
I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Arthur Milby Burton Scholarship of fifty dollars, es- 
tablished by Miss Mary R. Burton, for the education of worthy 
young men for the ministry, preference being given to applicants 
residing within the limits of the Philadelphia Conference. 

The Chandler Scholarship of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
D. Harry Chandler, of Vineland, N. J. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship of 
fifty dollars established by Mrs. Emma L. Keen, of Philadelphia, 
as a memorial to her father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, is awarded 
annually to young men preparing for the ministry. 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, 
of New York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, students 
from New York City and vicinity having prior claim. 

The J. W. Feight Memorial Scholarship, the interest on 
one thousand dollars, was established by J. W. Fisher, Esq., of 
Newport, Tenn., in loving memory of the character and services 
of the Reverend J. W. Feight, formerly of the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The fol- 
lowing conditions are observed in its award : First, the recipient 



62 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

shall, if possible, be from within the bounds of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference ; if from any other territory, that of the 
Baltimore Conference shall be preferred. Second, the award 
shall be, so far as possible, in the form of a loan, to be returned 
as soon as possible after graduation, interest on the loan to begin 
two years after the date of graduation. 

The Freeman Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by 
Frank A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, interest on one 
thousand dollars, the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of 
John Gillespie, Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her 
father. 

The Mary Louise Huntington Fund, the gift of Miss Mary 
Louise Huntington, of Brooklyn, N. Y., is used to aid young men 
of limited means who are preparing for missionary, ministerial, or 
educational work. 

The Lockyer Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by 
Mark B. Lockyer, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Theodore F. Miller Scholarship of fifty dolars, the gift 
of Theodore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Valeria Schall Scholarship of twenty-five dollars is used 
in assisting such young men as, in the estimation of the President 
and Faculty of the college, are of good character, scholarly habits, 
and deserving of assistance, and who are approved candidates for 
the Christian minstry. 

The Charles T. Schoen Scholarships, ten in number, of 
fifty dollars each, established by Charles T. Schoen, Esq., of 
Philadelphia, are awarded annually to such young men and wom- 
en as may be designated by the donor or by the President. 

The A. Herr Smith Scholarship, endowed, averaging one 
hundred dollars per year, is the gift of the late Miss Eliza E. 
Smith, of Lancaster, in memory of her brother, the Late Hon. A. 
1 1 err Smith. 

The Cornelia Thumm Scholarship, the annual interest on 
nine hundred and fifty dollars, the Legacy of the Late Mrs. Coi 
nelia A. Thumm, of Philadelphia, is used to aid such students as 
mas be designated by the President. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 63 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship of fifty dollars, es- 
tablished by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is 
awarded annually to such students as may be designated by the 
donor or by the President. 

The Rev. William Wood Scholarship of fifty dollars, the 
gift of Miss Sarah Wood, of Trenton, N. J., is awarded annually 
to such students as may be designated by the donor or by the 
President. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The trustees have authorized the founding of endowed scholar- 
ships of one thousand dollars each, whose object is to aid 
in extending the privileges of the college to young men of promise 
otherwise unable to command them. 

Such scholarships may be constituted as follows: 

1. The donor of each scholarship shall have the privilege of 
naming it, and of prescribing the conditions on which it shall be 
awarded. 

2. Scholarships may be maintained by the annual payment of 
fifty dollars, as interest, until the principal sum of one thousand 
dollars is paid. They lapse, of course, when the interest fails, 
unless the principal or interest on the same has been paid. 

3. Churches contributing one thousand dollars each, may, if 
they desire it, place upon that foundation the sons of their minis- 
ters, or, in lieu of that, may nominate some other candidate to re- 
ceive its avails. 

BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Dickinson College, in 
the County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars ; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof 

shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following. 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in the 
County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land 

and premises, that is to say , to have and to 

hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its suc- 
cessors and assigns, forever. 



64 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, 
or knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the 
President of the college, Carlisle, Pa., and, if practicable, to en- 
close a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes of the testators 
may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, 
or the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endow- 
ment of a scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of 
the same in the will provision. 



THE 

Dickinson School of Law 

OF 

DICKINSON COLLEGE 




Founded 1834; Reorganized 1890 



Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
1914-1915 






ESTABLISHMENT OF SCHOOL 

One of the earliest Schools of Law in the United States was 
established at Carlisle, in the year 1834, by Hon. John Reed, then 
President Judge of the courts of Cumberland County, Pa. This 
school, while under his immediate supervision, was regarded as a 
department of Dickinson College, his name appearing as Professor 
of Law in the Faculty of that institution. The College conferred 
the degree of LL.B. upon the graduates of the school. After Judge 
Reed's death, Hon. James H. Graham was elected to the Profes- 
sorship of Law in the College, and gave instruction to such of its 
students — and others — as desired to pursue the study of law. 
With his death, in 1882, the science of law ceased to be repre- 
sented in the courses of the College. 

At the adjourned meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Col- 
lege, held in Philadelphia, Thursday, January 9, 1890, the Presi- 
dent and Executive Committee were unanimously authorized to 
re-establish the School of Law. 

Application was accordingly made to the Court of Common 
Pleas of Cumberland County, Pa., for a charter, which, on the 
10th of February, 1890, was granted by that court, through Hon. 
Charles A. Barnett, specially presiding. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 67 

INCORPORATORS 

Hon. Wilbur F. Sadler, President, Carlisle 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

William Trickett, LL.D Carlisle 

(Dean of Dickinson School of Law) 

Hon. S. Leslie Mestrezat, LL-D Uniontown 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court) 

Hon. John P. Elkin Indiana 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court) 

Hon. John Stewart, LL-D Chambersburg 

(Associate Justice of the Supreme Court) 

Hon. Charles W. Stone Warren 

Hon. Gustav A. Endlich, LL.D Reading 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon. James W. Lee Pittsburgh 

Hon. George B. Orlady, LL.D Huntingdon 

(Judge of the Superior Court) 

Hon. William U. Hensel, LL.D Lancaster 

Hon. Charles N. Brumm Pottsville 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Robert McMeen, Esq Mifflintown 

Hon. Thomas H. Murray Clearfield 

Hon. William U. Brewer Chambersburg 

Hon. Edward W. BiddlE Carlisle 

N. Milton Woods, Esq Lancaster 

Hon. Walter S. Lyon Pittsburgh 

Hon. Lucien W. Doty Greensburg 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon. John W. Bittinger York 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon. Samuel McC. Swope Gettysburg 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon. Clinton R. Savidge Sunbury 

Hon. John W. Reed Brookville 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

John L. Shelley, Esq Mechanicsburg 

Hon. Robert W. Archbald, LL.D Scranton 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq., Carlisle 

William D. Boyer, Esq Scranton 

Hon. John P. Kelly Scranton 

Hon. W. F. Bay Stewart York 

Lewis S. Sadler, Esq Carlisle 

Samuel W. Kirk, Esq McConnellsburg 

Sylvester B. Sadler, Esq Carlisle 

Millard F. Thompson, Esq Carlisle 

Hon. Charles B. Staples Stroudsburg 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 



68 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Hon. James W. Shull New Bloomfield 

William A. Jordan, Esq Pittsburgh 

Walter K. Sharpe, Esq Chambersburg 

Hon. George Kunkel Harrisburg 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon. Joseph W. Bouton Smethport 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Isaac McCureEY, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Harry H. Mercer, Esq Mechanicsburg 

Hon. Henry A. Fuller Wilkes-Barre 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq Philadelphia 

J. Banks Kurtz, Esq Altoona 

A. A. Stevens, Esq Tyrone 

Mayer Sulzberger Philadelphia 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Charles C. Greer, Esq Johnstown 

Robert Hays Smith, Esq California 

Hon. John K. Tener Harrisburg 

Hon. Fred D. Moser Shamokin 

(Judge of Court of Common Pleas) 

Hon John W. Kephart Ebensburg 

(Judge of the Superior Court) 

Caleb S. Brinton, Esq Carlisle 

OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

President — Wilbur F. Sadler 
Treasurer — William Trickett. 
Secretary — Paul Willis. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 69 



FACULTY 

WILLIAM TRICKETT, LL.D. 

DEAN, AND PROFESSOR OE THE LAW OE EVIDENCE 

THE HONORABLE WILBUR FISK SADLER, A.M. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE, NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT 
PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

SYLVESTER BAKER SADLER, A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF CRIMINAL LAW 

A. J. WHITE HUTTON, A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF LAW OF DECEDENTS' ESTATES AND PARTNERSHIP 

JOSEPH PARKER McKEEHAN, A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS 

FRANCIS BENJAMIN SELLERS, Jr., A.M., LL.B. 

PROFESSOR OF PRACTICE 

WALTER HARRISON HITCHLER, B.L. 

PROFESSOR OF EQUITY 

ROBERT W. LYMAN, D.CL. 

PROFESSOR OF LAW OF REAL PROPERTY 



70 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE SCHOOL OF LAW 
LL.B.— BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Davis, J. Steward 
Dzwonczyk, Paul M. 
Ferrio, George, Jr. 
Fine, John S. 
Fry, Clarence A. 
Glauser, Wileis K. 
Koeb, Harry A. 
McCann, Gerald A. 
Means, George W., Jr. 
O'Rorke, James H. 
Poweee, D. Gayeord 
Price, David W. 
Reese, Arthur L. 



Renard, Louis E. 
Renn, Paul R. 
Sasscer, Lansdale G. 
Sharp, Clarence W. 
Shearer, Rippey T. 
Shoecraft, Eugene C. 
Snyder, Clinton T. 
Sohn, Walter R. 
Steckel, Harvey H. 
Strite, Edwin D. 
Surran, William B. 
Tobias, Walter M. 
Watkins, William D. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 71 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 
First, or Junior Year 

Criminal Law. — Walter H. Hitchler. First term, three hours 
per week. Clark's Criminal Law; Stephen's History of the 
Criminal Law ; Beale's Cases on Criminal Law. 

Real Property. — William Trickett and Robert W. Lyman. 
Both terms, two hours per week. Tiffany on Real Property; 
Gray's Cases; Finch's Cases. 

Torts. — Joseph P. McKeehan. First term and half of second 
term, three hours per week. Burdick on Torts; Ames' and 
Smith's Cases; Selected Pennsylvania Cases. 

Contracts. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Both terms, two hours per 
week. Clark on Contracts ; Huffcut and Woodruff's Cases. 

Domestic Relations. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, 
three hours per week. Long's Domestic Relations ; Selected 
Pennsylvania Cases. 

Bailments. — Walter H. Hitchler. Second term, three hours 
per week. Hale on Bailments; Goddard's Cases on Bailments; 
McClain's or Beale's Cases on Carriers. 

Moot Court. — Four times per week throughout the second 
term. 

Second, or Middle Year 

Equity. — Walter H. Hitchler. First term and part of second 
term, four hours per week. Bispham's Equity with Cases; Ames' 
Cases. 

Agency. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, three hours per 
week. Huffcut on Agency; Huffcut's Cases. 

Pleading. — Walter H. Hitchler. Latter part of second term, 
two hours per week. Martin's Common Law Pleading. 

Decedents' Estates. — A. J. White Hutton. Both terms, three 
hours per week. 

Sales of Personal Property. — Joseph P. McKeehan. First 
term, three hours per week. Tiffany on Sales; Selected Cases on 
Sales. 

Evidence. — William Trickett. Both terms, two hours per 
week. Greenleaf 's Evidence ; Selected Pennsylvania Cases ; Wig- 
more's Cases. 

General Jurisprudence. — William Trickett. Second term, 
three hours per week. Holland ; Markby. 

Damages. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second term, two hours 
per week. Sedgwick on Damages ; Beale's Cases on Damages. 



72 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Blackstone. — Joseph P. McKeehan. Second half of term, 
three hours per week. 

Practice. — Francis B. Sellers, Jr. Both terms, two hours per 
week. 

Moot Court. — Four times per week throughout the year. 

Third, or Senior Year 

Corporations. — William Trickett. First and part of second 
term, three hours per week. Clark on Corporations; Wilgus's 
Cases on Corporations. 

Constitutional Law. — William Trickett. First term, two 
hours per week. Cooky's Constitutional Law ; McClain's Cases 
on Constitutional Law. 

Constitution of Pennsylvania. — William Trickett. Second 
term, two hours per week for eight weeks. 

Bills and Notes. — William Trickett. Second term, two hours 
per week. Norton on Bills and Notes; Ames' Cases. 

Partnership. — A. J. White Hutton. First term, two hours per 
week. Gilmore on Partnership ; Ames' Cases on Partnership. 

Insurance. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, two hours 
per week for eight weeks. Richards on Insurance. 

Quasi-Contracts. — A. J. White Hutton. First term, two 
hours per week. Keener on Quasi-Contracts; Keener's Cases on 
Quasi-Contracts. 

Bankruptcy. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, six weeks, 
tv/o hours per week. Williston's Cases. 

Patents. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, six weeks, two 
hours per week. 

International Law. — William Trickett. Both terms, one 
hour per week. 

Practice. — Francis B. Sellers, Jr. Both terms, three hours per 
week. 

Landlord and Tenant. — A. J. White Hutton. Second term, 
two hours per week for eight weeks. 

Moot Court. — William Trickett. Both terms, tour times per 
week. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

Text-hooks have not been abandoned. The work of Black- 
stone, Story, Kent, Pollock, Anson, Lindley, Rest, Cooley, and of 
competent authors who have written more especiall] for students, 
is not believed to be useless. On the contrary, the careful study 
(it theii treatises Is prescribed. Nor is the studj of cases neglected. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 73 

Their assiduous perusal is constantly required. Cases apposite to 
the various topics are called to the notice of the student, who is 
expected carefully to study them and show the results of his in- 
vestigation in the class room. The frequent moot courts require 
the same examination and comparison of cases that the lawyer finds 
necessary. 

Cases are not discarded, because the opinions of the judges take 
pains explicitly to state the principles on which their judgments are 
founded. The best opinions of the greatest judges do this — witness 
Gray's Cases on Property, or any other good selection — but it is 
felt that to forbid their use by students, lest the latter, finding the 
Drinciples distinctly enounced by the writers of the opinions, 
should neglect to induct them for themselves, would be too heavy 
a sacrifice to make to a theory of legal education founded largely 
on a misconception of the nature of the inductive method. 

In most of the departments, a portion of the text-book is as- 
signed for reading and reflection, together with cases which sup- 
port, qualify and explain its propositions. When the students 
meet they are examined on the topics embraced in the lesson. Their 
comprehension of the principles of the text is tested. Obscurities 
are cleared up. The facts and law of the cases are considered. 
Students are above all trained to think. 

Practice is emphasized. The actions at common law are taken 
up and studied seriatim, their functions explained, the procedure in 
each described and illustrated step by step. Papers used in actual 
causes are, as far as possible, employed for models and illustra- 
tions. Thus the diligent student acquires before graduation a 
thorough comprehension of the actions of assumpsit, replevin, tres- 
pass, ejectment, partition, dower, etc., and is able to institute and 
conduct them through all the stages to execution. Similar instruc- 
tion is imparted with respect to bills in equity, and the proceedings 
in the Orphans' Court, the Court of Quarter Sessions and of Oyer 
and Terminer, and before justices of the peace. An aim of the 
course is to put in the power of a student the acquisition not of the 
theory of the law merely, but of the knowledge of practice, such as 
is not attained by any other method. 

Students, through the courtesy of the officers, are made familiar 
with the offices of the court, and the various records kept in them. 

Offices and Moot Courts 

Offices are maintained in the school, corresponding with those of 
Justices of the Peace, the Prothonotary, the Register of Wills, the 
Clerk of the Orphans' Court, the Clerk of the Criminal Courts, 
and the Recorder of Deeds. 



74 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Students are appointed from time to time to fill these offices. 
The officers thus appointed maintain the customary books of record, 
making all appropriate entries. Praecipes are filed, writs of sum- 
mons made and served, declarations and pleas are entered and 
causes put at issue. The decisions in Moot Courts are perma- 
nently filed in these offices. In the same way the work of the 
Register of Wills is exactly reproduced in the Probate of Wills, 
the grant of Letters of Administration, and in the passing of the 
accounts of Executors and Administrators. 

Moot Courts are held several times each week, in which a 
student sits as Judge, and students representing the respective 
sides present their points and arguments. Each student dur- 
ing the first and second years participates in a case at least once 
every month, and during the third year more frequently. Actions 
are instituted by the students, and conducted through all the 
stages of pleading down to judgment and execution. In a word, 
the harmonious blending of theory and practice is in all cases per- 
sistently sought. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Admission of Students 

Applications for admission must be made to William Trickett, 
Dean. 

Candidates for admission to the school will be received ( i ) on 
the presentation of the diploma of a college, or of a more ad- 
vanced public high school, normal school, seminary or academy, 
whose course embraces the studies required by the rule of the Su- 
preme Court for registration as a student of law (See below, "Reg- 
istration in Pennsylvania") ; (2) on the presentation of a cer- 
tificate showing that the applicant has successfully passed the Su- 
preme Court preliminary examination, and (3) on examination. 
Satisfactory evidence of the grade of the school, seminary or acad- 
emy from which the student comes, and of its curriculum, must, it 
necessary, be furnished. If the applicant has no diploma of the in- 
stitutions named, it will be necessary tor him to undergo an ex- 
amination upon the studies prescribed for registration by the Su- 
preme Court. 

REGISTRATION IN PENNSYLVANIA 

The following are the studies prescribed bj the State Board 

<>t Law Examiners, tor applicants for registration as students ot 

law : 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 75 

English — 

i. No candidate will be accepted in English whose work on any 
subject is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, idiom, or divi- 
sion into paragraphs. 

2. A short essay will be required to be written on a subject to 
be announced at the examination. 

3. The applicant must have read the following works, and must 
be able to pass a satisfactory examination upon the subject-matter, 
the style and structure thereof, and to answer simple questions on 
the lives of the authors. Shakespeare's Hamlet and Merchant of 
Venice, The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers in the Spectator, Scott's 
Heart of Mid-Lothian, Thackeray's Henry Esmond, first three 
books of Milton's Paradise Lost, Longfellow's Evangeline, Burke's 
Speech on Conciliation with America, Burke's Letter to the Sher- 
iffs of Bristol, Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Cooper's Last 
of the Mohicans, Webster's Reply to Hayne, Hawthorne's Marble 
Faun. 

4. The applicant must also have such knowledge of the general 
history of English literature (including that of the United States) 
as can be obtained from a good standard text-book upon this sub- 
ject. 

History — 

1. Outlines of Universal History. — Myers' Ancient His- 
tory, and Myers' Mediaeval and Modern History or other equiva- 
lent works are recommended to those students who have not had 
the advantage of advanced academic instruction. 

2. English History. — With special reference to social and po- 
litical development. Students who have not had the advantage of 
advanced academic instruction should make a careful study of 
Montgomery's Leading Facts of English History, or Ransome's 
Short History of England, or Higginson and Channing's English 
History for Americans, or some other equivalent work; and all ap- 
plicants are expected to read Green's Short History of the English 
People. 

3. American History. — This will include Colonial history 
with a view to the origin and early development of our institutions ; 
the story of the Revolution and of the formation and adoption of 
the Federal Constitution; and the political and social history of 
the United States, down to the present time. 

Students who have not had the advantage of advanced academic 
instruction should carefully study Channing's Students' History of 
the United States, or Johnstone's History of the United States for 
Schools, or Thomas' History of the United States, or some other 



76 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

equivalent work; and all applicants for examination are expected 
to read a good general history of the United States, Fisk's Dutch 
and Quaker Colonies in America, Parkman's Montcalm and 
Wolfe, Fiske's The Critical Period of American History. 

Latin — 

(a) First four books of Caesar's Commentaries. 

(b) First six books of Vergil's i^neid. 

(c) First four Orations of Cicero against Cataline.. 

This examination will include a general knowledge of the sub- 
ject-matter, history, geography and mythology of (a) and (b) ; sight 
translations from the above works and sight translations taken at 
large from Vergil and Cicero adapted to the proficiency of those 
who have studied the prescribed works. 

The student will also be required to render into Latin a short 
passage of English based on the first book of Caesar's Commentaries. 

Mathematics — 

Arithmetic. — A thorough practical knowledge of ordinary 
arithmetic. A careful training in accurate computation with whole 
numbers and fractions should form an important part of this work. 

Algebra. — Through quadratics. 

Geometry. — The whole of Plane Geometry as included in 
Wentworth's Geometry or any other standard text-book. 

Modern Geography — 

The student will be expected to have an accurate knowledge of 
the political and physical geography of the United States and such 
a knowledge of the political and physical geography of the rest of 
the earth as can be obtained from a careful study of the ordinary 
text-books of the schools. 

Examinations 

Besides the scrutiny to which the student submits in the daily 
recitation, he is subjected at certain stages in the study of a subject 
to an examination covering the field traversed. The examination 
is oral or written — or both, according to the subject-matter. The 
examinations, together with punctuality and industry in the dis- 
charge of the daily work of the school, arc of decisive effect upon 
graduation. 

Material Equipment 
The building in which the school is held is devoted to no other 

uses. Heated bj steam, well lighted and ventilated, and In the 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 77 

liberality of the late William C. Allison, Esq., of Philadelphia, put 
in thorough repair, it is well adapted to its purposes. 

Library 

The library of the school is well adapted to the needs of the stu- 
dent. Already large, it is yearly growing. It is in a commodious, 
well lighted and heated room, with ample table accommodations. 
But very few lawyers in the State have ready access to so large and 
well selected a number of text-books and decisions. A few years 
ago a generous gift from the late Mrs. Mary Cooper Allison, of 
Philadelphia, made it possible to double the then existing collection, 
and it has since been largely increased. The library is open daily 
from 8 A. M. to 10 p. M. No fee is charged for the use of it. 

Besides the law library, the students of the school are allowed to 
have the use of the books found in the rich collections of the Col- 
lege, on compliance with the usual conditions. 

The Site of the School 

Carlisle, situated in the beautiful and salubrious Cumberland 
Valley, seventeen miles from Harrisburg, is but three hours from 
Philadelphia and Baltimore, four from Washington, and six from 
New York. 

Special Privileges 

The college libraries, lectures, athletic field, gymnasium, board- 
ing clubs, and dormitories are accessible to the students of the Law 
School. They are allowed also to pursue special studies in the 
College, e. g., Latin, German, History, Political Economy. 

Court Privileges 

The court privileges are unusual. For nine weeks of the school 
year jury trials are held, and many argument courts in the intervals. 
Students are assigned seats, from which they can easily see, hear, 
and note what transpires. The offices are open to their examina- 
tion. Special preparation upon the cases before trial makes the 
actual watching of their evolution before the court and jury much 
more serviceable than it could otherwise be. 

Degrees 

Students satisfactorily completing the prescribed course will re- 
ceive the degree of LL.B. 

By act of the Board of Trustees of Dickinson College in June, 
1896, graduates of reputable colleges who shall complete in a sat- 



78 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

isfactory manner the course of the School of Law may have con- 
ferred on them, by the authority of the said Board, the degree of 
Master of Arts in cursu. Recipients of the degree will be charged 
the usual diploma fee of five dollars. 

Expenses 

For tuition during the short term the charge is $46, and during 
the long term $58.25. These must be paid at the opening of the 
term. The names of those who are in default may be dropped 
from the rolls at any time. For the final examination and diploma 
$10 will also be charged. 

Rooms may be had in the College at reasonable rates, varying 
with their situation and desirableness, or may be found in the town. 
Boarding in the college clubs costs from $2.75 to $3.50 per week, 
and in families of the town from $3.00 to $4.00. The total ex- 
penses of a student for tuition, boarding and lodging need not ex- 
ceed $275 per year. 

Terms and Vacations 

The school year is divided into two terms, the first commenc- 
ing on the third Wednesday of September, and the second on the 
first Wednesday following January 1st. The first session term- 
inates with the Winter vacation, which begins three days before 
Christmas. The second session ends with the Commencement of 
Dickinson College, i. e., on Wednesday, June 9. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Rule of the Supreme Court 

Rule 1. No person shall be admitted to practice as an attorney 
in this court except upon the recommendation of the State Board 
of Law Examiners. 

Rule 2. Any applicant for admission to the bar of this court 
who, on the first Monday of January, 1903, was a member of the 
bar of a court of common pleas of this Commonwealth, and after 
he shall have practiced therein for at least two years, maj be ad- 
mitted, without examination, upon the certificate of the State 
Board of Law Examiners; and no such candidate shall be re- 
quired to advertise or pay an\ fee tor reporting upon his creden- 
tials. 

Rule 3. No person shall he registered as a student at law for 

the purpose ot becoming entitled to admission to the bar oi tin 

Supreme Court until he shall have satisfied the State Hoard of 
l.;m Examiners that he is of good moral character, and shall haw 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 79 

received an academic degree from some college or university 
approved for that purpose by the court, or shall have passed 
a preliminary examination upon the following subjects: I. 
English Language and Literature; 2. Outlines of Universal His- 
tory; 3. History of England and of the United States; 4. Arith- 
metic, Algebra through Quadratics, and Plane Geometry; 5. 
Modern Geography ; 6. The first four books of Caesar's Commen- 
taries, the first six books of the i^neid, and the first four orations 
of Cicero against Cataline. 

Every candidate shall pay the State Board a fee of $25 
and, upon receiving a certificate recommending his registration and 
certifying that he is qualified to begin the study of the law, shall 
cause his name, age, place of residence, and the name of his pre- 
ceptor, or the law school in which he proposes to pursue his studies, 
to be registered with the Prothonotary of the Supreme Court for 
the district to which his county belongs. 

Rule 4. Candidates for admission, who have spent at least 
three years after registration in the study of the law, either by 
attendance upon the regular course of a law school, offering at 
least a three years' course, eight months in the year, and an aver- 
age of ten hours per week each year, or partly in a law school and 
partly in the office of a practicing attorney, or by the bona fide 
service of a regular clerkship in the office of a practicing attorney, 
shall be eligible to appear for examination for admission to the 
bar of this court upon complying with the following requirements : 

1. A candidate must advertise his intention to apply for admis- 
sion in a law periodical or a newspaper designated by the Board, 
and published within the judicial district within which he shall 
have pursued his studies and in the Legal Intelligencer, once a 
week for four weeks immediately preceding the date of filing his 
credentials with the Board. 

2. He must file the necessary credentials with the Board in such 
form as shall be prescribed at least twenty-one days before the date 
of examination, and shall pay the Board a fee of $25. 

3. He must file a certificate signed by at least three members of 
the Bar in good standing in the judicial district in which he has 
resided or intends to practice, that he is personally known to them, 
and that they believe him to be of good moral character. 

4. A certificate from the dean of the law school or preceptor 
that he has been regular in attendance and pursued the study of the 
law with diligence from the time of registration. 

Rule 5. Every applicant for admission must sustain a satis- 
factory examination in Blackstone's Commentaries, constitutional 
law, including the constitutions of the United States and Pennsyl- 
vania, equity, the law of real and personal property, evidence, de- 



80 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

cedents' estates, landlord and tenant, contracts, commercial law, 
partnership, corporations, crimes, torts, domestic relations, common 
law pleading and practice, Pennsylvania practice, the Federal 
statutes relating to the judiciary and to bankruptcy, Pennsylvania 
statutes and decisions and the rules of the Supreme and Superior 
Courts and of the courts of the county in which the applicant 
intends to practice. 

Rule 6. Examinations for registration and admission to the 
bar shall be conducted in writing, and shall be held simultaneously, 
after due notice, twice a year, in the cities of Philadelphia and 
Pittsburgh. 

Rule 7. The State Board of Law Examiners shall consist of 
five members of this bar, and shall be appointed by the court. 
They shall hold office during the pleasure of the court, for a term 
not exceeding five years, except that, of the members of the board 
now appointed, one shall withdraw at the end of each year, such 
withdrawal to be made in the order of seniority of admission to the 
bar. The members of the board shall serve without compensation 
but shall be reimbursed their travelling and other expenses. The 
board may, with the approval of the court appoint examiners to 
superintend the conduct of the examinations, and to report upon 
the answers of the candidates, but the members of the board shall 
be responsible to the court for the enforcement of these rules, and 
the proper ascertainment of the results of the examinations. The 
Board may also, with the approval of the court, appoint a secre- 
tary and treasurer, or the same person may hold both offices, and 
they may pay to each examiner and to the secretary and treasurer 
out of the fees received, and after deduction of the necessary ex- 
penses, a reasonable compensation. When application is made 
for a suspension of the rules in any particular case, the Board of 
Examiners shall report such application to the Supreme Court with 
a recommendation upon the merits. 

Rule 8. It shall be the duty of the State Board of Law Ex- 
aminers to prepare a paper for gratuitous distribution among in- 
tending applicants for registration or admission, containing detailed 
information as to the subjects of examination. 

Rule 9. Attorneys from other states, upon presenting satis- 
factory evidence that they are members in good standing of the 
a pD el late court of last resort of the State from which they came; 
that the\ have practiced in a court of record of that State for at 
leasl five years, and that thej arc of good moral character, mav 
be admitted to the bar of this court without examination, upon the 

recommendation of the State Board, provided however, that the 
Board may, in its discretion, require am such applicant to take a 

Imal examination. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 81 

Attorneys from other states, upon presenting satisfactory evi- 
dence that they are members in good standing of a court of record 
of the State from which they came, and have practiced therein for 
at least one year, and that they are of good moral character, may, 
in the discretion of the State Board, be permitted to take a final 
examination without previous registration. 

The State Board of Law Examiners may, in its discretion per- 
mit an attorney from another state, without regard to the period 
during which he has practiced law in that State, to take a final 
examination without previous registration in this State, if he shall 
have served a regular clerkship in the office of a practicing attorney 
in this State for a period of at least one year prior to said ex- 
amination. 

Rules of Courts of Cumberland County 

Rule 50. The court shall annually, in January of each year, ap- 
point a board of examiners, consisting of seven members of the 
bar, whose duty it shall be to examine applicants for registration as 
students of law, and also applicants for admission to practice as 
attorneys in the several courts of this county, except in cases here- 
inafter provided. 

Rule 51. No person, except as hereinafter provided, shall be ad- 
mitted to practice law in the Courts of Common Pleas, Quarter 
Sessions of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer and Orphans' Court of 
this county, until he or she shall have passed the examination pro- 
vided by the State Board of Law Examiners. 

Rule 52. No person shall hereafter be admitted to practice as an 
attorney in these courts except upon the following conditions : 

a. He shall be a citizen of the United States of full age. 

b. He shall satisfy the court when he applies for admission that 
he is a person of integrity and good behavior. 

c. He shall file at the same time with the Board of Examiners, 
proof that he has given notice, by advertisement for three weeks in 
a newspaper published in the county of Cumberland, of his inten- 
tion to make application for admission as an attorney, and of the 
time of such intended application. 

d. He shall also file, at the same time, a certificate of the State 
Board of Law Examiners, that he has successfully passed their pre- 
liminary and final examinations. 

Rule 53. The Board of Examiners in cases where the applicant 
presents certificate from the State Board of Law Examiners that he 
or she has successfully passed their preliminary and final examina- 
tions, may recommend his or her admission to the bar without in- 
quiry into his or her knowledge of the law. 



82 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



General Regulations 

But few rules are prescribed. Students are expected to maintain a 
good moral character and a gentlemanly deportment, and to exhibit 
diligence in work. Conversation in the library is strictly prohib- 
ited, and removal of books from the library will result in the exclu- 
sion of the offender from the school. Students must not leave Car- 
lisle during school terms without permission of the Dean, nor ab- 
sent themselves from lectures or recitations without good cause, 
which must be explained to and approved by the Dean and the 
professor in whose department the absence occurs. 

All damages to property may be covered by pro rata assessments. 



Conway Hall 



Collegiate Preparatory 
j School 

OF 

[ Dickinson College 
For Boys 



W. A. HUTCHISON, Ped. D. 

(HEAD MASTER) 



CARLISLE, PA. 



Historical Note 

The Collegiate Preparatory School, known for nearly a cen- 
tury as the "Grammar School," was founded in 1783, in connec- 
tion with Dickinson College, and as its special preparatory school. 
It did its assigned duty throughout the first half-century of the 
life of the college, and when, in 1833, the latter was reorganized 
under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the school 
was retained as a part of the reorganized institution. In 1869 
it was discontinued, and in 1877 reorganized. The school is not 
an organic part of the college, but is under the immediate super- 
vision of the President of the college and the Executive Com- 
mittee. Its success since its reorganization has been marked. 

CONWAY HALL 

Conway Hall is the gift of Andrew Carnegie. Its total value, 
including the Headmaster's residence, is approximately $90,000. 
It is built of white brick with trimmings of Hummelstown brown- 
stone, is 78 feet wide, 183 feet long, and four stories in height. 

On the first floor of the main building are located the recitation 
rooms, literary society halls, dining rooms, and Headmaster's of- 
fices. The basement is well-lighted and heated, perfectly free 
from dampness. In it are located the commercial departments, 
physical laboratory, lockers and bath, dressing and game rooms. 

At the request of Mr. Carnegie, and as a tribute to his friend. 
Moncure Daniel Conway, L.H.D., of the class of '49, the build- 
ing was designated "Conway Hall," by which name the school has 
since been known. 






General Information 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL 

No entrance examination is required, but the students will be 
expected to be proficient in spelling, the "rudiments of English 
Grammar and Arithmetic, and in the writing of easy English. 
In cases where students enter advanced classes by certificates from 
other schools, they will be placed on trial in such classes as their 
certificates may seem to warrant. 

However, no student will be given full credit for all the re- 
quired work for college entrance in English, Mathematics, Mod- 
ern or Ancient Languages, without continuing some work in the 
school in these respective subjects or taking an examination in the 
same. 

Students are received at any time during the year, though en- 
trance at the beginning of the term is, for many reasons, desirable. 
They should be in Carlisle at least one day earlier than the day 
appointed for the beginning of the Fall session, and promptly on 
hand at the opening of each subsequent term. Each student, upon 
entering, must furnish a certificate as to his moral character. 

CERTIFICATE PRIVILEGES 

The Certificate of Conway Hall is accepted by all colleges 
whose admission requirements are satisfied by this method. 

REPORTS 

Weekly reports are posted on the bulletin giving each student's 
grade for the past week. 

Reports of work are submitted to students and parents at the 
end of the first four weeks of each term and every three weeks 
thereafter. Besides these reports, a term report containing sum- 
mation of the students' record for the term is sent at the end of 
each term to the parents. These reports contain grades of work 
done by the student, and also the average grade of the class. 

A term grade of 90 per cent., or more, in a given subject in 
which no tri-weekly report has been below 85 per cent., will make 
final examination in the given subject optional. 

85 



86 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

Few preparatory schools offer their students such excellent 
library facilities as Conway Hall. Our students can secure books 
from the extensive libraries of Dickinson College and also from 
the J. Herman Bosler Memorial Public Library. 

THE LABORATORIES 

Conway Hall has • a well equipped physical laboratory of its 
own, but also has access to the laboratories of Dickinson College, 
thus having an equipment rarely available to preparatory students. 

ATHLETICS 

Exercise is to the body what study is to the mind. It develops 
it. Good health plays an important part in success. Sound 
thoughts and sound bodies usually go together. 

More than ordinary attention is given at Conway Hall to the 
physical development of the students. Every boy is encouraged to 
enter some form of athletic sport. The school aims to have many 
students engage in the sport rather than to have a few athletic 
stars merely to win games. The various teams are under the 
direct supervision of able coaches. 

GYMNASIUM 

The gymnasium is large and roomy. The main hall is 75 feet 
long and 40 feet wide. The eastern wing is 60 feet long by 20 
feet wide and is appropriated to office purpose and bathing and 
dressing room accommodations. It also has a running gallery 235 
feet long. The western wing contains the base-ball cage and is 80 
feet long and 20 feet wide. 

In addition, a large room is fitted up in the main building with 
shuffle boards, chest weights, etc., for the double purpose of ex- 
ercise and pleasure. 

Within three minutes of the school is the athletic field. 

THE HERMAN BOSLER BIDDLE MEMORIAL 
ATHLETIC FIELD 

Through the thoughtful generosity of the Hon. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward W. Biddle, of Carlisle, the college has recently come into 
possession of one of the finest and best-equipped athletic fields in 

the country, known as "The Herman Hosier Biddle Memorial 

Athletic Field," so named in Loving memory of their lamented son, 

Merman Hosier Biddle. class of ( M. The field, which is more 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



87 



than six acres in area, located on the Chambersburg turnpike, 
easily accessible from the college and Conway Hall, is admirably 
adapted to the purposes for which it has been prepared. The field 
is entered at the northeastern corner through a noble gateway, 
most artistically designed, with massive abutments of brick, with 
trimmings of stone, and provided with iron gates, of elegant de- 
sign. In the pillar at the right side is a chaste and beautiful tablet 
of bronze, with letters in relief, bearing the following inscription: 



THE HERMAN BOSLER BIDDLE 
MEMORIAL ATHLETIC FIELD 

1883 1908 

CLASS OF 1903 



On the western side is the great grand-stand with a strong brick 
wall, six feet in height, extending the entire length, and pierced 
by three entrance-ways, reached by steps rising from the outside. 
The seats, which are constructed on the plan of those in the 
erand-stand of the Franklin Field of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, are exceedingly comfortable, and will accommodate nine 
hundred and fifty spectators. In front of the grand-stand stretches 
the straightaway track, twenty feet in width, the same forming a 
section of the quarter-mile track, every part of which is in full 
view of the stand. Within the ellipse formed by the track are lo- 
cated the diamond and gridiron for baseball and football work. 
Ample opportunity is afforded for a second diamond and, if need 
be, a second gridiron for practice purposes. On the eastern side 
there are five tennis-courts. 

EXPENSES 

For boarding students, the total charge varies from $350 to 
£400, according to the kind and location of room. This charge will 
cover all expense for furnished room, light, heat, board, tuition, 
laundry (except fine linen), everything, in fact, except cost of 
books. 

The total charge for students residing in the town is $75 per 
year, plus an athletic fee of $5, which entitles the student to free 
admission to all athletic games and contests taking place on the 
Biddle Field. 



88 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

In cases where two or more students from the same family shall 
be in the school at the same time, a reduction of 10 per cent on 
the term bill of each will be made. 

The school desires to aid worthy young men, particularly those 
preparing for the gospel ministry. There are various ways by 
means of which worthy young men can secure aid to assist them- 
selves in their education. 

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION 

The instruction is personal throughout. Classes are made small 
that each student may get the necessary individual attention. 

PRECEPTORS 

In the fall term of 19 14 the school introduced a preceptorial 
system. Extra preceptors will work in conjunction with the regu- 
lar teachers and give special assistance to boys who have difficulty 
with their work. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

There are Literary Societies and a vigorous Y. M. C. A. in 
charge of the students themselves but assisted by members of the 
faculty. The Student Senate has proved a valuable adjunct in 
moulding school life. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Classical, Latin Scientific, Scientific, and English or Commer- 
cial Course, each covers four years. The special work of the 
school is fitting for college and technical schools. In recent years 
the school has laid special stress on fitting students for the prelimi- 
nary law examinations of Pennsylvania. 

DISTRIBUTION OF CONWAY HALL STUDENTS 

Pennsylvania, 69 South Dakota 

Maryland, 8 Massachusetts, 1 

Delaware 6 Connecticut, 1 

New York 6 Cuba 1 

West Virginia 6 Oklahoma 1 

New J ersey 4 China 1 

District of Columbia, ... 2 

M innesota 2 1 ic 

For catalog and full information, address \V. A. Hutchison, 
Carlisle, Pa. 



Register of Students 

I. COLLEGE 

C. — Classical Course. 

L. S. — Latin-Scientific Course. 

Sc. — Scientific Course. 

Ph. — Philosophical Course. 

P. — Partial course not leading to graduation. 

When no other state is mentioned residence is in Pennsylvania. 

SENIORS 

Name Course Residence 

Aller, Paul P C Mt. Holly Springs 

Baker, Elias B C Philadelphia 

Borton, Everett E L. S Elmer, N. J. 

Bouton, Arthur A C Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bream, Margaret A L. S Carlisle 

Bryson, S. Russell C Mauch Chunk 

Coleman, A. Edward Ph Allentown 

Cooper, William E Ph Halifax 

Crites, Bartholomew E Ph Williamsport 

Day, Margaret R X. S Port Morris, N. J. 

Dexter, Mabel A L. S Honesdale 

Edel, William W C Baltimore, Md. 

Eshelman, William L L. S Mohnton 

Evans, G. Winifred C Tyrone 

Fasick, Ray H C Carlisle 

Fite, Alonzo S C Philadelphia 

Gates, Robert C Ph Renovo 

Hagner, Leonard G Ph Wilmington, Del. 

Hecht, Lester S L. S Lock Haven 

Hodgson, Kathryn M L. S Felton, Del. 

Hornberger, Hiester R C Sinking Spring 

Howard, Elizabeth L. S Mount Carmel 

Kistler, Robert B L. S Minersville 

Kistler, Walter W L. S Minersville 

Laverty, Lawson S C Harrisburg 

Laubenstein, Paul F C Harrisburg 

Lippincott, Haines H C Swarthmore 

89 



90 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SENIORS, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Malcolm, Gilbert, Ph New York City 

Mason, M. Phyllis L. S Laurel, Del 

Meily, Joseph L. S Mechanicsburg 

Milligan, Robert D Ph Wellsville 

Mitchell, Ina E L. S Beach Lake 

Morgan, Hugh C C Carlisle 

Mount joy, Harry C Boyertown 

Neff, J. Luther C Gordon 

Nelson, G. Helene Ph Trenton, N. J. 

Neyhard, Helen B L. S Carlisle 

Peters, Eva L. S Uriah 

Reiff, Roberta L. S New Cumberland 

Ritchey, Irene C Ph Carlisle 

Sellers, M. Ruth L. S Carlisle 

Sieber, D. Ralph Ph Reedsville 

Small, J. Ohrum Sc Laurel, Del. 

Spitznas. James E L. S Frostburg, Md. 

Wagg, Ethel L. S Collingswood, N J. 

Wallace, David M L. S Middletown 

Warfield, Clarence G L. S Rockville, Md. 

Watts, Chester E L. S Carlisle 

Whiteley, Miriam F C Williamsburg 

Wilson. Stanley G L. S Hagerstown, Md. 

Zimmerman, G. Floyd Ph A^illiamsport 



Allison, Albert H. . . 
Bradley, George W. 
Brewer, Raymond R. 
Bucher, Mabel V. . . 
Craig, Margaret A. . 
Curran, Thomas V. 
Dysart, Russell B. . . 
Ganoe, Robert L. 
Garner, G. Dickson 
Graham, Daniel F. .. 
I farman, Charles • I. 

I [art, l' I .« lie 

I [art, I '. Shuman . . 
Hodgson, Robert S. 
I'll i < j . Thomas l\. . 





Ph. . 




Shippensburg 




L. S. 




Camden, N. J. 




C. .. 




Sylvan 




L. S. 




Carlisle 




L. S. 




New York City 




L. S. 




Mincrsville 




L. S. 




lull wood 




I. S. 




Chambersburg 




Ph. . 




1 [arrisburg 




Ph. . 




I [arrisburg 




I. S. 




YToungwood 




Ph. . 




Pottstowu 




C. .. 




1 1 arrisburg 




1. s. 




Felton, Del. 




c. .. 




Pen \t.i'\l 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



91 



JUNIORS, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Johnston, Vernon R L. S Mr. Joy 

Kern, Russel B C Emerald 

Lauman, Helen D L. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Lepperd, J. Wayne L. S Carlisle 

Lippincott, Samuel T C Swarthmore 

Lutz, Sylvia P Ph Carlisle 

MacGregor, Thomas W. . . . Ph Carlisle 

McMahon, Mary J L. S Harrisburg 

McWhinney, Russell R L. S Homestead 

Massey, Reynolds C L. S Goshen, N. J. 

Michael, Raymond S. Ph Harrisburg 

Moose, George C Ph Luthersburg 

Needy, A. Norman Ph Waynesboro 

Nieman, Benjamin L Ph Northampton 

Reisler, Herbert S L. S Nottingham 

Reitz, Charles H L. S Mount Carmel 

Rogers, D. Paul Sc Harrisburg 

Rupert, Beatrice E L. S Carlisle 

Rupp, David Mohler C Shiremanstown 

Shelley, Daniel H L. S Mechanicsburg 

Shuey, Anna M Ph Belief onte 

Smith, C. Hammond Ph Williamsport 

Stephens, William Ganoe . .L. S Carlisle 

Stevens, John M C Georgetown, Del. 

Taylor, Lloyd E L. S East Stroudsburg 

Van Auken, Clark L C Blairstown, N. J 

Wiener, Amelia K L. S Carlisle 

Woods, Agnes S L. S Carlisle 



SOPHOMORES 



Name 
TBagenstose, Abner H. 
Baker, Florence D. . 

Baker, Oris J 

Bashore Ralph M. . . 

Bobb, Mary C 

Brookmire, James G. 
Campbell, William E. 
Compton, Lewis V. . 
Corson, Fred P, 
Courtney, Berkeley 




Residence 



Orwigsburg 

Mt, Holly Springs 

Curwensville 

Tremont 

Carlisle 

Port Carbon 

Mechanicsburg 

Dias Creek. N. J. 

Millville, N. J. 

Millersville, Md. 



92 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SOPHOMORES, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Dalton, Allan B Ph Chester 

Davies, Elbert L L. S Montrose 

Davis, Michael F C Eatontown, N. J. 

Deeter, Jasper N., Jr L. S Harrisburg 

Dietrich, Mark S C Carlisle 

Dolby, Delbert L L. S Seaford, Del. 

Donelson, Emory E C Saxton 

Dougherty, Mary M Ph Plainfield 

Ede, Francis H. S C Pen Argyl 

Eichhorn, Oscar J Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

Eppley, Mervin G Sc Carlisle 

Eslinger, Ruth H L. S Roaring Spring 

Evans, Miriam G L. S Tyrone 

Filler, Donald B C Carlisle 

Fox, John H Ph Carlisle 

Frescoln, Leonard H Sc Pottstown 

Goodhart, Fred E Sc Carlisle 

Goodyear, Jacob M L. S Carlisle 

Greenig, William F C Wenonah, N. J. 

Groome, Walter G P Portage 

Hartzell, Max Ph Beaver Meadow 

Heck, Paul W Ph Coatesville 

Hering, George C, Jr L. S Felton, Del. 

Hertzler, Lyman G Sc Carlisle 

Hoff, Samuel H Ph Lykens 

Hoover, George V L. S Penbrook 

Hopkins, Joseph A L. S Harrisonville, N. J. 

Burner, Christian P C Carlisle 

Johnson, Lloyd R L. S \sbury, N. J. 

Jones, Helen L. S Carlisle 

Kcat, S. Harold C Johnstown 

Leidigh, George W C Carlisle 

Leidigh, Margery F C Carlisle 

!.• on, Ivirl C Ph Atlantic City. N. J. 

McCabe, Joshua B C Bishopville, Md. 

McMillan. Margaret V L. S Carlisle 

Marks. Gordon M ,Th Carlisle 

Mead, Douglass S Ph Greenwich, Conn 

Mechanic, Max 1 1,. S Wyoming, Del. 

Meek, Anna Elizabeth 1, S Carlisle 

Meek, Roy S Ph East \ltoonn 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



93 



SOPHOMORES, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Meloy, Olga Ph Harrisburg 

Meredith, Gladys W L. S Maplewood. N. J 

Mohler, Anna L. S Carlisle 

Mohler, Nora M C Carlisle 

Mumma, Samuel L Ph Highspire 

Myers, Robert L., Jr L. S Camp Hill 

Nicklas, Charles R Ph Chambersburg 

Prather, Perry F L. S Clear Spring, Md. 

Price, Harry L L. S Minersville 

Priddis, Milton R L. S Carlisle 

Puderbaugh, J. Frank Sc Eldorado 

Reiff, Janet E L. S New Cumberland 

Respess, Homer M C Baltimore, Md. 

Reuwer, Joseph F Ph Paxtang 

Robinson, H. Delmer E. S Winchester, Va. 

Sharman, David, Jr L, S Fritztown 

Shelley, Carl B Ph Steelton 

Shelley, Frank L P Steelton 

Shollenberger, Clarence L., L. S Auburn, N. J. 

Shope, Edward P Ph Harrisburg 

Shuey, Herman J L. S Harrisburg 

Shumpp, Cecilia M L. S Carlisle 

Strite, Albert L. S Chambersburg 

Stuart, Christine B L. S Carlisle 

Wagner. Marie L C Carlisle 

Warfield, Gaither P C Rockville, Md. 

Weinberg, David Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

White, J. Gilbert L. S Lewistown 

Woodward, Robert E C Fort Ituachua, Arizona 

FRESHMEN 



Name Course 

Adams, Raymond D L. S 

Albertson, A. Byron Ph. 

Asper, John E Ph. 

Barbour, J. Murray L. S 

Barnhardt, Walter L L. S 

Beam, Herbert P L. S 

Beattie, Paul A Ph. 

Bender, Irene J C. . 



Residence 

Point Pleasant. 

Morrill, Neb. 

Mechanicsburg 

Chambersburg 

Llewellyn 

Carlisle 

Shippensburg 

Carlisle 



N. J. 



94 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

FRESHMEN, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Berkheimer, Charles F L. S Mechanicsburg 

Bixler, Harold H C Carlisle 

Blair, Andrew C Carlisle 

Bolowicz, Felix W L. S Larksville 

Brady, Edward A. C Ph Minersville 

Brame, Luther F C Carlisle 

Breisch, Howard R L. S Hazleton 

Burton, William F Ph Seaford, Del. 

Byars, Ralph O. Ph Alverton 

Carson, C. Frank Ph Parkesburg 

Carter, Harold S C Philadelphia 

Church, Iva M P Carlisle 

Clark, M. Mabel L. S Harrisburg 

Coyle, Mervin G Ph Craigheads 

Craine, A. Eleanore Ph Altoona 

Crunkleton, Walter Ph Greencastle 

Dorsey, F. Donald L. S Mt. Airy, Md. 

Duvall, Ira R Ph Akersville 

Evans, Harry A L. S Pottsville 

Evans. Marion G L. S Tyrone 

Evans, Sylvester M P Kinzer 

Ewing, Helen Ruth L. S Tyrone 

Faddis, Robert E Ph Parkesburg 

Filler, Mildred Clare C Carlisle 

Fisher, Iva M Ph Asbury Park, N. J. 

Flegal, Russell C Ph Clearfield 

Flood Eugene T Ph Beaver Meadows 

Gardner, Anna Belle Ph Perryville, Md. 

Gaydos, Anna E P Johnstown 

Gerberich. Albert H. Jr. . . . L. S Parkesburg 

Glenwright, Mary E Ph Minersville 

('.(id win, W. Francis Ph Georgetown, Del. 

Griffin, Dana F L. S I [arrisburg 

Harris, M. Wilson C Centreville, Md. 

1 1' mminger, Ruth Ph Carlisle 

Henley, Walter \ Ph Woodstock, Md. 

I [ennen, James C Ph \ltoona 

Holmes, C. Wendell L. S Cape May Court Houst N J 

Holtzinger, W. Jackson ...Ph Tyrone 

I [ouseman, Elma Maj L . S Carlisle 

I [untsman, I [arry \ I.. S T\ i one 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 95 

FRESHMEN, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Hutchison, Paul L L. S Carlisle 

Hykes, Oscar M Ph Shippensburg 

Kell, Lillian M L. S Steelton 

Kenworthy, C. Hubert .... Ph Parkesburg 

Kerr, George C Ph Wiconisco 

Koser, Edmund J L. S Newville 

Krall, Elizabeth L Ph Shippensburg 

Kramer, Mildred H Ph Harrisburg 

Laucks, Earl E P Alverton 

Lesher, Thomas W Ph Palmyra 

Lippi, Elva R L. S Harrisburg 

Long, William O Ph Carlisle 

McCready, James C Ph Summit Hill 

McNeal, James H., Jr C Easton, Md. 

Marvil, Nellie H Ph Laurel, Del. 

Masland, Frank E.. Jr Ph Bustleton 

Mathis, L. Edison P Atlantic City, N. J. 

May, M. Eleanor C Harrisburg 

May, M. Margaret C Harrisburg 

Mellott, Amos C L. S Coalport 

Miller, Earl E P Arendtsville 

Minick, Mary E C Carlisle 

Mohler, Roy W L. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Morrow, John B Ph Shippensburg 

Mortimer, Earle L Sc Altoona 

Mullin, Madeleine W. L. S Wilmington, Del. 

Mumma, Robert R L. S Mechanicsburg 

Nelson, Elna H Ph Dyberry 

Noll, Ruth M C Carlisle 

Nuttle, Harold C P Denton, Md. 

Palm, A. Maurice L. S Philipsburg 

Pearson, John M Ph Hurffville, N. J. 

Price, Harper A Ph Altoona 

Price, Mildred H L. S Carlisle 

Probst, Jesse W Ph Lock Haven 

Protzman, Merle L Ph Waynesboro 

Rarig, Lester G L. S Catawissa 

Read, Clark D Ph Clearfield 

Richards, John T., Jr Ph Hazleton 

Ritts, M. Marie L. S Mehoopany 

Robinson, Herbert K Ph Altoona 



96 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

FRESHMEN, continued 

Name Course Residence 

Roorbach, Agnew O Ph Cape May Court House, N. J- 

Ruch, Robert E P Carlisle 

Russell Aubrey G Ph Westneld, N. J. 

Sanford, Hazel L. S Tunkhannock 

Saul, Reuben C Ph Reading 

Schmitz, Karl B L. S Connellsville 

Sellers, Harry U L. S Tyrone 

Shepherd, Horace F Ph Philadelphia 

Smith, Bessie E L. S Monocacy 

Smith, Herbert I L. S White Plains, N. Y. 

Spong, Ralph B L. S Millersburg 

Springer, Constance L L. S Carlisle 

Stapleton, W. Maynard Ph Pottsville 

Stein, James B., Jr P Hazleton 

Sylvester, William B P Marydel, Del. 

Taylor, Logan B P Cape May, N. J. 

Taylor, William P., Jr L. S Georgetown, Del. 

Upperco, Jacob C Ph Boring, Md. 

Vaughn, Kenneth B L. S Altoona 

Walter, George H Ph Greencastle 

Walters, John F L. S Altoona 

Weidenhafer. J. David L. S Shamokin 

Wellivcr, Lester A C Hazleton 

Willits. Seymour R Ph Madison, N. J. 

Womer, P. Blake L. S Huntingdon 

Wright, Franklin N P Norlhville, N. Y. 

Young Edmund G L. S Tunkhannock 

Zielasco, Walter H Ph Minersville 

SUMMARY 

Seniors 5 1 

Juniors 43 

Sophomores 80 

Freshmen IJ 8 

DISTRIBUTION 

Pennsylvania 226 Arizona 1 

New IiTscy 26 Connecticut ' 

Maryland 17 Nebraska I 

D( laware 15 Virginia I 

New York i 



II School of Law 

SENIOR CLASS 

Bashore, Luther Edward . . Schuylkill Haven . . Conway Hall 

Bender, Thomas William . . Lilly Delta Theta Phi 

Brown, G. Lewis West Pittston 144 S. Hanover St 

Burns, John Albert Waterbury, Conn. . Delta Theta Phi 

Cunningham, Daniel W. . . . Enid Y. M C A 

Davis, David Summit Hill ..'.'".' .' West'and Pomfret St< 

Evans, Elmer Lloyd Kane Delta Chi 

Fanseen, Foster H Mt. Pocono 146 W Hi^h St 

^ rim ' T 'i*'. Y ^k 241 W. Pomfrei St 

Ginter, William Coyle .... Carlisle Delta Chi 

Goldstein, Hyman Portage Phi Epsilon Pi 

Gunter, William Arthur . . . Frostburg, Md. . . . . 141 W. Pomfret St 

Haberstroh, John J Juniata Delta Theta Phi 

Hemphill, John H Altoona Y. M. C. A 

Ingram, Rowland Bradshaw Lewes, Del Phi Kappa Psi 

Kearney, Joseph Lilly i 3I W . High St 

Levin, Samuel Harrisburg Phi Epsilon Pi 

Martin, Thompson S West Fairview .... West Fairview 

McKeown, Harry Chester Delta Theta Phi 

Morosim, Harry Joseph . . . Scranton Delta Theta Phi 

Nowicki, Henry Nanticoke 150 W. Pomfret St 

Parsons, John Willits, Jr. . Atlantic City, N. J. Phi Delta Theta 

Potter, Ernest Gurdon .... Kane Delta Chi 

Raker, Louis Olyphant [[ 137 S . Hanover St 

bmith, Raymond Fulton . . . Lehighton Alpha Chi Rho 

Still, Charles Harbacker . . York Berg Buildin- 

Wilson, James Johnston . . Colorado Springs, Berg Building 

MIDDLE CLASS 

Baldwin Allan Glenn Olean, N. Y 22Q W. Pomfret St. 

Chase J. Mitchell Clearfield Berg Building 

Coll, Joseph Francis Ebervale 3 E Louther St 

^ laS , ter ' J° el Lock Haven 141 W . Pomfret' St 

Coplan, Harry Mt. Carmel Phi Epsilon Pi 

Courtney, James Henry ... Oil City 252 W. Pomfret St 

rZ^A o anid Matthew M *hanoy City 3 E. Louther St. 

Si? ' Nesquehoning Phi Kappi Psi 

Hibbard, John J Wanamie 131 W. High St. 

97 



98 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

MIDDLE CLASS, continued 

Keller, Niemond Foreman . Mifflintown 407 W. South St. 

Kraus, Sidney Ellwood City Phi Epsilon Pi 

Leopold, J. Bashore Lebanon Delta Chi 

Marshall, Kendall C Philadelphia 130 W. High St. 

Massinger, James Chester . Butler, N. J Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Maxey, David Rexford Forest City City 

McKone, J. C Carlisle Sigma Chi 

Miller, A. F Lebanon 140 W. High St. 

Newman, Luther L Harrisburg Harrisburg 

Pannell, John Dress Steelton 249 S. West St. 

Pifer, Henry Weber Punxsutawney 215 Walnut St. 

Plessett, David Plymouth Phi Epsilon Pi 

Powell, A. Stuart Dorranceton 170 W. Pomfret St. 

Prince, Joseph Leonard . . . Pottstown Phi Epsilon Pi 

Rockmaker, Hyman Hazleton 49 S. Pitt St. 

Riordan, Frank S Summit Hill 102 S. West St. 

Rosenberg, Wolfe Philadelphia Phi Epsilon Pi 

Scott, Francis Barrett Carbondale Delta Chi 

Scribner, Alex St. John . . . Brookville Phi Delta Theta 

Shelley, John Lawrence, Jr. Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg 

Shenton, Clarence George . Carlisle Conway Hall 

Standemeier, Charles W. . Ashland Delta Theta Phi 

Terry, Edward King Maytown Y. M. C. A. 

Wise, William Barton . . . . Altoona Sigma Chi 

Yates, J. Russell Scranton 229 W. Pomfret St. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Achterman, Leo A Stroudsburg 122 S. West St. 

Aller, Paul P Mt. Holly Springs . Mt. Holly Springs 

Andre, Jesse A. C Stroudsburg 122 S. West St. 

Baxter, James Louis Crafton 252 W. Pomfret St. 

Bonin, John H Hazleton 3 E. Lout her St. 

Borton, Everett E Elmer, N. J East College 

Bradley, George W Camden, N. J \\ Vst College 

Brenneman, John Elder . . . Wellsville 275 W. Louthcr St. 

Brunei*, Henry M Columbia -75 W. 1. outlier Si 

Burke, William Paul Nanticokc 150 \Y. Pomfrel St. 

Clark. George Akc I Castings Delta Chi 

Clark, Harold Alexander ..Wilkes Bam Y. M. C. A 

Cooper, W. E Halifax Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Curran, Thomas V Minersville West Coll< 

Barrell, William Francis . .Easl Stroudsburg ..Delta Theta Phi 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 99 

JUNIOR CLASS, continued 

Farrow, Malcom Collins . . . Carlisle 248 W. Pomf ret St. 

Fineberg, Nathan Louis . . . Altoona 136 S. Hanover St. 

Gillespie, John Francis . . . . Shamokin 245 W. Pomfret St. 

Gorson, Cyrus S Philadelphia Phi Epsilon Pi 

Gorson, Saul Carlton Atlantic City, N. J. Phi Epsilon Pi 

Groome, Walter G Portage East College 

Harman Charles H Youngwood Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Hecht, Lester S Lock Haven West College 

Heckman, Daryle R Johnstown City 

Heskett, Charles Piedmont, W. Va. . Delta Chi 

Hoff, Samuel H Lykens Sigma Chi 

Hollis, William Yeagertown 150 W. Pomfret St. 

Howard, Louis A Steelton Steelton 

Johnson, Frank Atlantic City, N. J. Kappa Sigma 

Kinley, David H Williamsport 150 W. Pomfret St. 

Luria, William York Phi Epsilon Pi 

McCarthy, Howard P Barnsboro Delta Chi 

McGuire, Eugene Joseph . . Branchdale 150 W. Pomfret St. 

Malcolm, Gilbert New York City ... 137 W. Louther St. 

Massey, Reynolds C Goshen, N. J West College 

Needy, A. Norman Waynesboro West College 

Nieman, Ben Northampton Phi Epsilon Pi 

O'Hare, Felix F Shenandoah Delta Theta Phi 

Prather, Perry F Clear Spring, Md. . Beta Theta Pi 

Raub, Paul Sterling Red Lion West and Pomfret Sts. 

Reitz, Charles H Mt. Carmel Conway Hall 

Royal, John Douglas M. . . . Harrisburg Harrisburg 

Rupp, David Shiremanstown .... Shiremanstown 

Savige, Laurence D Montrose 150 W. Pomfret St. 

Schneller, Stanley G Catasauqua ..122 S. West St. 

Setzer, Eugene Dunmore Delta Chi 

Shelley, Daniel H Mechanicsburg .... Mechanicsburg 

Sieber, David Ralph Reedsville Alpha Chi Rho 

Simmons, Alfred G Hazleton Beta Theta Pi 

Smarsh, John Albert Chambersburg Chambersburg 

Smith, Edward Heilman . . Annville 121 E. Pomfret St. 

Smith, C. Hammond Williamsport West College 

Taylor, Lloyd E East Stroudsburg ..East College 

Turek, Frederick Glen Lyon 260 S. West St. 

Wallace, David M Middletown 239 W. Louther St. 

Walter, John Allen Lebanon 121 E. Pomfret St. 

Warfield, Clarence G Rockville, Md Kappa Sigma 

Welch, Gus Spooner, Wis Conway Hall 



100 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

SUMMARY 



Seniors . 
Middlers 
Juniors . 



27 
34 

58 



Pennsylvania 
Delaware ... 
Colorado . . . 
Connecticut . 
Maryland .. . 



DISTRIBUTION 



89 
4 

1 
1 
1 



New York 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Registered elsewhere, 



119 



I 

1 

I 

20 

119 



DISTRIBUTION OF ALL STUDENTS 

College 292 

School of Law 119 

Conway Hall no 



Less students counted twice 



521 
20 



SUMMARY OF ALL STUDENTS 



Pennsylvania 383 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Delaware 

New York 

West Virginia 

Connecticut 

1 district of Columbia 

Minnesota 

South Dakota 

Arizona 



30 

27 

25 
II 
7 
3 
2 
2 
2 
I 



China 

Colorado 

Cuba 

Massachusetts 
Nebraska .... 
Oklahoma . . . 

Virginia 

Wisconsin . . . 



501 



1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 

501 



INDEX 



page: 

Admission 17 

Admission, Requirements 

for 18-22 

Alumni Associations 51-53 

Alumni Fund Committee ... 53 

Alumni Statistics 7 

Astronomy 40 

Athletic Association 55,56 

Athletic Field 45 

Bible 29 

Bills, College 47 

Biology 29, 30 

Botany 29 

Business Course 24 

Calendar, College 5, 6 

Certificates, Admission 17 

Chemistry 30, 31 

Conway Hall 82-88 

Courses of Study 23 

Degrees 46 

Degrees Conferred 14-16 

Economics 31-34 

Education 40, 41 

English 34,35 

Examinations 17 

Expenses 47-49 

Faculty, College 1 1, 12 

French 42, 43 

Geology 35 

German 35,36 

Gowns, Hoods, and Caps . . .49, 50 

Greek 36,37 

Grounds and Buildings 45 

Gymnasium 45 

Heredity 30 

History 37 

Instruction 25 

International Law 37 

Italian 43 



PAGK 

Latin 38,39 

Law 39 

Law Course 24 

Law School — 
Admission of Students . . 74 
Admission to the Bar . . . 78-81 
Course of Instruction ...71,72 

Court Privileges 77 

Degrees 70,77,78 

Establishment 66 

Examinations 76 

Expenses 78 

Faculty 69 

Incorporators 67, 68 

Library 77 

Material Equipment 76,77 

Methods of Instruction ..72,73 

Moot Courts 73 

Officers of the Corpora- 
tion 68 

Offices and Moot Courts .73,74 

Privileges, Special 77 

Register of Students ....97-100 
Registration in Pennsyl- 
vania 74-76 

Regulations, General 82 

Terms and Vacations 78 

Library 45 

Library Guild 54 

Literature 35 

Literary Societies 51 

Material Equipment 45 

Mathematics 39, 40 

Medical Preparatory course 24 

Metzger College 47 

Order of Studies — 

Freshman Class 26 

Sophomore Class 26, 27 

Junior Class 27,28 



101 



102 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Senior Class 28 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 54 

Philosophy 40, 41 

Physical Training 41 

Physics 41, 42 

Prizes 57~6o 

Psychology 40 

Public Speaking 42 

Register of Students 89-100 

Scholarships 60-62 

Senate and Student Assem- 
bly, 34,35 



P\GE 

Sociology 31-34 

Spanish 44 

Special Courses 23-25 

Teachers' Course 25 

Trustees, Board of 8-9 

Visitors, Official 13 

Worship 46 

Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation 51 

Young Women's Christian 

Association 51 

Zoology 29 







^: ■'■■;■.■-.;;: : . ,':■•■■ ; ..v' : , : 



Btcfcmson College 
bulletin 



Vol. X 



FEBRUARY, 1916 



No. 4 



THE CATALOGUE 

1915^16 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY — MAY — JULY 
NOVEMBER 



Entered as second-olasa matter* January 19, 1906, at the post-offioe at Carlisle, Pa. 
under Act of Congress, of July 18, 1894 



CATALOGUE OF 

Bttfetnson College 



1915-1916 



133rd ANNUAL SESSION 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MDCCCCXVI 



1915 


1916 


1917 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


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OCTOBER 


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15 



COLLEGE CALENDAR — 1915-1916 

FALL TERM — 1915 

September 16, Thursday, 2.30 p.m. . . Fall Term begins. 

September 17, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

November 25-28 Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 17, Wednesday, 10.30 a.m. Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM — 1916 

January 4, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Winter Term begins. 

January 24-29 Week of Prayer in College. 

March 3, Friday Intercollegiate Debates. 

March 17, Friday, 10.30 a.m Winter Term ends. 

SPRING TERM — 1916 

March 28, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Spring Term begins. 

May 22-25 Final examinations, Seniors. 

May 29- June 2 Final examinations, other classes. 

June 3, Saturday, 8 p.m Junior Oratorical Contest, Pierson 

Prizes. 

June 4, Sunday, 11 a.m Baccalaureate sermon. 

6.30 p.m Campus song service. 

7.30 p.m Address before the College Christian 

Associations. 

June 5, Monday, 2 p.m Senior Class Day exercises. 

4 p.m Annual meeting of the Incorporators 

of the School of Law. 

7 p.m Annual meeting of the Trustees of 

the College. 

8 p.m Concert by the musical organiza- 

tions of the College. 

10 p.m Junior Promenade. 

June 6, Tuesday, 9.30 a.m Class reunions, followed by Alumni 

Association meetings. 

12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 

5.00 p.m Meeting of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

8-11 p.m President's Reception. 

June 7, Wednesday, 8.15 a.m Class advancements. 

9.30 a.m ■. Commencement exercises of the Col- 
lege and School of Law. 

FALL TERM— 1916 

September 21, Thursday, 2.30 p.m. . . Fall Term begins. 
December 22, Friday, 10.30 a.m Fall Term ends. 



ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total 5,411 

Legal profession 1,040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of the United States 1 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 3 

Attorney-Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 39 

Members of State Assemblies L32 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 4 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church 1 

Presidents of colleges U 

Ileads of professional schools 10 

Professors in colleges 135 

Superintendents of schools 66 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools 260 

Instructors in lower-grade schools 610 

Noti;.- -This record, It .should be ol.srrvrd, dors Qot fully «'\piv.ss the useful work doU 

l>y the ( SollegAi m In the earlier days of the Institution the reoorda «rare but indifferent ly 
■ d, uid m It trai las! revised more than four yeara ago. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle . . . . President 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq Vice-President 

Rev. Charles W. Straw, D.D Secretary 

John S. Bursk Treasurer 

TERM EXPIRES 1916 

Henry P. Cannon Bridgeville, Del. 

Melville Gambrill Wilmington, Del. 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq Philadelphia 

Rev. Frank B. Lynch, D.D Philadelphia 

Gen. James F. Rusling, LL.D Trenton, N.J. 

Wilmer W. Salmon Rochester, N.Y. 

Rev. Robert Watt Smyrna, Del. 

William L. Woodcock, Esq Altoona 

TERM EXPIRES 1917 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle Carlisle 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. William P. Davis, D.D Camden, N.J. 

Robert W. Irving, Esq Carlisle 

Rev. George B. Wight, D.D Trenton, N.J. 

Rev. Bishop Luther B. Wilson, LL.D New York City 

Charles K. Zug, Esq Philadelphia 

TERM EXPIRES 1918 

J. Henry Baker, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. Bishop Joseph F. Berry, LL.D Philadelphia 

Edward M. Biddle, Jr., Esq Carlisle 

Abram Bosler Carlisle 

Rev. William W. Evans, D.D Washington, D.C. 

Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Alexander Simpson, Jr., LL.D Philadelphia 

Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq Philadelphia 

C. Price Speer Chambersburg 

Rev. William A. Stephens, D.D Carlisle 

Rev. Charles W. Straw, D.D Philadelphia 

Hon. George R. Willis Baltimore, Md. 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 



TERM EXPIRES 1919 

George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D Woodbury, N.J. 

Joseph E. Holland Milford, Del. 

* T. Leonard Hoover New York City 

Rev. Thomas E. Martindale, D.D Salisbury, Md. 

Rev. Cornelius W. Prettyman, D.D Smyrna, Del. 

* G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. Luther T. Widerman, D.D Baltimore, Md. 

Lloyd W. Johnson Brooklyn, N.Y. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Committee: 

J. Henry Baker, Edward M. Biddle, Jr., Frank C. Bosler, George D. 
Chenoweth, Charles J. Hepburn, Robert W. Irving, James H. Morgan, 
Charles W. Straw; 

Edward W. Biddle, Chairman. 
Library Committee: 

Wilmer W. Salmon, C. Price Speer; 

James H. Morgan, Chairman. 
Committee on Trustees: 

James H. Morgan, Boyd Lee Spahr, William A. Stephens,* G. Lane 
Taneyhill; 

Horatio C. King, Chair man. 
Committee on Grounds and Buildings: 
Frank C. Bosler, Robert W. Irving; 

James H. Morgan, Chairman. 
Efficiency Committee: 

Joseph F. Berry, William P. Davis,* T. Leonard Hoover. Prank B. 
Lynch, Alexander Simpson, Jr., Robert Watt, Luther T. Widerman, 
Luther B. Wilson; 

( Jharles K. Zug, Chairman. 
Committee on (\>\w w Hall: 

Edward W. Biddle, Abram Hosier, Thomas E. Martindale, Wil- 
liam L. Woodcock; 

.lames II. Morgan, Chairman. 

Committee on Audit: 

Melville Gambrill, C. W . Prettyman; 

II. P. ( '.•union, ( 'hairman. 
* DeoeMed. 



FACULTY 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph.D. 

President 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph.D. 

Thomas Beaver Professor of English and American Literature 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 

Susan Powers Hoffman Professor of Mathematics 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 

WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Education 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS Sc.D. 

Professor of Biology 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER, Litt.D. 

Dean, and Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

CORNELIUS WILLIAM PRETTYMAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of German Language and Literature 

MONTGOMERY PORTER SELLERS, A.M. 

Professor of Rhetoric and the English Language 

LEON CUSHING PRINCE, A.M., LL.B. 

Professor of History 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

FORREST EUGENE CRAVER, A.M. 

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, and Physical Director 

GEORGE FRANKLIN COLE, A.M. 

Professor of Romance Languages 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 

GAYLARD HAWKINS PATTERSON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 

RUTER WILLIAM SPRINGER, A.M., LL.M. 

Associate Professor of English Bible and Greek Testament 

HERBERT WING, Jr., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Greek Language and Literature 

WILLIAM ALLEN ROBINSON, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English 

MELVIN HOWARD KELLEY, A.B. 

Instructor in Classics 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 
MERVIN GRANT FILLER 

Dean of the College 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS 

Secretary of the Faculty 

MISS SARAH K. EGE 
Lady in Charge of Metzger College 

MISS SARAH M. BLACK 

Secretary to the President 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Athletics 

Professors Stephens, Craver, and Prettyman 

Government and Discipline 
Professors Filler, Mohler, Pretttman, and Shadlngeh 

Graduate Work 
Professors McIntibe, Prince, \m> Gooding 

Library 
Professob McIntere. Cole, and Sellers 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 
June, 1915 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. Daniel L. Ennis Rev. Hamilton P. Fox 

Rev. Frank M. Thompson 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. J. W. Glover S. W. Dickson 

Rev. D. N. Miller Robert F. Rich 

Rev. J. H. Mortimer F. W. Crider 



NEW JERSEY 
Rev. Alfred Wagg Rev. L. L. Hand 

NEWARK 
Rev. D. F. Diefendorf Rev. J. W. Flynn 

NEW YORK EAST 
Rev. George Adams Rev. Ernest G. Richardson 

PHILADELPHIA 

Rev. J. F. Andrus Rev. W. C. Esbenshade 

Rev. J. C. Bieri Rev. J. J. Hunt 

Rev. I. T. Edwards 

WILMINGTON 

Rev. W. P. Taylor Rev. J. M. Kelso 

Rev. E. W. Jones 

WYOMING 
Rev. Judson N. Bailey Rev. W. E. Webster 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE 



1915 

In Cursu 

a.m. — master of arts 



Bashore, Luther Edward 

Dickinson, '13 
Beachley, Harry K. 

Dickinson, '86 
Davies, Russell T. 

Dickinson, '13 
Davis, David 

Lafayette, '12 
Earp, Carlyle Reede 

Dickinson, '14 
Evaul, Harry 

Dickinson, '12 
Grim, Tybirtis Hyson 

Dickinson, '09 
Gunter, William Arthur 

Dickinson, '13 
Hays, George M. 

Dickinson, '93 
Hemphill, John H. 

Dickinson, '12 
Humphrey, Walter Francis 

Dickinson, '12 
Kuller, Franklin Abram 

i >m kinson, '14 
Landis, William B. 

Dickinson, '11 
LiEDDBN, Roy 

Dickinson, '13 



McKeown, Harry, Jr., 

Dickinson, '13 
Martin, Thompson Starr 

Dickinson, '12 
Miller, S. Carroll 

Dickinson, '12 
Miller, John Roll a 

Dickinson, '11 
Myers, William Edward 

Dickinson, '02 
Peffer, George Warren 

Dickinson, '07 
Rowland, George H. G. 

Dickinson, '12 
Sellers, Ernest Harrison 

Dickinson, '12 
Smith, Raymond Fulton 
University of Pennsylvania, ' 
Smith, Thomas A., Jr. 

Dickinson, '09 
Tyson, Fred Aubrey 

Dickinson, '14 
Willey, Earl D. 

Dickinson, '13 
Williamson, Helen k \ i hkkim: 

Dickinson, '11 
Wilson, Jambs Johnston 
University of Colorado. '12. 



13 



A.B. 



Ai.u.k, Pai l P. 
I'.ui TON, Autiii i; \ 

on. 8. Russell 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

I JUL, \\ II I I \M \\ II A "\ 

\ a ws, ( ;. Winifred 

PaSICX. I? \"> II. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



11 



Fite, Alonzo S. 

HORNBERGER, HlESTER RlCHARD 

Laverty, Lawson Schwarz 
Laubenstein, Paul Fritz 



Lippincott, Haines Hallock 
Morgan, Hugh C. 
Mountjoy, Harry 
Neff, J. Luther 



Whiteley, Miriam Frances 



PH.B. — BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Borton, Everett Edward 
Bream, Margaret A. 
Coleman, Abraham Edward 
Cooper, William Edgar 
Crites, Bartholomew E. 
Day, Margaret R. 
Dexter, Mabel A. 
Eshelman, William Leininger 
Gates, Robert Calder 
Hagner, Leonard Gawthrop 
Hecht, Lester Sander 
Hodgson, Kathryn M. 
Howard, Elizabeth 
Kistler, Robert Benjamin 
Kistler, Walter William 
Malcolm, Gilbert 
Mason, Martha Phyllis 



Meily, Joseph 
Miller, Clinton H. 
Milligan, Robert D. 
Mitchell, Ina E. 
Nelson, Georgia Helene 
Neyhard, Helen B. 
Reiff, Roberta 
Ritchey, Irene C. 
Sellers, M. Ruth 
Sieber, D. Ralph 
Spitznas, James E. 
Wagg, Ethel 
Wallace, David M. 
Warfield, Clarence Griffith 
Watts, Chester Eppley 
Wilson, Stanley Gladstone 
Zimmerman, George Floyd 



SC.B.— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Jesse Ohrum Small 



LL.B. — BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Bashore, Luther Edward 
Bender, Thomas William 
Brown, G. Lewis 
Burns, John Albert 
Cunningham, Daniel W. 
Davis, David 
Evans, Elmer Lloyd 
Grim, T. H. 
Goldstein, Hyman 
Gunter, William Arthur 
Haberstroh, John J. 
Hemphill, John H. 



Ingram, Rowland Bradshaw 
Kearney, Joseph 
Martin, Thompson S. 
McKeown, Harry, Jr. 
Marosini, Harry Joseph 
Nowicki, Henry 
Parsons, John Willits 
Potter, Ernest Gordon 
Raker, Louis 
Smith, Raymond Fulton 
Still, Charles H. 
Wilson, James Johnston 



ADMISSION 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In 
all cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, 
and, if from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college 
will not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for work done in approved secondary schools are 
accepted, and students are admitted to the college on certifica- 
tion that the requirements for admission have been fully met; 
but certificates covering less than the full requirements may or 
may not be accepted, depending upon the amount of the short- 
age and the conditions under which the work was done. How- 
ever, students in arrears in preparation one full year's work in 
English, or more than one year's work in any other study, 
will be examined on all the work offered in the subject or sub- 
jects in which there is this deficiency. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation will not be accepted, 
but blank forms of certificates will be furnished on application, 
and it is required that these certificates be sent to the college 
by the principal of the school. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the college may or 
may not be accepted, depending upon the institution in which 
the advanced work has been done, and the branches of college 
work for which the certificate is offered. In other words, 
candidates for such advanced standing must demonstrate 
their preparation for the work of the advanced classes for which 
they apply. 

ON EXAMINATION 

Examinations for admission are held on Tuesday of com- 
mencement week, and on the day before the opening of the 
fall term. 

For advanced standing students musl show that they have 
covered in a satisfactory manner both the preparatory work 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 13 

for entrance to college and the studies previously pursued by 
the classes they propose to enter. 

ENTRANCE UNITS 

Requirements for admission are stated in terms of units, 
a unit being a course of study pursued for a year at least four 
periods of forty minutes each per week. At least fourteen and 
one-half such units are required for admission, and graduates 
from literary courses of approved high schools or academies 
ought to meet the requirements. 

Units Required of All Courses 

English 3 

History 2 

Mathematics: Algebra and Plane Geometry. . 2§ 

Additional Requirements for Courses 

Classical — 4 Latin and 3 Greek. 

Latin-Scientific — 4 Latin and 3 French or German. 1 

Philosophical — 

1. Requirements for Classical or Latin-Scientific Course. 

2. Eight units from the following: French, German, Latin, 

Science History and Mathematics, in addition to 
requirements for all courses. 
Seven units will satisfy this requirement if five of the 
seven are in two subjects and three of the seven 
are in Language other than English. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION BY SUBJECTS 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose 
work is notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, 
idiom, or division into paragraphs. 

Reading and Practice. — In the reading and study of English 
classics, the requirements are those recommended by the 
National Conference on College Entrance Requirements in 

1 Substitutes will be accepted for French or German, but one of them will be required 
during the college course. 



14 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

English. The work is usually covered by approved high schools 
of four-year courses of study. 

French. — The preparation in French should comprise 
careful drill in the rudiments of grammar, including the in- 
flection of the regular and the common irregular verbs, the 
inflection of adjectives, and the use of the participles and pro- 
nouns, constant attention being paid to pronunciation. Much 
time should be given to translations, both oral and written, 
of easy English into French. From six hundred to eight hun- 
dred pages of graduated texts should be read. Where much 
attention has been given to oral work, the amount of reading 
may be diminished. 

German. — Students offering German as an entrance re- 
quirement should be thoroughly familiar with the essentials 
of German Grammar; should be able to translate easy English 
into German; should be able to translate at sight easy German 
prose, and should be able to pronounce with a fair degree of 
accuracy. Candidates offering two years of German for admis- 
sion to college are expected to have read 200 pages of easy 
German; those offering three years are expected to have read 
400 pages besides reading at sight in class. From students who 
have been taught according to the Direct Method, a smaller 
amount of reading will be accepted. 

Greek. — Grammar; Xenophon's "Anabasis," four books; 
Homer's " Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day 
to day in preparation, is recommended, and ability to write 
simple Greek sentences is required. 

History. — Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States, 
The following works will indicate the amount required: Wester- 
mann's "Story of the Ancient Nations"; Botsford's "Ancient 
World"; or Botsford's "Orient and Greece" with Abbott's 
"Short History of Rome"; any good history of the United 
States, such as Channing's, McLaughlin's, MacMaster's, or 
Hart's. 

Latin. I. The Latin reading required of candidates for 
admission bo college, without regard to the prescription of par- 
ticular authors and works, shall be not less in amount than 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 15 

Caesar, " Gallic War," I-IV; Cicero, "The Orations against 
Catiline," "For the Manilian Law," and "For Archias"; 
Vergil, ".Eneid," I-VI. 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected 
by the schools from the following authors and works: Caesar, 
"Gallic War" and "Civil War"; Nepos, "Lives"; Cicero, 
"Orations" and " De Senectute " ; Sallust, "Catiline" and "Ju- 
gurthine War"; Vergil, "Bucolics," "Georgics," and "iEneid"; 
and Ovid, "Metamorphoses," "Fasti," and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recom- 
mended by the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; 
Algebra through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, 
including the solution of one hundred or more original exer- 
cises. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The college offers three parallel courses of study, each cover- 
ing four years: the Classical, the Latin-Scientific, and the 
Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are 
largely required; but in the last two years the work is mostly 
elective, as shown under Order of Studies. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per 
week, are required in the Freshman year, and are elective, 
three hours each per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Clas- 
sical course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by addi- 
tional studies in modern languages and science. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Scientific Course. — While the college offers no scientific 
Course, it allows the election of much science on the part of 
students, enough to cover half of the entire college course. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in 
May and must have the approval of class deans. Change in 
electives may be made for good reason with the consent of class 
deans during the first three days of the college year, but later 
changes can be made only on faculty approval. 



16 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Extra Elective Studies. — Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of 
the faculty, such additional work will not interfere with their 
regular work. No student, however, with a general average 
of less than seventy-five per cent, in any year can take more 
than one extra hour of Junior or Senior work the following year. 



SPECIAL COURSES 

In addition to these four regular courses of study leading to 
graduation and an academic degree, the college provides a 
Partial Course for students not planning for so long a college 
residence as would be required to complete the full course. It 
also makes provision by electives for much special prepara- 
tion along the line of the intended life work of students, espe- 
cially for those purposing to engage in business or to become 
lawyers, physicians, or teachers. 

Partial Course. — Students with uneven preparation may 
be admitted to the college for a Partial Course upon showing 
by examination or otherwise that they are prepared for col- 
lege work. No such student, however, will be admitted unless 
fully prepared in English, History, and one other subject of 
college preparation, nor with less than eleven units of college 
preparatory work. 

Business Course. — -The college recognizes the fact that an 
ever-increasing number of college-bred men are entering upon 
business careers, and to meet their needs it offers electives in 
preparation for their business careers, practical courses of 
cultural value. 

Modern languages are a valuable part of such a course in 
this day of close relations in all the business world, and in addi- 
tion to the ordinary French and German of the college course, 
Italian and Spanish have been added. Spanish especially is 
likely to be of increasing value as this country draws nearer 
in iis business life to the greal and rapidly developing countries 
of South America. 

At leasl one course in Economics is required of all candidates 
for a degree, and other similar courses arc elective in Modern 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 17 

Industrial Development, Industrial. Organization and Busi- 
ness Management, Principles of Sociology, Social and Eco- 
nomic Problems, and others. 

These electives as part of a cultural course are commended 
to the prospective business man. 

Engineering Course. — While many engineering schools admit 
students directly from the high school, some of them feel 
that it is a mistake both for the schools and for the students. 
Under this system engineers promise to be the least liberally 
educated of our professions. Law, medicine, and the ministry 
almost require part of the college course as preparation for their 
own professional studies. Engineers alone are educated largely 
without any college preparation, and there is beginning to be 
a protest against this on the part of the public and the wiser 
part of our body of youth. At Dickinson a considerable 
number of young people are taking the college course and pro- 
posing after that to take their professional course in engineering, 
giving to the subject one or two years as may be necessary, 
and having the liberal training as a basis for their professional 
work. If a young man is planning for a broad, cultural prepa- 
ration for life as well as for professional success, he ought 
certainly to take the liberal arts training and then his profes- 
sional specialty. The course in Dickinson College is arranged 
so as to prepare thoroughly for a prompt adjustment with pro- 
fessional engineering work for those choosing to take it after 
graduation. 

Law Course. — In preparation for law, as part of the college 
course three hours per week of law may be elected in the Junior 
year and five hours per week in the Senior year. By judicious 
election and a little extra work good students may thus save 
one year in their subsequent course in the School of Law, com- 
pleting the law course in two years after graduation instead of 
the three which would otherwise be required. An extra charge, 
however, is made when law is thus elected in place of college 
work. 

Medical Preparatory Course. — All good medical schools 
to-day require a good deal of preparation beyond that of the 
high school, ranging from the college degree to two years of 



18 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



college work; and most good medical schools also require that 
certain particular subjects shall be taken as preparation for 
their work. Students who propose to study medicine may 
shape their college course in such a way as to meet fully the 
requirements of any of the great medical schools. The com- 
pletion of the college course is strongly recommended for those 
who expect to study medicine, but for those who plan for less 
than this arrangements can be made whereby the requirement 
of some medical schools may be met in a shorter time. 

Teachers' Course. — The growing high school demand for 
college-trained teachers has found expression in the school codes 
of most of the progressive states, and on the completion of a 
college course covering certain electives in History and Prin- 
ciples of Education, and Psychology, young men and women 
are given certificates to teach in these states. The college thus 
prepares a great many teachers, and they are at once certified 
by state authorities and authorized to teach in their high schools. 
No ambitious young man or woman ought to consent to enter 
upon the teacher's career as a life work without the college 
degree. With this degree a grade of work is at once open to 
the teacher which would otherwise be closed probably for his 
or her entire career. The educational requirements of Penn- 
sylvania and neighboring states may be fully met by proper 
choice of electives in the college. 



INSTRUCTION 

It is the fixed policy of the college to be a teaching inst il ution, 
and its first aim is to furnish wise and expert teaching Leader- 
ship of the young people of the student body. To attain this 
end the college has steadily exalted the teacher, and its policy 
has been to have only mature men and experienced teachers in 
its corps of instruction, with no immature or inexperienced 
tutors. The college's teachers, therefore, must all have teach- 
ing experience elsewhere before they begin to do iis work. 

For the arrangement of t he college work in t he various regular 
courses of Btudy see Order <»i' Studies, pages L9 20; ami for 

further description <>f the work given in individual subjects 

see pages 21 37. 



ORDER OF STUDIES 1 



Freshman Class 



Classical Course 

English and Public Speak- 
ing A 

Greek B 

History A 

Latin A 

Mathematics A 



Latin-Scientific Course 

English and Public Speak- 
ing A 

French 1 one of B 

German J these D 

Greek 2 A 

History A 

Latin A 

Mathematics A 



Philosophical Course 

English and Public Speak- Greek 2 A 

ing A History A 

French A or B Mathematics A 

German A or D 



Sophomore Class 
Classical Course Latin-Scientific Course 



Required Studies 

Economics A 

English B 

History B 

Science 3 

Electives (Elect two) 

French 1 one of A 

German j these A 

Greek C 

Latin B 

Mathematics B 



Required Studies 

Economics A 

English B 

History B 

Science 3 

Electives (Elect two) 

French A or C 

German A or E 

Greek A or G 

Latin B 

Mathematics B 



1 For explanation of courses indicated by capitals see pp. 21-37. 

2 Greek may be substituted for French, German, or Latin. 

3 Biology C, Chemistry C, or Physics C. Another of the three sciences is required 
later in the course of all except Classical Course students. 



20 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Philosophical Course 

Required Studies Electives (Elect one) 

Economics A French 1 one of C 

English B German J these E 

French 1 one of B Greek A or G 

German j these B Mathematics B 

History B 

Science l 



Junior Class 
(Elect sixteen hours) 



Botany r C 

Chemistry 1 C, D, or F 

Economics B 

English Bible A 

English C and D 

French A, B, or C 

German A, B, E, or F 

Greek A, D, E, or H 

History B and C 



Italian A 

Latin C 

Law A 

Mathematics E and G 

Physics l C or F 

Psychology B 

Science l 

Sociology C, D, E and F 

Spanish A 



Senior Class 
(Elect sixteen hours) 

Astronomy K International Law F 

Chemistry I Italian A 



Economics B 

Education F 

English Bible B 

English E3 and F 

French H or ( ! 

( reology \ 

( i< nn:ui B, C, or F 

Greek I) and EorH 

History I) and E 



Latin D or E 

Law B, C, orD 

Mathematics E and (i 

Philosophy E 

Physics I' 

Sociology C, 1), E,and F 

Spanish V 

Zo&loirv ( I 



. note 3. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

BIBLE 
Associate Professor Springer 

The course in English Bible aims to determine the under- 
lying facts upon which the Scriptural narrative is based; and, 
in and through these facts, to form a correct view of the evo- 
lution of religious thought and of its relation to present-day 
religious and ethical ideals. To this end, the Bible itself is 
used as the text-book, original study therein being developed 
by quizzes, written summaries and analyses, short essays, and 
debates; and these studies are directed and supplemented 
by frequent lectures upon the Scriptural narrative, the text, 
contemporary history, and ethical and scientific side-lights, 
all aiming to bring the facts vividly to mind. The books 
are rearranged according to the order of the events narrated, 
and special attention is given, as these subjects are reached, 
to character-studies, literary form, textual accuracy, inspira- 
tion, the successive canons of Scripture, and kindred topics. 
The methods are inductive, the standpoint is modern, non- 
sectarian, constructive, orthodox, and the aim is rather to 
stimulate individual thought and investigation along safe 
lines than to reach predetermined or dogmatic conclusions. A 
two years' course, two hours per week; Old Testament in the 
junior year, and New Testament in the senior year. The 
courses are practically indivisible, and, for those electing only 
one year's work, a special course of outside reading will be 
necessary. 

BIOLOGY 
Professor Stephens 

A. Botany. Lecture Course. Lectures and recitations in 
Plant Morphology, 2 hours per week, first half-year. 

Lectures and recitations in Plant Physiology, 2 hours per 
week, last half-year. 

B. Botany. Laboratory Course. Two 2-hour periods 
per week throughout the year in Plant Morphology and Plant 
Physiology, including also a limited amount of field work in 
Plant Ecology. 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

C. Botany. Courses A and B combined. Four hours per 
week throughout the year. 

D. Zoology. Lecture Course. Lectures and recitations 
in Animal Morphology and Physiology, one hour per week 
throughout the year. 

E. Zoology. Laboratory Course. Two 2-hour periods 
per week the first half-year and one 2-hour period the last 
half-year in Animal Morphology. 

F. Zoology. Genetics. Lectures and recitations, one hour 
per week the last half-year. Prerequisite, Zoology D. and E. 

G. Zoology. Courses D, E and F combined. Three hours 
per week throughout the year. 

CHEMISTRY 
Professor Shadinger 

The chemical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the east 
wing of the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. The main labora- 
tory contains desks for ninety-two students. The smaller labora- 
tory for advanced work accommodates twenty-four. Each 
student is furnished with a desk and apparatus necessary for 
the performance of the experiments under the supervision and 
instruction of the professor. 

A. Lecture Course. An elective course in General Inor- 
ganic chemistry. The aim of this course is to cover the 
fundamental theoretical principles of the science in connection 
with the descriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements. 
The material presented in the text is supplemented by lecture 
experiments and explanations. Students arc given practice in 
stoichiometrical and other types of chemical problems. Throe 
hours per week. 

B. Laboratory Course. The laboratory work of the firsl 
year consists of the performance by each student of a Series 

of experiments, illustrating the important general principles 
and facts of the science the properties of the more important 

DOn-metallic elements, and the laws of chemical action. The 

details of manipulation of these experiments are given, but, 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 23 

with a view to cultivating the powers of observation. The 
student is required to observe carefully and describe clearly 
the results of each experiment. Two hours (counting as one) 
per week. 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Lecture Course. An elective course devoted to the 
principles of theoretical and physical chemistry, such as the 
kinetic-molecular hypothesis, theory of solution, atomic hy- 
pothesis, chemical equilibrium, theory of dissociation in solution, 
electrolysis, and the laws of mass action. This is followed 
by a study of the metallic elements based upon the periodic 
system. Prerequisite: course A. Two hours per week. 

E. Laboratory Course. Qualitative Analysis, to accompany 
course D. The usual course of preliminary work and analysis 
of simple and complex substances is pursued. The ionic theory 
and laws of mass action are applied to this work. Six hours 
(counting as three) per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. Lecture Course. Organic Chemistry. An elective course 
devoted to the principal classes of organic compounds, ali- 
phatic and aromatic, with emphasis upon class reaction and 
the structural theory. Prerequisite: courses A and B, and 
preferably D and E. Two hours per week. 

H. Laboratory Course. A course in Organic Preparations 
to accompany lecture course G. Laboratory work in the 
preparation and purification of compounds selected from the 
aliphatic and aromatic series for the illustration of important 
synthetic reactions; verification of the constants of these com- 
pounds; methods of organic analysis. Four hours (counting 
as two) per week. 

I. Courses G and H combined. 

J, K, and L. Laboratory Course. A course in Quantitative 
Analysis in its several branches. The work comprises a series 
of experiments which illustrate the fundamental principles 
of gravimetric and volumetric methods. The course is flexible, 
and great latitude will be allowed students manifesting interest 
and ability. Prerequisite: courses C and F. 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

J. Four hours to count as two. 
K. Eight hours to count as four. 
L. Twelve hours to count as six. 

ECONOMICS 

(See Social Science.) 

ENGLISH 

Professors Mclntire and Sellers and 

Associate Professor Robinson 

A. Rhetoric and Composition, based upon English Composi- 
tion in Theory and Practice, by Canby and others. Required 
of all Freshmen, four hours per week. Professor Sellers and 
Associate Professor Robinson. 

B. An introduction to the history of English literature 
with illustrative readings in class and in private reading courses. 
The text-book is supplemented by lectures and comments. 
Newcomer's "English Literature." "The Century Readings." 
Required of all Sophomores, two hours per week. Professor 
Mclntire. 

C. First half year, " Modern English, its Growth and Present 
Use." Second half year, The Poetry of Wordsworth; mainly 
a study of "The Prelude." Elective for Juniors and Seniors, 
two hours per week. Professor Sellers. 

D. Literary Criticism. Winchester's " Principles of Literal y 
Criticism" is used as a text-book and Newcomer and Andrews' 
"Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose" as supple- 
mentary reading and application. Elective to Juniors who 
have taken English B, two hours per week. Professor Mclnt ire. 

E. American Literature. Page's "The Chief American 
Poets" is used as a text-book, and is supplemented by Pan- 
's "Introduction to American Literature" (revised) and 

.'i private reading course. Elective to students who have 
takes English I), two hours per week. Professor Robinson. 

F. English Drama, consisting of lectures, readings, and 
reports. The readings are Largely in the works of Shakespeare 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 25 

and his contemporaries. Elective with the permission of the 
instructor to a limited number of Seniors who have taken Eng- 
lish D, two hours per week. Professor Mclntire. 

FRENCH 

(See Romance Languages.) 

GEOLOGY 
Professor Stephens 
A. Geology. An introduction to the science of Geology, 
both for students who are planning further scientific pursuits, 
and also for the larger class who wish merely to obtain an 
outline of the methods and principal results of the subject. 
Open to Seniors, two hours per week. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Prettyman 

A. Beginners 1 Course. German Grammar. German Prose. 
Practice in writing German. The work in this course is con- 
ducted in German according to the Direct Method. Three 
hours per week. 

B. A continuation of course A, and is open only to students 
who have completed that course. The method is the same, the 
work being conducted in German. Three hours per week. 

C. A continuation of B, and is open only to students who 
have completed that course. Three hours per week. 

D. German Prose and Poetry. Grammar and practice in 
writing German. Required of Freshmen who offer two years 
of German for admission to college. Four hours per week. 

E. History of German Literature. German Prose Composi- 
tion. This course is a continuation of course D and is intended 
for those who have completed that course. Three hours per 
week. 

F. History of German Literature. Lectures. Reading of 
representative works. Advanced Prose Composition. This 
course is open to students who have completed D and E; and 



26 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

may be elected a second year, as the works read are not the 
same in successive years. Three hours per week. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Associate Professors Springer and Wing, and Mr. Kelly 

A. Beginners' Greek. Emphasis will be laid on the acquisi- 
tion of a vocabulary and of a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of Greek grammar. During the spring term, the 
class will read selections from easy Greek prose. Four hours 
per week. 

B. Freshman Greek. Lysias, Plato, Euripides, and selec- 
tions from the Greek Anthology are read. This course is 
intended to lay the foundation for all further study of Greek. 
Students desiring to enter it are expected to have completed 
satisfactorily three years of Greek in preparatory school or 
to have passed satisfactorily in Greek G. Four hours per week 
for Freshmen; three hours for others. 

C. Sophomore Greek. Thucydides, iEschylus, Sophocles, 
Aristophanes. These authors are studied as representative 
expressions of the changing spirit of the Greek people. This 
course is necessary to those who wish further to pursue the 
study of Greek. Three hours per week. 

D. Advanced Greek. The work of this course changes from 
year to year. In 1916-17 it is planned to take up the study of 
Ancient Philosophy. A large part of the works of Plato and 
Aristotle will be read in translation. Portions of the Republic 
of Plato and certain other philosophical works will be read in 
the original. Three hours per week. 

E. New Testament Greek, Gospels. In the junior ami senior 
years, New Testament Greek may be elected by those who haw 
completed Greek courses A and G. During these two yean 
it is possible to read a large pari of the Greek New Testament. 
Textual criticism, sight reading, New Testament introduction 
and contemporary philosophy and history are given special 
attention. This course is taken up only in even-numbered 
years, alternating with course F. Two hours per week. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 27 

F. New Testament Greek, Epistles, etc. Similar to course E, 
alternating with it. Given in odd-numbered years. Two 
hours per week. 

G. Continuation of Greek A. Grammar. Composition. 
Reading of prose works and Homer. This course is planned 
to connect the work in beginning Greek with that of courses 
B, E, and F, for which it is a prerequisite. Three hours per 
week. 

H. Greek Civilization. This course is intended to give 
an introduction to the Greek ideals and character through the 
study of their life and of the products of their civilization. It 
is planned especially to meet the needs of those who have no 
knowledge of the Greek language, but may be taken by stu- 
dents who have not taken a course in Greek more advanced 
than Greek B. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours 
per week. 

HISTORY 
Professor Prince and Associate Professor Wing 

A. Ancient. The chief developments of the history of the 
Ancient World are studied both for their intrinsic interest and 
value and for the light they throw on modern civilization. 
Less attention is given to the political and military history of 
the Greeks than to the economic, social, artistic, and intel- 
lectual phases of their civilization. The course aims to give 
some acquaintance with proper methods of historical study as 
well as with the facts of history. Required of Freshmen. Two 
hours per week. 

B. American History. From 1750 to the close of Recon- 
struction. Required of Sophomores. Two hours per week. 

C. Civilization in Europe. A philosophic study of the 
history of Western Europe from the Fall of the Roman Empire 
to the close of the French Revolution. Open to Seniors. 
Two hours per week. 

D. 1 Spain and the Spanish- American Colonies. An analy- 
sis of the parallel processes of national expansion and decay 
from the accession of Charles I to the end of the reign of Charles 

1 D and E are given in alternating years. E is given in 1915-16. 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

III, supplemented by a survey of Spanish colonial development. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours per week. 

E. 1 Europe from the Congress of Vienna. The theme of 
this course is the struggle between monarchy and democracy 
as the central fact in the political history of Europe in the Nine- 
teenth Century. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours 
per week. 

F. International Law. The historical development of the 
comity of states and the nature and growth of the rules which 
govern their intercourse. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two 
hours per week. 

ITALIAN 
{See Romance Languages.) 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Filler and Mr. Kelly 

A. Freshman Latin. Selections from Sallust, Livy, Cicero. 
Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed and emphasis laid upon 

the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is given to 
translation in the class-room, and to the writing of Latin 
Prose. 

The course is largely devoted to drill-work, and aims to 
prepare the student for the intelligent and sympathetic reading 
of Latin literature in subsequent courses. Open to Freshmen. 
Four hours per week. 

B. Sophomore Latin. An outline study of the History of 
Latin Literature with illustrative readings. 

In the first half-year Classical Mythology is rapidly reviewed, 
with particular reference to its use in literature and art. 

In the second half-year the Manners and Customs of the 
Romans are considered. Open to Sophomores. Three hours 
per week. 

For those who have completed A and B one or two of the 
following courses will be given each year, according to the 
aeedc and desires of (hose electing advanced work. 

i D and B an given in alternating yeara E I given in i''ir>-io. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 

In courses C and D attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 

C. Vergil, Works, Life, and Literary Influence, with read- 
ings from the Eclogues and JEneid, VII-XIL Three hours 
per week. First half year. 

Horace, Satires and Epistles. Three hours per week. Second 
half-year. 

D. Cicero, Letters and Orations, with particular refer snce 
to his political career and the public life of the times. Three 
hours per week. First half-year. 

Lyric Poetry, particularly the poems of Catullus. Three 
hours per week. Second half-year. 

E. Tacitus and the other prose writers of the Silver Age. 
History and description of the Roman Government. Three 
hours per week. 

F. Selections from the Elegiac Writers of the Augustan 
Age and the chief poets of the Silver Age. More extended 
study of the History of Latin Literature. Three hours per 
week. 

LAW 
Dean Trickett 

A. Criminal Law, first two terms; Bailments, the third 
term. Open to Juniors. Three hours per week. 

B. Real Property. Three hours per week. 

C. Contracts. Two hours per week. 

D. Courses B and C combined. Open to Seniors. Five 
hours per week. 

E. Torts, first two terms; Domestic Relations, the third 
term. Three hours per week. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Landis and Adjunct Professor Craver 

A. Algebra, including Theory of Equations, Determinants, 
the Binomial Theorem, Choice, Logarithms, Interest and Annui- 
ties, etc. (Wentworth). Solid Geometry (Durell). Trigo- 
nometry (Crockett). Four hours per week. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

B. Analytic Geometry. The conies and a discussion of the 
general equation of the second degree (Fine and Thompson). 
Calculus. Differentiation, integration, maxima and minima 
curve tracing, areas, lengths, volumes, centers of mass, etc. 
(Hulburt). Thrae hours per week. 

C. Calculus. Partial derivatives, curve tracing, evolutes, 
envelopes. Taylor's Theorem, special methods of integration, 
etc. (Hulburt). Three hours per week, half-year. 

D. Differential Equations (Murray). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

E. Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions. The quadric 
surfaces and their more important properties, the general 
equation of the second degree, surfaces in general, and curves 
in space (C. Smith). Three hours per week, half-year. 

F. Projective Geometry (Cremona). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

G. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Computation of annui- 
ties, net premiums, loading, etc. (Moir). Three hours per week, 
half-year. 

H. Spherical Astronomy. Problems in latitude, longitude, 
time, etc. (Chauvenet and the American Ephemeris). Three 
hours per week, half-year. 

I. History and Teaching of Mathematics. A reading course 
in the works of Cantor, Ball, Cajori, Zeuthcn, Klein, Smith, 
Young, Schultze, etc. Three hours a week, half-year. 

Courses in the Theory of Numbers, Theory of Functions, 
Calculus of Probabilities, and other subjects have been given, 
and will be given whenever it seems desirable. Courses A 
and P> are given each year. Of the remaining courses two arc 

given each year, so that every student may follow at Least 
foui- of (hem, and the student who presents course A for entrance 
may pursue six of them. 

\\. Astronomy. An Introduction to Astronomy (Moulton). 
Two hours per week. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 
Professor Gooding 
B. Psychology. A brief review of the physiology of the 
nervous system is followed by a study of the more important 
phenomena of mental experience. The results of recent experi- 
mental psychology are taken up. No laboratory work is 
required, but problems are offered for solution from the direct 
experience of the pupils. " James' Psychology " (Briefer Course ) 
and Pillsbury's " Essentials of Psychology" are used as texts. 
Three hours per week. 

E. Philosophy. The Introduction to Philosophy forms the 
work of the first half-year, and the History of Philosophy the 
second half. The texts used are Paulsen's " Introduction to 
Philosophy," Descartes' "Meditations," Berkeley's "Prin- 
ciples," and Hume's "Enquiry." Three hours per week. 

F. Education. Methods of teaching elementary and sec- 
ondary school subjects. Observation of Schools, Psychological 
Principles, and History of Education. Three hours per week. 

The Educational Code of Pennsylvania requires of college 
graduates applying for a provisional certificate two hundred 
educational hours. These hours can be absolved by courses 
B and F. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Director Craver 

The course in physical training is planned as a two-year 
course. One hundred and twenty hours of work are required 
of all male students of the college during their first two years 
in college. 

During the early months of his connection with the college 
each student is subjected to a careful physical examination by 
the director. All physical defects are noted and corrective 
exercises suggested. 

The courses in physical training are as follows: 

I. Outdoor work — walking, running, jumping, etc., non- 
competitive. 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

II. Outdoor work — competitive sports — football, base- 
ball, track, tennis. 

III. Indoor work, calisthenics. 

IV. Indoor work — competitive games — basket ball, track 
athletics, gymnasium team. 

PHYSICS 
Professor Mohler 

A. Mechanics, Sound, Light and Electricity. Three demon- 
stration lectures or recitations per week. Text — Kimball's 
" College Physics." 

B. A laboratory course to accompany Physics A. Exact 
measurements in Mechanics, Sound and Light. One period of 
two hours per week. 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Electricity, Light, and Heat. Three demonstration 
lectures or recitations per week. 

E. A laboratory course on Light, Heat, Electricity, and 
Photography. One period of two hours per week. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. An advanced course in electrical measurement. Text 
— Franklin Crawford and McNutt. One period of two hours 
per week. 

Advanced laboratory work in Optics and Heat. Text — 
Mann's " Advanced Optics." Courses as follows: 

H. Two hours per week, counting as one. 

I. Four hours per week, counting as two. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Associate Professor Robinson 

Fall term. Public Reading. Drill in articulation, pro- 
nunciation, emphasis, pilch, inflection, pause, management 
of the voice, ease of bearing, gesture, etc. Once a week. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

Winter term. Public Speaking. Extemporaneous public 
speaking from outlines prepared in advanced. Declamations. 
One from each student during the term. Once a week. 

Spring term. Debating. Extemporaneous and prepared de- 
bates, the former with the use of outlines prepared in advance. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
Professor Cole 

FRENCH 

The instruction in this department aims mainly at such a 
knowledge of the language as will enable the student to read 
the prose and poetry of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nine- 
teenth centuries, without the necessity of translating, and with 
understanding and enjoyment. To this end, the Direct 
Method is employed, so far as conditions make it practicable, 
and French is progressively the language of the class-room. 
Throughout the course, persistent attention is given to pro- 
nunciation and sentence stress. There is a large amount of 
translation of easy sentences into French, and a still larger 
amount of question and answer in French on the texts read. 
Dictation exercises are frequent. Translation into English, 
at first in detail, aims primarily at making the meaning clear 
from the French point of view, and gradually gives place to 
question and answer in French, and to translation only of the 
difficulties and of new words and idioms. 

In course A, the reading is largely nineteenth-century prose. 
Some account is given of the authors read and of their place 
in the history of the literature. The reading in course B is 
mainly from representative prose writers of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries; but a considerable number of French 
lyrics are also read. Course C deals mainly, in class, with the 
great writers of the seventeenth century; it is supplemented by 
the reading, outside of class, of a considerable amount from 
modern writers. Courses B and C are intended to give a 
somewhat connected general view of the history of the lit- 
erature during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth 
centuries. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

A. Beginners' Course. Pronunciation. French Grammar. 
Conversation. Dictation. Practice in translating into English. 
Practice in writing French. This course is conducted partly in 
French. Three or four hours per week. 

B. Continues course A. A considerable amount of out- 
side reading is required. The work is conducted mainly in 
French. Four hours per week. 

C. Continues course B. A large amount of outside read- 
ing is required. The work is conducted in French. Three 
hours per week. 

D. Is intended to give further practice in understanding 
spoken French, and in French conversation. The recitations 
are conducted in French. It is open to those who, in the judg- 
ment of the teacher, have had sufficient training in French to 
profit by the work. Three hours per week, counting as two. 

ITALIAN 

A. 1 A rapid reading course, designed to enable the student 
to read and enjoy, without translation, modern Italian prose. 
Open ordinarily only to those who have had two years of col- 
lege German and French, or their equivalent. Three hours 
per week. 

SPANISH 

A. 1 A rapid reading course, designed to enable the student 
to read and enjoy, without translation, modern Spanish prose. 
Open ordinarily only to those who have had two years of col- 
lege German and French, or their equivalent. Two hours per 
week. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 
Professor Patterson 
The aim of the department is to afford a comprehension of 
the factors and processes by which the past has become the 
present in order to serve the student in finding the larger mean- 
ing of life in society and the means of advancing most Burely 
to the largest human achievement. 

1 S | mn in h A and 1 1 . 1 1 i : 1 1 1 A :uc y\\> n 111 altrriiatr yearn. Spanish ll niven in I ' M I '« 1 ." . 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

Phenomena of social, economic, political and religious life 
are observed in the evolution of institutions and in the rise 
and fall of nations, present conditions being kept constantly 
in view and American conditions being specifically analyzed 
so that the student may be qualified for intelligent, responsible 
citizenship in addition to receiving great cultural benefit from 
the investigations. 

The department affords a broad view of the field of knowledge, 
enabling the student to find a proper setting and perspective 
for his other studies, and at the same time find his own relation 
to the life of the world. 

A prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the Dickinson Chapter 
of the Chi-Omega Fraternity, is awarded to the young woman 
student who excels in Sophomore work in the department. 

A. Elements of Social Science. The evolution of society 
is traced so as to qualify the student for advanced study of 
social problems, principles, and policies and aid him in discerning 
the significance of contemporary social, economic, and politi- 
cal activities. An understanding of the nature of society is 
afforded in a study of the origin and development of (1) social 
institutions, such as speech, writing, the arts and sciences, 
marriage and the family, religions, etc.; (2) the maintaining 
institutions (Economic) viz. the tools and processes of produc- 
tion, industrial systems, economic stages, and the correlated 
development of economic concepts; (3) the perpetuating, con- 
trolling institutions (Political), political activities and co-or- 
dinated organization. Required of all Sophomores. Three 
hours per week throughout the year. 

B. Principles and Problems of Economics. During the 
first term the theory of value is developed in relation to consump- 
tion and production. The second term is devoted to the 
problem of the distribution of wealth and the effects upon social 
classes, including the theory of rent, interest, wages (the labor 
problem), profits (large fortunes, inheritance, etc.). During 
the third term, money, credit and banking and the fundamental 
principles of exchange are studied with reference to the re- 
quirements of a good system. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

■Three hours per week. 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

C. General Sociology. The first term is devoted to an ex- 
amination of the " bases for groupings, co-operations and con- 
flicts among men" in their feelings, purposes, etc., and of the 
influences of social surroundings upon the individual. The 
second term affords a survey of the foundations of social order 
and of the grounds, means, and system of social control, cul- 
minating in social democracy. During the third term social 
principles and policies are considered in relation to questions 
arising out of modern industrial organization, and changes in 
the family and population. A practical study of social func- 
tions and tendencies in adjustment to changing demands of 
society. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours per week. 

D. Social Economy. The economic waste involved in 
some phases of the treatment of the defective, dependent, and 
delinquent elements in society is investigated, and saner, 
more humane methods are considered. 

During the first term Defectives and Dependents are the 
subject of investigation with a view to discovering the causes, 
biological, social, etc., of such conditions in order to point out 
lines of constructive philanthropy. During the second term 
Delinquents are studied from the points of view of criminal 
anthropology and social conditions. Juvenile offenders, pre- 
ventive methods, and reform of criminal procedure are con- 
sidered. During the third term Fields of Social Service are 
presented as a means of showing the practical side of Sociology 
and enabling those interested to see fields of possible useful- 
ness and furthering social economy. Modern organized Social 
agencies, — Associated Charities, Social Settlements, Social 
Centers, School Gardens, Playgrounds, Welfare Work, Boy 
Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Christian Associations, the Ministry, 
Missions, etc., — are considered. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. Two hours per week, alternating from year to year 
with course E or F. 

E. 1 Social Politics. A survey of social ideals embodied in 
our organic and statutory Law, particularly as seen in labor 
legislation and recent penological legislation. The Last term 
is given to a survey of Fields of Public Service such as that of 

» Not riven 1816-17. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

City Manager, Civic Secretary, Truancy, Juvenile Probation, 
Health Officers, etc. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours 
per week. Alternating from year to year with course D. 

F. 1 Urban and Rural Community Life. A study of social 
conditions, marriage, the birth rate, the home, education, 
political units, resources, leadership, etc., in city and country. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours per week. 

MATERIAL EQUIPMENT 

The campus of eight acres was purchased of the Penns, and 
comprises a full square in the Borough of Carlisle. Upon and 
around it are grouped the principal of the following buildings: 

West College, "Old West" (1804), Y. M. C. A. Hall and 
dormitories. 

East College (1836), dormitories. 

Tome Scientific Building (1884), Museum and departments 
of Chemistry and Physics. 

Bosler Hall (1885), Chapel, Library (30,000 volumes), and 
Reading Room. 

Denny Hall (1905), Biological Laboratories, recitation rooms, 
Literary Society halls, and college administrative offices. 

Gymnasium (1884), large main room, running track, base 
ball cage, and bathing and dressing rooms. 

Metzger College, the dormitory for women, leaves little to be 
desired for its purpose. 

The Herman Bosler Biddle Memorial Athletic Field of over 
six acres is admirably suited to its purpose. 

Seven fraternity houses are occupied by fraternity members 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM 

The Library, available to all students under established 
regulations, consists of three distinct collections, nearly equal 
in size — that of the college proper, which is exceedingly rich 
in old volumes and in reference books, and those of the Belles 
Lettres and Union Philosophical Societies, accumulated by them 
during the century and a quarter of their existence. These 

i Not given 1916-17. 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

three libraries are one in organization, by the registration of 
the books of all in a single catalogue, on the card plan, which 
renders books in any of the collections easily available. 

Through the generosity of the late Hon. Alexander Patton, 
of Curwensville, who gave $10,000 for the purpose of starting 
a Library Fund, together with the cordial co-operation of the 
Alumni Library Guild, the college is able to make substantial 
additions, annually, to the resources of the Library. 

The reading-room in the Library is furnished with the best 
of reading-room appliances. Its files are supplied with repre- 
sentatives of the best secular and religious papers, while many 
of the best magazines and reviews are upon its tables. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

DEGREES 

The following degrees in cursu are conferred by the college: 

Bachelor of Arts. The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be 
conferred on those who complete satisfactorily the work of 
the Classical, Latin-Scientific, and Philosophical courses. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts in cursu will 
be conferred on those graduates of the college who shall have 
completed a course of study prescribed by the professors in the 
several departments and approved by the Faculty, and who shall 
have passed a satisfactory examination thereon at the seat of 
the college. A charge of twenty dollars will be made for the 
examination, one-half of which shall be payable when the student 
registers, which must be by October 15. 

Graduates of classes entering the college in 1915 or there- 
after will be under different regulations with respect to the 
Master's degree, said regulations to be announced in a subse- 
quent issue of the catalogue. 

Graduates of reputable colleges who complete in a satis- 
factory manner the course of the School of Law arc eligible 

for I tic degree of Master of Arts, in cursu. Application for 
information respecting the Muster's degree must be made in 
writing to Dr. B. 0. Mclntire, Chairman of Committee on 
I [raduate Work. 






DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Students are required to attend devotional services in the 
James W. Bosler Memorial Library Hall every morning, also 
the regular morning preaching services of the churches they 
elect. 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 
The government and discipline of the college are vested ex- 
clusively in the Faculty of the college, although the regulation 
of certain functions which have particular reference to the life 
of the student-body is left largely to the determination of the 
students themselves. Students are required to meet the re- 
quirements of good morals and good citizenship. Failure to 
do this may result in suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. Sus- 
pended students are required to go to their homes, and parents 
or guardians are notified of the fact. 

Report of attention to college duties and of the deportment 
of each student is made at the close of each term to students 
personally, if of legal years ; otherwise to parents or guardians. 
Special reports will be sent out whenever deemed necessary by 
the Faculty. 

Student Honor System. The students of the college under- 
take to see that there are honest examinations even without 
faculty supervision and have organized their own court for 
the purpose of enforcing their regulations in co-operation 
with the faculty. 

COLLEGE BILLS 

General charge to students $125 . 00 

Room-rent for the year $8 to 35 . 00 

Laboratory — Botanical, Chemical, Physical, or 

Zoological, for the year, each 12.50 

Athletic charge, unanimously recommended by 

students 8.00 

Charge for The Dickinsonian, unanimously recom- 
mended by students 1 . 00 

Electric light for dormitory $2.50 to 5.00 

Students presenting scholarships will be credited on general 
charges for their face value. 



40 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

METZGER COLLEGE 

For ladies residing in Metzger College the total charge is 
$375 per year, payable in three installments within ten days 
of the opening of each term, or within ten days of their arrival. 
This sum will cover all expenses for furnished rooms, bed- 
furnishing, lights, steam-heating, board, — everything, indeed, 
save personal laundry and books, and Athletic, Dickinsonian, 
and laboratory charges as above. All ladies non-residents of 
the town are expected to room in Metzger College. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS, REDUCTIONS, ETC. 

During the college year two bills are presented, one for the 
Fall term and the other for the Winter and Spring terms com- 
bined. The Fall term bill is for two-fifths of the academic 
year, and the combined Winter and Spring term bill is for the 
remaining three-fifths. The latter may be paid in two install- 
ments. 

The Fall term bill is due at the opening of the term, and its 
payment is required within ten days of said opening. 

The combined Winter and Spring term bill is due at the 
opening of the Winter term and its payment is required within 
ten days of said opening. If paid in two installments, the one 
for the Winter term and the other for the Spring term, payments 
are required within ten days of the opening of each term. 

N.B. — Every student connected with the college, and every 
student proposing entrance, must pay ten dollars each year 
before being admitted to the work of the college, the said sum 
to be credited on the college bill. 

When two students from the same family are present in the 
college at the same time, a reduction of ten per cent, is made. 

Students who room alone are charged the full rent of the 
room. 

Students who are permitted by the Faculty to absent them 
Belvee from college work for the whole or major portion of any 

term, and who present themselves for examination in said 

work, will be charged one-half of the regular rate for the period 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 41 

of their absence from college work, but no reduction on any 
term bill will be allowed for less than four weeks of continuous 
absence, for any cause, during any part of any term. For a 
period of continuous absence in excess of four weeks, a reduc- 
tion of one-half the pro rata, or weekly, charge will be allowed, 
provided the absence occurs through no fault of the student. 

All payments, when practicable, should be by check, draft, 
or money-order, made payable to John S. Bursk, Treasurer. 

Rooms. The rooms in the college are secured to the students 
during term time only. The occupants of rooms are held 
accountable for damage to them. Any student proved to 
be guilty of wilful destruction of, or damage to, college property, 
may be required to pay not only the cost of replacement, or 
repair, but also a fine as determined by the Faculty (not to 
exceed ten times the cost of repair), said fine to be placed to the 
credit side of the special damage account. When the students 
injuring property are unknown, the cost of repairs is assessed, 
toward the close of the college year, upon the whole body of 
students, as a special damage account. 

Failure to adjust college bills may result in exclusion from 
recitations, or from college, and no student can have honorable 
dismissal or certificate of advancement, until his bills have 
been duly adjusted. 

' GOWNS, HOODS, AND CAPS 

The college has adopted the regulations for academic caps 
and gowns suggested by the Intercollegiate Commission of 
1895. 

1. Undergraduates may wear on all fitting occasions a black- 
stuff gown of the Oxford shape, but with no hood. 

2. Bachelors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting 
occasions a black-stuff gown of the Oxford shape, with hood 
lined with red silk, crossed by a chevron of white, six inches in 
breadth. 

3. Masters of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting 
occasions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as for 
Bachelors. 



42 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

4. Doctors of Dickinson College may wear on all fitting 
occasions a black silk gown of the Oxford shape, with hood as 
for Bachelors, trimmed around the exterior edge with a cord 
or with a band, not more than four inches wide, of silk, satin, 
or velvet, distinctive of the department to which the degree 
pertains, as follows: Doctor of Literature, white; Doctor of 
Divinity, scarlet; Doctor of Laws, purple; Doctor of Phi- 
losophy, blue; Doctor of Science, gold-yellow. 

With the gown will be worn the Oxford cap, of serge for 
undergraduates and of broadcloth for graduates, with black 
tassels, except the cap of the doctor's degree, which may be of 
velvet with tassels in whole or part of gold thread. 

5. Members of the Board of Trustees shall be entitled, 
during their term of office, to wear the gown and cap of the 
doctor's degree, with the hood appropriate to the degree that 
they severally have received. Members of the Board of 
Trustees, or of the Faculty, who have received degrees from 
other universities or colleges, shall be entitled to wear the cos- 
tume appropriate to the same degree from Dickinson College, 
so long as they shall retain their official connection with the 
college. The President of the college may adopt such dis- 
tinctive costume or badge as he shall choose, not inconsistent 
with the foregoing regulations. 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The Belles Lettres and the Union Philosophical Societies, 
purely literary in their character, nearly coeval with the col- 
lege, have been maintained in continuous operation throughout 
most of its history; and Harman Society, the organization of 
the young ladies, was founded in 1896. Not the least of the 
advantages of college residence is the special training secured 
in these societies. The halls in which they meet, ample in 
size and thoroughly equipped, are hardly surpassed anywhere. 
For nearly twenty years the work and worth of these societies 
have been recognized in the following regulations: 

1. No student shall enter any public literary or oratorical 
contest in connection with the college who shall not have been 
a member of one of the literary societies for at least three- 
fourths of the time of his or her connection with the college. 

2. No student shall have any public part in the exercises of 
Commencement Day who shall not have been a member of 
one of the literary societies for at least one-half of the time 
of his or her connection with the college. 

3. No student shall be graduated from the college who shall 
not have made satisfactory adjustment of financial obligations 
to the literary society of which he or she has been a member. 

BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY 

Robert E. Woodward, '17 President 

Oris J. Baker, '17 Vice-President 

Thomas J. Frailey, Law, '18 Recording Secretary 

M. Wilson Harris, '18 Corresponding Secretary 

Michael F. Davis, '17 Treasurer 

Reuben L. Sharp, '19 Clerk 

Charles E. Davis, '19 Chairman, Executive Committee 



44 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

UNION PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 

Raymond R. Brewer, '16 President 

Ralph M. Bashore, '17 Vice-President 

Clark L. VanAuken, '16 Recording Secretary 

George W. Moyer, '19 Corresponding Secretary 

George C. Hering, '17 .... Treasurer 

Thomas V. Curran, '16 Censor 

Harry L. Price, '17 Critic 

Gilbert White, '17 Clerk 

Edmund G. Young, '17 Sergeant-at-Arms 

PaulM. Dutko, '17; Michael Morris, '19; Carl B. Shelley '17 

Executive Committee 
HARMAN SOCIETY 

Anna M. Shuey, '16 President 

Miriam G. Evans, '17 Vice-President 

Lillian M. Kell, '18 Secretary 

Nora M. Mohler Treasurer 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 
These Associations in the college are well organized, and do a 
most useful work. A large number of the students are actively 
connected with them and are zealous to forward their work. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Raymond R. Brewer, '16 Presidt nt 

Gaither P. Warfield, '17 Vice-President 

Elbert L. Davies, '17 Recording Secretary 

Thomas R. Jeffrey, '16 Treasurer 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Anna M. Shuey, '16 President 

Helen Jones, '17 ' Vice-President 

Mary C Bobb, '17 Secretary 

Belle Gardner, '18 Treasurer 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 
The trustees, in 1891, ordered thai the alumni be divided 
info four geographical districts, centering respectively in Balti- 
more, Philadelphia, Wilmington, mid Carlisle, and thai the 
alumni of each districl ••1<'<'( a trustee, to be known as an Alumni 
Trustee, having all privileges of trustees of the college. These 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 45 

District Alumni Associations meet at such times as they may 
elect. There are also a General Alumni Association and various 
local associations. 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D President 

J. Henry Baker, Esq Vice-President 

Montgomery P. Sellers Secretary 

George L. Reed, Esq Treasurer 

(Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa.) 

BALTIMORE ASSOCIATION 

Carl F. New President 

Rev. Edward Hayes First Vice-President 

William H. Davenport Second Vice-President 

Rev. Martin L. Beall Treasurer 

Rev. Benjamin I. McGowan Recording Secretary 

Louis A. Tuvin Corresponding Secretary 

* G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D Representative in the Board of Trustees 

CARLISLE ASSOCIATION 

Alexander H. Ege President 

Mervin G. Filler Secretary and Treasurer 

(Address of Secretary, Carlisle, Pa.) 

PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION 

Henry C. Longnecker, D.D.S President 

George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D Vice-President 

Thomas S. Lanard, Esq Secretary and Treasurer 

Executive Committee 
Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq.; Frysinger Evans, Esq.; Charles K. Zug, 

Esq.; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq.; Rev. Thomas W. Davis; 

William P. String. 

Charles J. Hepburn, Esq Representative in the Board of Trustees 

(Address of the Secretary, 803 Bailey Building, Philadelphia, Pa.) 

WILMINGTON ASSOCIATION 

Henry P. Cannon President 

Thomas N. Rawlins Vice-President 

Harry K. Fooks Secretary 

Henry P. Cannon Representative in the Board of Trustees 

* Deceased. 



46 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

DICKINSON CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY 

C. G. Cleaver President 

Milton Kistler Vice-President 

L. W. Johnson Secretary 

Frank H. Hertzler Treasurer 

Executive Committee 
Rippey T. Sadler, William J. Shearer, Charles M. Baker, Thomas 
J. Towers, E. H. Mish 

THE ALUMNI FUND COMMITTEE 
Hon. Edward W. Biddle, '70; Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80; John M. 
Rhey, Esq., '83; William D. Boyer, Esq., '88; Charles J. Hepburn, 
Esq., '92; J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; William A. Jordan, Esq., '97; 
Harry I. Huber, Esq., '98; Caleb E. Burchenal, Esq., '00; *T. Leon- 
ard Hoover, '00; Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq., '00; Lewis M. Bacon, Jr. '02; 
Rev. Frank D. Lawrence,- '02. 

Henry P. Cannon, '70, Bridgeville, Del Chairman 

George D. Chenoweth, '68, Woodbury, N.J Vice-Chairman 

Robert W. Irving, Esq., '97, Law, Carlisle, Pa Secretary 

C. W. Prettyman, '91, Carlisle, Pa Treasurer 

Executive Committee 
Charles K. Zug, Esq., '80, Chairman; Charles J. Hepburn, Esq., '92; 
J. Henry Baker, Esq., '93; T. Leonard Hoover, '00; Lewis M. 
Bacon, Jr., '02; Rev. Frank D. Lawrence, '02; Boyd Lee Spahr, 
Esq., '00. Secretary, 1242 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

In September, 1886, the Alpha Chapter of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society, the first in the state of Pennsylvania, was 
organized. Only students finally passed for graduation arc 
eligible to membership, and of these only those of high class 
standing or giving promise of unusual achievement. Graduates 
of former years, not below the first fourth of their classes, and 
men of eminence in professional life; arc also eligible to member- 
ship. 

Henri F. Whiting Preaidenl 

MiMtviN (1. Filler Vioe-Pretidml 

JOHN F. MOHLBR Secretary 

FORREST I . < i; \\ SB Treasurer 

* I ><■■ i 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 47 



THE DICKINSON LIBRARY GUILD 

The Dickinson Library Guild, composed of alumni and friends 
of Dickinson College, is organized for the purpose of creating 
a permanent endowment for the college Library, and member- 
ship in the Guild consists of those who make an annual contribu- 
tion to the endowment fund of the library. The membership 
is of five classes, or groups, as follows: 

Class A, all who contribute ten or more dollars per year. 
Class B, all who contribute from five to ten dollars per year. 
Class C, all who contribute three dollars per year. 
Class D, all who contribute two dollars per year. 
Class E, all who contribute one dollar per year. 

In accordance with the action of the Board of Trustees of 
the college, all moneys contributed shall become a part of the 
permanent endowment fund of the library, the proceeds of 
which shall be devoted to the sole purpose of purchasing books 
by the Faculty Committee on Library. The current expenses 
of the organization shall be otherwise provided for. 

Directors 

Bradford O. McIntire President 

Mervin G. Filler, '93 Secretary and Treasurer 

John M. Rhey, Esq., '83; Geo. M. Hays, '93; William G. Stephens, '16. 



STUDENT ASSEMBLY AND SENATE 

For some years the students in their organized capacity have 
exercised limited government over some of their own internal 
interests. This student government has applied especially 
to relations of one class with another, but has also influenced 
the life of the entire student-body. 

The student organization is called the Student Assembly, 
and the elected governing body is called the Senate. 

Senate: Thomas R. Jeffrey, '16, President; Perry F. Prather, '16, 
Vice-President; Robert L. Ganoe, '16; Daniel F. Graham, '16; 
Charles H. Harman, '16; George C. Herinq, Jr., '17; Robert L. 
Myers, '17; Homer M. Respess, '17; Gaither P. Warfield, '17; 
Andrew Blair, '18, Sophomore Class President; W. Miller Cook, '19, 
Freshman Class President. 



48 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

In the autumn of 1908 several of the more musically inclined 
students set on foot a movement which has resulted in the 
present College Band. Originally simply a means of helping 
on the singing at the football games, it has outgrown its original 
purpose and is now one of the regular musical organizations of 
the college. It furnishes the music for college functions, and 
frequently gives concerts on the campus. Any student with 
musical ability is eligible to membership. Instruction is 
provided for beginners, and students are encouraged to take 
up this sort of work. 

Lloyd E. Taylor, 16 President 

Fred E. Goodhart, '17 Director 

Raymond D. Adams, '18 Assistant Director 

Clark L. VanAuken, '16 Treasurer 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

David H. Kinley, Law, '17 President 

Robert E. Woodward, '17 Vice-President 

C. Ross Willis, '19 Secretary 

Elbert L. Davies, '17 Treasurer 

Advisory Committee: Prof. Henry M. Stephens, Chairman, Carlisle; 
Prof. Forrest E. Craver, Secretary, Carlisle; Prof. Cornelius W. 
Prettyman, Carlisle; Prof. Walter H. Hitchler, Carlisle; Prof. 
Joseph P. McKeehan, Carlisle; E. M. Biddle, Jr., Esq., Carlisle; 
Frank Sellers, Esq., Carlisle; Raphael S. Hays, Esq., Carlisle; 
Edward M. Biddle, Esq., Philadelphia; William D. Boyer, Esq., 
Scranton; Harry K. Hoch, Esq., Wilmington, Del.; Guy Carleton 
Lee, Esq., Carlisle; Henry W. Storey, Esq., Johnstown. 

William F. Farrell, Law, '18 Football Manager 

C. Wendell Holmes, '18 Asst. Football Manager 

( JhARLBS 1 1. Uhitz, '16 Jiaselxdl Manager 

( rEOBGE C. Hering, '17 Asst. Jiaselxdl Manager 

Jambs II. Courtney, Law, '10 Track Manager 

A. M \i BICE PALM, '18 \sst. Track Manager 

SOMBB M. RjJSPBSS, '17 Manager Indoor Sports 

EaRPBB A. PBICB, '18 \sst. Manager Indoor Sports 

ElOBBBT li. MTBBS, .Jit. '17 Captain Football Team 

GEORGE ( !. MOOBB, '15 Captain Hasdxdl 'ieatn 

A.. Mai rice Palm, 'is Captain Track 

R.OBBRT E. WOODWABD. '17 Captain Tennis l\ am 



PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND BENE- 
FICIARY FUNDS 

PRIZES 

Belles Lettres Society Prize. — As an incentive to improve- 
ment in composition and declamation at an early stage in the 
college course, the literary societies have each instituted a 
yearly contest therein for their respective members from the 
Sophomore class. All the members of this class in the Belles 
Lettres Society have the option of competing, and a gold 
medal is awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest degree 
of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, as 
decided by judges chosen by the society. 

The Cannon Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Henry 
P. Cannon, '70, Bridgeville, Del., is awarded to that member 
of the Sophomore class who shall pass the most satisfac- 
tory examination in the Mathematics of the Sophomore year, 
together with the original Geometry of the Freshman year. 

Awarded to Nora M. Mohler, Carlisle. 

The Chi Omega Fraternity Prize of twenty-five dollars, the 
gift of the Dickinson chapter, to be awarded to the young 
woman student who excels in Sophomore Economics. First 
offered 1913-14. 

Awarded to Elma May Houseman, Carlisle. 

The Clemens Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the 
Rev. Joseph Clemens, '94, Chaplain, United States Army, is 
awarded annually to the student of the Junior class, proposing 
the work of the ministry, who writes the best essay, or sermon, 
upon some subject bearing upon the work of foreign missions, 
the essay or sermon not to exceed fifteen hundred words, and 
to be presented to the President of the college not later than 
May 1 of each year. A copy of the winning essay or sermon, 
in typewritten form, shall be forwarded to the donor of the prize. 

Awarded to Raymond R. Brewer, Sylvan. 



50 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The Charles Mortimer Giffin Prize in English Bible. — This 
prize, established in memory of the Rev. Charles Mortimer 
Giffin, D.D., is based upon a fund contributed by his wife, 
and permanently invested, the income of which shall be used 
as an award for work done under suitable conditions in the 
study of The English Bible by a young man who may be a 
member of either the Junior or Senior class. One of the con- 
ditions governing the award shall be the writing of a competitive 
essay, and that one being adjudged the best for comprehensive- 
ness of survey, independence of judgment, and excellence of 
style shall be given the prize. A typewritten copy of the prize- 
winning essay shall be furnished to the donor. 

First offered 1913-14. 

Awarded to Lawson S. Laverty, Harrisburg. 

The Johnson Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Joseph 
H. Johnson, '05, of Milton, Pa., is awarded to that one of the 
literary societies of the college whose members shall excel in 
debate, said debate to be conducted according to the terms pro- 
posed by the Faculty, and adopted by the respective societies. 

Awarded to the Union Philosophical Society, represented by 
Robert B. Kistler, Minersville; Leonard G. Hagner, Wil- 
mington, Del.; Homer M. Respess, Baltimore, Md. 

The McDaniel Prizes. — Delaplaine McDaniel, Esq., late 
of Philadelphia, provided for the founding of certain scholar- 
ships, to be awarded on the ground of excellence in scholarship. 
The sum of five thousand dollars was given the college in 
trust, with provision that three prizes, equal in amount, be 
constituted from the annual income, and offered yearly to be 
competed for by the members of the Freshman and Sophomore 
classes, and with provision, further, thai, two of these prices 
be awarded, one each, to the I wo members of the former class, 
and the remaining prize to the member of the latter class who, 

in such w:iv as the authorities of the college prescribe, attain 
the highest average of excellence in the work of these classes 
respectively. 
Freshman class — Firsl price to Harold II. Bixler, Carlisle. 

Second prize to Klva R, Lippi. I lanisluirn;. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 51 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Nora M. Mohler, Carlisle. 

The Miller Prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of Charles 
O. Miller, Esq., of Stamford, Conn., is awarded to that member 
of the Freshman class who shall excel in forensic declamation. 

Awarded to Francis W. Godwin, Georgetown, Del. 

The John Patton Memorial Prizes, four in number, of 
twenty-five dollars each, one for each of the college classes, 
offered by the late Hon. A. E. Patton, of Curwensville, as a 
memorial to his father, Gen. John Patton, for many years a 
faithful friend and trustee of the college, are awarded according 
to conditions established for the Patton Scholarship Prizes 
maintained for many years by his honored father. 

Senior class — Awarded to Lawson S. Laverty, Harrisburg. 

Junior class — Awarded to Anna M. Shuey, Bellefonte. 

Sophomore class — Awarded to Robert E. Woodward, Fort 
Huachuca, Arizona. 

Freshman class — Awarded to M. Mabel Clark, Harrisburg. 

The Pier son Prizes for oratory, established by Daniel Pierson, 
Esq., of Newark, N.J., gold and silver medals, are offered each 
year to be competed for by members of the Junior class in a 
public oratorical contest, which contest has for years been 
placed among the exercises of Commencement week. 

Gold Medal — G. Dickson Garner, Harrisburg. Silver 
Medal — George W. Bradley, Camden, N.J. 

The Rees Prize of twenty dollars, the gift of the Rev. Milton 
S. Rees, D.D., Rochester, N.Y., is awarded to that student 
who shall excel in English Bible. 

Awarded to Miriam F. Whiteley, Williamsburg. 

The James Fowler Rusling Scholarship Prize of fifty dollars; 
the gift of Gen. James Fowler Rusling, LL.D., '54, Trenton, 
N.J., is awarded to that member of the Senior class who, at 
the end of a four years' course, shall be found to excel in scholar- 
ship and character, as determined by the Faculty. 

Awarded to Hiester R. Hornberger, Sinking Spring. 

The Smith Prize of thirty dollars, the gift of Robert Hays 
Smith, '98, of San Francisco, Cal., is awarded as a second prize, 



52 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

to be distributed equally among the members of the winning 
team in the annual Inter-society debate. 

Awarded to the winners of the Johnson prize above — Robert 
B. Kistler, Leonard G. Hagner, and Homer M. Respess. 

Union Philosophical Society Prize. — As an incentive to 
improvement in composition and declamation at an early stage 
in the college course, the literary societies have each instituted 
a yearly contest therein for their respective members from the 
Sophomore class. All the members of this class in the Union 
Philosophical society have the option of competing, and a gold 
medal is awarded the contestant exhibiting the highest degree 
of excellence in the arts to which the competition relates, as 
decided by judges chosen by the society. 

The Wagg Prize, a gold medal, the gift of A. H. Wagg, '09, 
of New York, will be awarded to that member of the class in 
American History who shall present the best competitive essay 
on an assigned subject pertaining to the life and public services 
of some distinguished American closely related to Dickinson 
College as founder, trustee, executive, professor, or alumnus. 

Awarded to Daniel F. Graham, Harrisburg. 

The Walkley Prize of fifteen dollars, the gift of W. R, Walk- 
ley, D.C.L., in memory of his only son, Winfield Davidson 
Walkley, who died March 11, 1903, is awarded as a second prise 
to that member of the Freshman class who shall excel in decla- 
mation, either forensic or dramatic. 

Awarded to Agnew 0. Roorbach, Cape May Court Bouse, 
N.J. 

P>KNEFICIARY FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of funds and scholarships have been established 
in various ways by friends of education in general and of the 
college in particular, and arc awarded Largely by the donors or 
by Hie president to such students as may be in need of financial 
help. If is doubtful whether the same amount of money 
expended in any other way would accomplish a greater service 
in the cause of education than these small sums used to supple- 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 53 

ment the insufficient means at the command of worthy young 
people seeking an education. It is hoped that their number 
may be largely increased by men and women concerned to do 
good with their means. 

The Alumni Loan Fund of fifty dollars, contributed by an 
alumnus, to be loaned from year to year to students in need of 
temporary help, to be repaid within a year and again loaned. 

The Bodine Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by George 
I. Bodine, Jr., Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Arthur Milby Burton Scholarship of fifty dollars, estab- 
lished by Miss Mary R. Burton, for the education of worthy 
young men for the ministry, preference being given to appli- 
cants residing within the limits of the Philadelphia Conference. 

The Chandler Scholarship of twenty-five dollars, the gift of 
D. Harry Chandler, of Vineland, N.J. 

The Nathan Dodson Cortright Memorial Scholarship of fifty 
dollars established by Mrs. Emma L. Keen, of Philadelphia, 
as a memorial to her father, Nathan Dodson Cortright, is 
awarded annually to young men preparing for the ministry. 

The Smith Ely Scholarship, endowed by the Hon. Smith Ely, 
of New York City, in the sum of eleven hundred dollars, stu- 
dents from New York City and vicinity having prior claim. 

The Freeman Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by 
Frank A. Freeman, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The John Gillespie Memorial Scholarship, interest on one 
thousand dollars, the gift of Miss Kate S. Gillespie, daughter of 
John Gillespie, Esq., late of Philadelphia, as a memorial to her 
father. 

The Lockyer Scholarship of fifty dollars, established by Mark 
B. Lockyer, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Theodore F. Miller Scholarship of fifty dollars, the gift 
of Theodore F. Miller, Esq., of Philadelphia. 

The Valeria Schall Scholarship of twenty-five dollars is 
used in assisting such young men as, in the estimation of the 



54 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

President and Faculty of the college, are of good character, 
scholarly habits, and deserving of assistance, and who are 
approved candidates for the Christian ministry. 

The Charles T. Schoen Scholarships, ten in number, of fifty 
dollars each, established by Charles T. Schoen, Esq., of Phila- 
delphia, are awarded annually to such young men and women 
as may be designated by the donor or by the President. 

The A. Herr Smith Scholarship, endowed, averaging one 
hundred dollars per year, is the gift of the late Miss Eliza E. 
Smith, of Lancaster, in memory of her brother, the late Hon. 
A. Herr Smith. 

The Cornelia Thumm Scholarship, the annual interest on 
nine hundred and fifty dollars, the legacy of the late Mrs. 
Cornelia A. Thumm, of Philadelphia, is used to aid such stu- 
dents as may be designated by the President. 

The Ella Stickney Willey Scholarship of fifty dollars, estab- 
lished by Mrs. Ella Stickney Willey, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is 
awarded annually to such students as may be designated by the 
donor or by the President. 

The Rev. William Wood Scholarship of fifty dollars, the 
gift of Miss Sarah Wood, of Trenton, N.J., is awarded annually 
to such students as may be designated by the donor or by the 
President. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The trustees have authorized the founding of endowed 
scholarships of one thousand dollars each, whose object is 
to aid in extending the privileges of the college to young men 
of promise otherwise unable to command them. 

Such scholarships may be constituted as follows: 

1. The donor of each scholarship shall have the privilege of 
naming it, and of prescribing the conditions on which it shall 

be awarded. 

2. Scholarships may be maintained by the annual payment 
of fifty dollars, as interest, until the principal sum of one thou- 
sand dollars is paid. They lapse, of course, when the interest 
fails, unless the principal or interesl <>u the same has been paid. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 55 

3. Churches contributing one thousand dollars each, may, 
if they desire it, place upon that foundation the sons of their 
ministers, or, in lieu of that, may nominate some other can- 
didate to receive its avails. 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the " Trustees of Dickinson College, 
in the County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the 
sum of dollars; and the receipt of the Treas- 
urer thereof shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for 
the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following. 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Dickinson College, in 
the County of Cumberland, in the Borough of Carlisle," in- 
corporated under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the 

following land and premises, that is to say , 

to have and to hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the 
said Board, its successors and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, 
or knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify 
the President of the college, Carlisle, Pa., and, if practicable, 
to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes of 
the testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, 
or the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endow- 
ment of a scholarship, are requested to make specific mention 
of the same in the will provision. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

C. — Classical Course. 
L. S. — Latin-Scientific Course. 
Sc. — Scientific Course. 
Ph — Philosophical Course. 
P. — Partial course not leading to graduation. 
When no other state is mentioned residence is in Pennsylvania. 

SENIORS 
Name Course Residence 

Allison, Albert H Ph Shippensburg 

Bradley, George W L. S Camden, N.J. 

Brewer, Raymond R C Sylvan 

Bucher, Mabel V L. S Carlisle 

Craig, Margaret A L. S New York City 

Curran, Thomas V L. S Minersville 

Ganoe, Robert L L. S Chambersburg 

Garner, G. Dickson Ph Harrisburg 

Graham, Daniel F Ph Harrisburg 

Groome, Walter G Ph Portage 

Harman, Charles H L. S Youngwood 

Hart, F. Leslie Ph Pottstown 

Hart, U. Shuman C Harrisburg 

Hodgson, Robert S L. S Felton, Del. 

Hoff, Samuel H Ph Lykens 

Jeffrey, Thomas R C Pen Argyl 

Kern, Russel B C Emerald 

Lamborn, Louis Emmor Ph Wilmington, Del. 

Lauman, Helen D L. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Lepperd, J. Wayne L. S Carlisle 

Lippincott, Samuel T C Swathmore 

Lutz, Sylvia P Ph Carlisle 

MacGrcgor, Clarence Sc Carlisle 

MacGregor, Thomas W Ph Carlisle 

McMahon, Mary J L. S Harrisburg 

McWhinney, Russell R L. S Homesi cad 

Massey, Reynolds C L. S Goshen, N.J. 

Meloy, Olga M Ph Harrisburg 

Michael, Raymond S Ph Harrisburg 

Mohler, Anna M L. 8 Mt. Holly Springs 

Moose, ( toorge C Ph Luthereburg 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 57 

Name Course Residence 

Needy, A. Norman Ph Waynesboro 

Nieman, Benjamin L Ph Northampton 

Prather, Perry F L. S Clear Spring, Md. 

Reisler, Herbert S L. S Nottingham 

Reitz, Charles H L. S Mount Carmel 

Rogers, D. Paul Sc Harrisburg 

Rupert, Beatrice E L. S Carlisle 

Rupp, David Mohler C Shiremanstown 

Shelley, Daniel H L. S Mechanicsburg 

Shope, Edward P. L Ph Harrisburg 

Shuey, Anna M Ph Belief onte 

Smith, C. Hammond Ph Williamsport 

Stephens, William Ganoe L. S Carlisle 

Stevens, John M C Georgetown, Del. 

Taylor, Lloyd, E L. S East Stroudsburg 

Van Auken, Clark L C Blairstown, N.J. 

Wiener, Amelia K L. S Carlisle 

Woods, Agnes S L. S Carlisle 

JUNIORS 

Bagenstose, Abner H L. S Orwigsburg 

Baker, Florence D L. S Mt. Holly Springs 

Baker, Oris J C Curwensville 

Bashore, Ralph M L. S Tremont 

Bobb, Mary C L. S Carlisle 

Bolowicz, Felix W L. S Larksville 

Brookmire, James G L. S Port Carbon 

Compton, Lewis V Ph Dias Creek, N.J. 

Corson, Fred P C Millville, N.J. 

Courtney, Berkeley L. S Baltimore, Md. 

Dalton, Allan B Ph Chester 

Davies, Elbert L L. S Montrose 

Dietrich, Mark S C Carlisle 

Dolby, Delbert L L. S Seaford, Del. 

Donelson, Emory E C Saxton 

Dougherty, Mary M Ph Plainfield 

Dutko, Paul M L. S Mayfield 

Ede, Francis H. S C Pen Argyl 

Eichhorn, Oscar J Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

Eppley, Mervin G Sc Carlisle 

Evans, Miriam G L. S Tyrone 

Filler, Donald B C Carlisle 

Fox, John H Ph Harrisburg 

Frescoln, Leonard H Sc Pottstown 



58 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Name Course Residence 

Goodhart, Fred E Sc Carlisle 

Goodyear, Jacob M L. S Carlisle 

Greenig, William F C Wenonah, N.J. 

Hartzell, Max Ph Stewartstown 

Hering, George C, Jr L. S Felton, Del. 

Hertzler, Lyman G Sc Carlisle 

Hoover, George V L. S Penbrook 

Hopkins, Joseph A L. S Harrisonville, N.J. 

Humer, Christian P C Carlisle 

Jones, Helen L. S Carlisle 

Leidigh, Margery F C Carlisle 

McCabe, Joshua B C Bishopville, Md. 

McCready, James C Ph Summit Hill 

McMillan, Margaret V L. S Carlisle 

Marks, Gordon M Ph Carlisle 

Mead, Douglass S Ph Greenwich, Conn. 

Mechanic, Max I L. S Viola, Del. 

Meek, Anna Elizabeth L. S Carlisle 

Meek, Roy S Ph East Altoona 

Meredith, Gladys W L. S Maplewood, N.J. 

Mohler, Nora M C Carlisle 

Mohler, Roy W Ph Mt. Holly Springs 

Myers, Robert L., Jr L. S Camp Hill 

Nicklas, Charles R Ph Chambersburg 

Price, Harry L L. S Minersville 

Priddis, Milton R L. S Carlisle 

Puderbaugh, J. Frank Ph Eldorado 

Quimby, John W Ph Phoenixville 

Rasmussen, Henry Ph Baltimore, Md. 

Reiff, Janet E L. S New Cumberland 

Respess, Homer M C Baltimore, Md. 

Reuwer, Joseph F Ph Paxtang 

Robinson, H. Delmer L. S Winchester, Va. 

Schellinger, Ethel M L. S Green Creek, N.J. 

Sharman, David, Jr L. S Frit ztown 

Shelley, Carl B Ph Steelton 

Shelley, Frank L Ph Steelton 

Shuey, Herman J L. S Harrisburg 

Shumpp, ( Vcili.-i M L. S ( Carlisle 

Stapleton, \Y. Maynard Ph Pottsville 

Si lit <•, A II ..it L. S Chambersburg 

Stuart, Christine H L. S Carlisle 

Wagner, Marie l> C Carlisle 

Warfield, Gaither P C Rockville, Md. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 59 

Name Course Residence 

Weinberg, David Ph Lonaconing, Md. 

White, J. Gilbert Ph Lewistown 

Woodward, Robert E C Fort Huachuca, Arizona 

Young, Edmund G L. S Tunkhannock 

SOPHOMORES 

Adams, Frank R L. S Rupert 

Adams, Raymond D L. S Keyport, N.J. 

Albertson, A. Byron Ph Morrill, Neb. 

Asper, John E Ph Mechanicsburg 

Barbour, J. Murray L. S Chambersburg 

Beam, Herbert P L. S Carlisle 

Bender, Irene J C Carlisle 

Berkheimer, Charles F L. S Mechanicsburg 

Bixler, Harold H C Carlisle 

Blair, Andrew C Carlisle 

Brady, Edward A. C Ph Minersville 

Brame, Luther F C Carlisle 

Breisch, Howard R L. S Hazleton 

Chilcoat, Alvin S L. S Rockhill Furnace 

Clark, M. Mabel L. S Harrisburg 

Claycomb, Roy S L. S Bedford, 

Crunkleton, Walter Ph Greencastle 

Davis, Michael F C Eatontown, N.J. 

Dorsey, F. Donald P Mt. Airy, Md. 

Evans, Marion G L. S Tyrone 

Evans, Sylvester M P Kinzer 

Faddis, Robert E Ph Parkesburg 

Filler, Mildred Clare C Carlisle 

Fisher, Iva M Ph Asbury Park, N.J. 

Flegal, Russell C Ph Clearfield 

Flood, Eugene T Ph Beaver Meadows 

Gardner, Anna Belle L. S Perryville, Md. 

Gaydos, Anna E P Johnstown 

Gerberich, Albert H., Jr L. S Parkesburg 

Glenwright, Mary E Ph Minersville 

Harris, M. Wilson C Centreville, Md. 

Hemmann, Carl E Ph Wethersfield, Conn. 

Hemminger, Ruth Ph Carlisle 

Hennen, James C Ph Altoona 

Holmes, C. Wendell L. S Cape May Court House, N.J. 

Holtzinger, W. Jackson Ph Tyrone 

Hutchison, Paul L L. S Carlisle 

Kell, Lillian M L. S Steelton 



60 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Name Course Residence 

Kenworthy, C. Hubert Ph Parkesburg 

Kerr, George C Ph Christiana 

Kohr, Russell R L. S New Cumberland 

Kramer, Mildred H Ph Harrisburg 

Leidigh, George W C Carlisle 

Lippi, Elva R L. S Harrisburg 

Long, William Ph Carlisle 

McNeal, James H., Jr C Easton, Md. 

Marvil, Nellie H Ph Laurel, Del. 

Masland, Frank E., Jr Ph Bustleton, Philadelphia 

May, M. Eleanor C Harrisburg 

May, M. Margaret C Harrisburg 

Mellott, Amos C L. S Coalport 

Minick, Mary E C Carlisle 

Mortimer, Earle L Ph Altoona 

Mower, Alfred G P Mechanicsburg 

Mumma, Edith R P Mechanicsburg 

Noll, Ruth M C Carlisle 

Nuttle, Harold C P Denton, Md. 

Palm, A. Maurice L. S Philipsburg 

Pearson, John M Ph Hurfville, N.J. 

Price, Harper A Ph Altoona 

Price, Mildred H L. S Carlisle 

Protzman, Merle L Ph Waynesboro 

Read, Clark D Ph Clearfield 

Ritts, M. Marie L. S Altoona 

Robinson, Herbert K Ph Mehoopany 

Roorbach, Agnew O Ph Cape May Court House, N.J. 

Sanford, Hazel L. S Tunkhannock 

Saul, Reuben C Ph Reading 

Shaff ner, L. Earl C Avis 

Shepherd, Horace F Ph Philadelphia 

Smith, Bessie E L. S Monocacy 

Spong, Ralph H L. S Millersburg 

Springer, Constance L L. S Carlisle 

Stufft, John W Ph BosweD 

Taylor, William I'., Jr L. S Georgeto^ q, Del. 

Trevaskis, John D P Turtle ( Jreek 

Walter, ( reorge II Ph ( rreencasl !<• 

Walters, .John F L. S Utoona 

Weidenha/er, J. David L. S Shamokin 

Welliver, Lester A c Hasleton 

Willits, Seymour R Ph Madison. N.J. 

Womer, Porter Blake L. S Huntingdon 



DICKINSON COLLEGE Gl 

FRESHMEN 

Name Course Residence 

Allen, Arthur W L. S Hazleton 

Artley, Franklin L C Catawissa 

Atkinson, John Hanlon P Jersey City, N.J. 

Bacon, Ada Elizabeth Ph Glencoe, Md. 

Bailey, Melvin D Sc Carlisle 

Balentine, David M Ph East Downingtown 

Barnhardt, Walter L Ph Llewellyn 

Beaver, Paul E L. S Altoona 

Bell, Anna Mary L. S Harrisburg 

Bellows, Donald Ph Glyndon, Md. 

Bowes, Kathryn U L. S Clearfield 

Brennan, John P. J L. S Larksville 

Brokaw, Harriet Evelyn. . . . .L. S Williamsport 

Bubb, Cornelius V C Glen Rock 

Burdan, Joseph Ph Pottstown 

Burke, George H C Freeland, Md. 

Burton, William F Ph Seaford, Del. 

Butler, Marguerite L. S Harrisburg 

Carmitchell, Beatrice E L. S Strong 

Carter, Harold St. Clair C Philadelphia 

Catlin, Edward Y Ph Port Allegany 

Caufman, Lillian Esther C Carlisle 

Coleman, M. Clare L. S Punxsutawney 

Collins, Ruth G L. S Newport 

Conover, C. Van Dyke, Jr Ph Penns Grove, N.J. 

Conover, Helen L. S Penns Grove, N.J. 

Cook, Helen May Ph Pottsville 

Cook, W. Miller Sc Bloomfield, N.J. 

Coyle, Mervin G Ph Carlisle 

Craine, A. Eleanore Ph Altoona 

Crim, Marion E Ph York 

Curran, John G Ph Minersville 

Davis, Charles E C Wilmington, Del. 

Day, Mildred Lee L. S Harrisburg 

Eppley, Edna E Ph Carlisle 

Ewing, Helen Ruth L. S Tyrone 

Fagan, Thomas Francis Ph Chester 

Forcey, Bernard Ph Beech Creek 

Fry, Gordon E L. S Camp Hill 

Galloway, Carl H Ph Parkesburg 

Garber, Mark E Ph Carlisle 

Garrett, John W., Jr L. S Waynesboro 

Gilbert, Samuel P L. S Sharon 



62 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Name Course Residence 

Ginter, Ethel Mae L. S Carlisle 

Glowa, Walter J L. S Shamokin 

Goodhart, Charles Floyd Ph Kerrsville 

Goodyear, M. Brandt Ph Carlisle 

Graham, Elizabeth L C Carlisle 

Greene, Albert Harland L. S Westminster, Md. 

Ham, S. Lewis Ph Westfield, N.J. 

Hamme, Herbert Gordon C Brodbecks 

Hanby, F. Evans Ph Chester 

Hand, Ralph C Ph Eldora, N.J. 

Harris, Samuel J C Harrisburg 

Hatton, Mary Caroline L. S Harrisburg 

Haws, Benjamin F Ph Pottstown 

Hertzler, Barbra E Ph Carlisle 

Hess, George W L. S Swain, N.J. 

Hilbush, Joseph F L. S Newville 

Hill, William Hoover Ph Nanticoke 

Hinterleiter, Harold L. S Carlisle 

Holton, Mariette W L. S Pedricktown, N.J. 

Hummel, Frederick W L. S Greenwich, Conn. 

Hurlbert, Mary Louise L. S Beach Haven 

Irelan, Hobart F Ph Linwood, N.J. 

Isaacman, Harry Ph Harrisburg 

Jacobs, Sumner C P Melrose Highlands, Ml 

Jefferson, William G L. S Steelton 

Jester, John Boone P Felton, Del. 

Johnson, George E C Catawissa 

Johnson, Lester F Ph Rehoboth, Del. 

Karns, Carl Edmund L. S Carlisle 

Karns, Charles Donald Ph Carlisle 

Kimmel, William G L. S Carlisle 

Kohr, John E L. S Middletown 

Krugcr, Ruth Anna Ph Carlisle 

Laird, Fleda B L. S ( Irisfield, Md. 

Learned, Mary Rebecca L. S Philadelphia 

Lepperd, Floyd C L. S Duncannon 

Line, Mary K L. S Carlisle 

Lingle, John C Ph Middletown 

Line, Richard W Ph Carlisle 

Lobach, ( iatherine E L. S Lancaster 

Long, Edwin li L. S Harrisburg 

Long, William T I>. 8 Bolivar 

Lutz, I IK- I >.-i\ id I'll Carlisle 

McElheny, Lucetta E L. S Steelton 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 63 

Name Course Residence 

Masland, Robert Paul Ph Bustleton, Philadelphia 

Matthews, William E. Jr L. S Felton, Del. 

Miller, Oscar H L. S New Freedom 

Miller, William A Ph Bellwood 

Mills, Thomas C Ph Ginter 

Minnich, Robert E Ph Wiconisco 

Morrett, Franklin Ph Steelton 

Morris, Michael P L. S Larksville 

Mowbray, Edwin R L. S Pikesville, Md. 

Moyer, George W Sc Lansdale 

Mumper, Robert A Ph Mechanicsburg 

Myers, Edna Marie Ph Newville 

Myers, J. Arthur Ph Duncannon 

Niesley, Ruth Louise C Carlisle 

Paterson, Alexander, Jr ". . Ph Clearfield 

Pearce, Rowan C P Philadelphia 

Pengelly, Bessie C Hazleton 

Pimm, Ira S L. S Camden, N.J. 

Popel, Esther A. B L. S Harrisburg 

Quimby, E. Mark Sc. . .' Phoenixville 

Rossing, J. Milton C Baltimore, Md. 

Ruch, Robert E P Carlisle 

Rupp, George Hoover L. S Shiremanstown 

Schellinger, Elizabeth N L. S Green Creek, N.J. 

Schellinger, Mary N L. S Green Creek, N.J. 

Schafhirt, Richard W L. S Mechanicsburg 

Sellers, Harry U L. S Tyrone 

Sharp, Reuben L L. S Mullica Hill, N.J. 

Shauck, Frank O L. S New Freedom 

Sherman, Lois C L. S Carlisle 

Shope, Charles E Ph Altoona 

Shuman, Frank S Ph Newport 

Simmons, Harry E L. S Conemaugh 

Spare, Ralph H Ph Pottstown 

Spotts, Margaret C L. S Blain 

Steck, Kenneth L Ph Carlisle 

Steen, J. Corbett P Millsboro, Del. 

Stein, James B., Jr Ph Sunbury 

Stewart, Blanche E L. S Hollidaysburg 

Stewart, Dorothy E C Harrisburg 

Stover, Mary Jane L. S Carlisle 

Strausbaugh, John A C Porters Sideling 

Swain, Emma H L. S Cape May City, N.J. 

Talley, Fayette N L. S Port Norris, N.J. 



64 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Name Course Residence 

Taylor, Logan B Ph Cape May City, N.J. 

Terhune, Arbutus L. S Bayonne, N.J. 

Thompson, Edgar S Ph Carlisle 

Teitrick, Harold R C Carlisle 

Trego, Elmer E P Carlisle 

Trimmer, John W Ph Mechanicsburg 

Troutman, Glenn A L. S Saxton 

Tustin, Edward B., Jr P Ocean Grove, N.J. 

Unger, Marlin S L. S Shamokin 

Van Scoyoc, Theodore F L. S Altoona 

Watts, Samuel L. S Belleville 

Weaver, Rosabelle L. S Mt. Carmel 

Wengert, Esther S Ph Harrisburg 

Widmeyer, Harold W L. S Hancock, Md. 

Wilhide, Charles Ross Ph Walkersville, Md. 

Willis, Clayton Ross Ph Harrisburg 

Zimmerman, August F L. S Halethrope, Md. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

Seniors 49 

Juniors 72 

Sophomores 82 

Freshmen 148 

351 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission 12 

Admission, Requirements 

for 13-15 

Alumni Associations 45, 46 

Alumni Fund Committee 46 

Alumni Statistics 4 

Astronomy 30 

Athletic Association 48 

Band, College 48 

Bible 21 

Bills, College 39 

Biology 21,22 

Botany 21 

Business Course 16 

Calendar, College 3 

Certificates, Admission 12 

Chemistry 22-24 

Courses of Study 15 

Degrees 38 

Degrees Conferred 10, 1 1 

Economics 34-37 

Education 31 

Engineering Course 17 

English 24,25 

Examinations 12 

Expenses 40, 41 

Faculty, College 7, 8 

French 33,34 

Geology 25 

German 25, 26 

Gowns, Hoods, and Caps 41, 42 

Greek 26, 27 

History 27,28 

Instruction 18 

Italian 34 

Latin 28,29 

Law 29 



PAGE 

Law Course 17 

Library 37, 38 

Library Guild 47 

Literary Societies 43, 44 

Material Equipment 37 

Mathematics 29, 30 

Medical Preparatory Course. .17, 18 

Metzger College 40 

Order of Studies — 

Freshman Class 19 

Sophomore Class 19, 20 

Junior Class 20 

Senior Class 20 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 46 

Philosophy 31 

Physical Training 31, 32 

Physics 32 

Prizes 49-52 

Psychology 31 

Public Speaking 32, 33 

Register of Students 56-64 

Scholarships 52-54 

Senate and Student Assem- 
bly 47 

Sociology 34-37 

Spanish 34 

Special Courses 16-18 

Teachers' Course 18 

Trustees, Board of 5, 6 

Visitors, Official 9 

Worship 39 

Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation 44 

Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation 44 

Zoology 22 






'.zarsnrs 



ii 



Bttfetiwon College 
bulletin 



Vol. XI 



MAY, 1917 



No. 2 



THE CATALOGUE 



1916-17 




CARLISLE, PA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

FEBRUARY — MAY — JULY 
NOVEMBER 



Entered as second-class matter, January 19, 1906, at tbo post-office at Carfide, Pa. 
under Act of Congress, of July 16, 1894. 



®= 



CATALOGUE OF 



Bufetnson College 



1916-1917 



134th ANNUAL SESSION 




CARLISLE, PA. 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MDCCCCXVII 



1916 


1917 


1918 


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JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 




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COLLEGE CALENDAR— 1916-1917 

FALL TERM — 1916 

September 21, Thursday, 2.30 p.m Fall Term begins. 

September 22, Friday Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

November 30 -December 3 Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 22, Friday, 10.30 a.m Fall Term ends. 

WINTER TERM — 1917 

January 2, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Winter Term begins. 

January 21-Feb. 2 Week of Prayer in College. 

March 2, Friday Intercollegiate Debates. 

March 16, Friday, 10.30 a.m Winter Term ends. 

SPRING TERM — 1917 

March 27, Tuesday, 8.30 a.m Spring Term begins. 

May 21-24 Final examinations, Seniors. 

May 26-31 Final examinations, other classes. 

June 1, Friday, 8 p.m Oratorical Contest. 

June 2, Saturday 10 a.m Phi Beta Kappa Meeting. 

11.00 a.m Class Reunions. 

1.30-4.30 p.m Class Day Exercises. 

4.00-6.00 p.m President's Reception. 

5.00-8.00 p.m Fraternity Banquets. 

7.00 p.m Annual Meeting of the Trustees of 

the College. 
8.15 p.m Concert by the Musical Organiza- 
tions of the College. 

June 3, Sunday, 11 a.m Baccalaureate Sermon, Bishop 

Joseph F. Berry. 

6.30 p.m Campus Service. 

7.30 Address before the College^ Chris- 
tian Associations, Prof. Lynn 
Harold Hough. 

June 4, Monday, 8.15 a.m Class Advancements. 

9.30 a.m Commencement Exercises of the 

College and School of Law. 
12.30 p.m Commencement Luncheon. 

1917-1918 
September 20, Thursday, 2.30 p.m. . .College Opening. 



ALUMNI STATISTICS 

Graduate Alumni, 2,824; non-graduate Alumni, 2,587; total 5,411 

Legal profession 1,040 

Ministry 900 

Physicians and dentists 408 

Editors and journalists 80 

Financial and mercantile pursuits 520 

Agricultural pursuits 170 

President of the United States 1 

Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1 

Judges of Federal Courts 7 

United States Cabinet Officers 9 

Ministers to Foreign Governments 8 

United States Consuls 12 

United States Senators 10 

Members of Congress , 53 

Officers of the Army 238 

Officers of the Navy 26 

Governors of States 7 

Lieutenant-Governors of States 3 

Attorney-Generals of States 8 

Secretaries of Commonwealths 8 

Chancellors of States 3 

Chief Justices of State Supreme Courts 6 

Associate Justices of State Supreme Courts 15 

Judges of lower courts 66 

State Senators 39 

Members of State Assemblies 132 

Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church 4 

Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 3 

Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church 1 

Presidents of colleges 42 

I leads of professional schools 10 

Professors in colleges L35 

Superintendents of Bchools 66 

Principals of academies, seminaries, and high schools 260 

Inst rUCtorS ill lower-grade schools 610 

["his record, it should be observed.! does not full] express the useful work 

doni i>\ the College, as in the earlier days of the institution the record* ware bul indiffer- 
ently pretervedi and i " m Iss1 revised more than ii\ ■■ yt u 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle President 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq Vice-President 

Rev. Charles W. Straw, D.D Secretary 

John S. Bursk Treasurer 

TERM EXPIRES 1918 

J. Henry Baker, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. Bishop Joseph F. Berry, LL.D Philadelphia 

Edward M. Biddle, Esq Carlisle 

Abram Bosler Carlisle 

Gen. Horatio C. King, LL.D.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Alexander Simpson, Jr., LL.D Philadelphia 

Boyd Lee Spahr, Esq Philadelohia 

C. Price Speer Chambersburg 

Rev. William A. Stephens, D.D Carlisle 

Rev. Charles W. Straw, D.D Philadelphia 

Hon. George R. Willis, LL.D Baltimore, Md. 

TERM EXPIRES 1919 

G. Harold Baker ' Aberdeen, Md. 

George D. Chenoweth, Sc.D Woodbury, N.J. 

Joseph E. Holland Milford, Del . 

Lloyd Wellington Johnson Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Rev. Bishop William F. McDowell, LL.D Washington, D.C 

Rev. Cornelius W. Prettyman, D.D. . Carlisle 

Rev. Herbert F. Randoplh, D.D Wilmington, Del. 

Rev. Luther T. Widerman, D.D Baltimore 

TERM EXPIRES 1920 

Paul P. Appenzellar New York City 

Rev. Charles Wesley Burns, D.D Minneapolis, Minn. 

Melville Gambrill Wilmington, Del. 

Rev. Frank B. Lynch, D.D Philadelphia 

Gen. James F. Rusling, LL.D Trenton, N.J. 

Wilmer W. Salmon Rochester, N.Y. 

Rev. Robert Watt, D.D Wilmington, Del. 

William L. Woodcock, Esq., Ph.D Altoona 



6 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

TERM EXPIRES 1921 

Hon. Edward W. Biddle Carlisle 

Frank C. Bosler, Esq Carlisle 

Henry P. Cannon Bridgeville, Del. 

Rev. William P. Davis, D.D Camden, N.J. 

Robert W. Irving, Esq Carlisle 

Robert E. MacAlarney New York City 

Robert F. Rich Woolrich 

Ruby R. Vale, D.C.L Philadelphia 

Rev. Bishop Luther B. Wilson, LL.D New York City 

Charles K. Zug, Esq Philadelphia, Pa. 



standing committees 

Executive Committee: 

J. Henry Baker, Edward M. Biddle, Jr., Frank C. Bosler, George 
D. Chenoweth, Robert W. Irving, James H. Morgan, Charles W. Straw, 
Robert Watt; 

Edward W. Biddle, Chairman. 

Library Committee: 

Wilmer W. Salmon, C. Price Speer; 

James H. Morgan, Chairman. 

Committee on Trustees: 

James H. Morgan, Boyd Lee Spahr, William A. Stephens, Luther 
T. Widerman; 

Horatio C. King, Chairman. 

Committee on Grounds and Buildings: 
Frank C. Bosler, Robert W. Irving; 

James H. Morgan, Chairman. 

Efficiency Committee: 

Paul P. Appenzellar, Joseph F. Berry, Charles W. Burns, William 
P. Davis, I' 1 rank B. Lynch, Lloyd W. Johnson, Alexander Simpson, Jr., 
Luther B. Wilson; 

Charles K. Zug, Chairman. 

Committee on Conwat Hall: 

Edward \\ . Biddle, Abram Bosler, Thomas E, Martindale, Wil- 
liam L. \\ oodcock ; 

.lames 11. Morgan, Chairman. 

( lOMMITTBE <>n A i imt: 

Melville Gambrill, C. \\ Prettyman. 



FACULTY 

JAMES HENRY MORGAN, Ph.D., LL.D. 

President 

BRADFORD OLIVER McINTIRE, Ph.D. 

Thomas Beaver Professor of English and American Literature 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS, Sc.D. 
Susan Powers Hoffman Professor of Mathematics 

JOHN FREDERICK MOHLER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 

♦WILLIAM LAMBERT GOODING, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Education 

HENRY MATTHEW STEPHENS, Sc.D. 

Professor of Biology 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER, Litt.D. 

Dean, and Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

CORNELIUS WILLIAM PRETTYMAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of German Language and Literature 

MONTGOMERY PORTER SELLERS, A.M. 

Professor of Rhetoric and the English Language 

LEON CUSHING PRINCE, Litt.D. 

Professor of History 

GUY HOWARD SHADINGER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

FORREST EUGENE GRAVER, A.M. 

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, and Physical Director 

GEORGE FRANKLIN COLE, A.M. 

Professor of Romance Languages 

RUTER WILLIAM SPRINGER, A.M., LL.M. 

Associate Professor of English Bible and Greek Testament 

GAYLARD HAWKINS PATTERSON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 
* Deceased. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 

HERBERT WING, Jr., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Greek Language and Literature 

WILLIAM ALLEN ROBINSON, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English 

WILBUR H. NORCROSS, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Education 

G. LAFAYETTE CRAM, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

MELVIN HOWARD KELLY, A.B. 

Instructor in Classics 



SARAH HELEN BURNS, A.M. 

Librarian 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

MERVIN GRANT FILLER 

Dean of the College 

WILLIAM WEIDMAN LANDIS 

Secretary of the Faculty 

MISS SARAH K. EGE 

Lady in Charge of Metzger College 

MISS SARA M. BLACK 

Secretary to the President 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Absences 
Professor Sellers 

Athletics 
Professors Stephens, Craver, and Prettyman 

Government and Discipline 

PKOFES80RS FlLLER, MOHLER, PltETTYMAN, ShADINQBR, AND SELLERS 

Graduate Work 
Pbofessors McIntirb, Prince, and Cole 

Library 
Professors McIntirb, Sellers, \m> Kelli 



OFFICIAL VISITORS 

June, 1916 

BALTIMORE 

Rev. Charles D. Taylor Rev. Benjamin W. Meeks 

Rev. John R. Edwards Rev. John O. Spencer 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. Edgar R. Heckman Harry M. Sho Walter 

Rev. Harry E. Crow John McCurdy 

Rev. Robert C. Peters D. L. Hoffman 

NEW JERSEY 
Rev. Herbert J. Root Rev. John W. Lynch 

NEWARK 
Rev. Abel C. McCrea Rev. John W. Flynn 

NEW YORK EAST 
Rev. W. W. W. Wilson Rev. Saul O. Curtice 

PHILADELPHIA 

Rev. Francis A. Manlove Rev. William H. Ford 

Rev. James Cunningham Rev. Wayne Channell 

Rev. John W. Perkinpine 

WILMINGTON 

Rev. Stephen M. Morgan Rev. Herbert F. Randolph 
Rev. V. P. Northrup 

WYOMING 

Rev. Wesley I. Andrews Rev. R. Floyd Lesh 

Rev. Berthier W. Dix 



DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE 

1916 

I Honoris Causa 

LL.D. — DOCTOR OF LAWS 

James R. Joy, Litt.D., New York City 

D.D. — DOCTOR OF DIVINITY 
Rev. Frederick J. Hubach, Plainfield, N.J. 
Rev. L. Clarence Hunt, Myerstown 
Rev. Emory M. Stevens, Huntingdon 
Rev. Robert W. H. Weech, Baltimore, Md. 

A.M. — MASTER OF ARTS 
H. J. Barrett, Hollidaysburg 



II In Cursu 

A.M. — MASTER OF ARTS 



Claster, Joel 

Dickinson, '14 
Coyle, Mary Emily 

Dickinson, '14 
Daniels, Harry 

Dickinson, '13 
Goudie, Aubrey Blaine 

Dickinson, '13 
Grimes, Byron J. 

Dickinson, '04 
Gboome, J. Cooper 

Dickinson, '13 
boltzman, herbert p. 

Dickinson, '13 

.1 \Mi;so.N, J. Paul 

Dickinson, '07 
KbLLBB, \ii\i\\ Foobbman 

( rETTTBBURO < lOLLEQB 

Lai bbti . Lawson 8. 
Dickinson. '15 



Leopold, J. Bashore 

University of Pennsylvania 
Miller, Adam Franklin 

Muhlenberg College 
Morgan, Julia 

Dickinson, '11 
Mountjoy, Harry 

Dickinson, '15 
Pannell, J. Dress 

Gettysburg College 
Paterson, Robert Bruce 

Dickinson, '13 
Hkikk, Roberta 

Dickinson, '15 
ROBINSON, William II. 

Dickinson, '1 I 

KoCKM \KIU. I I J M \N 

Dickinson. '13 

Rub, Edg ib H. 
Dickinson, i"> 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



11 



Shelley, John L., Jr. 

Gettysburg College 
Small, Jesse Ohrum 

Dickinson, '15 
Sperow, Wilson P. 

Dickinson, '14 
Van Siclen, Clinton DeWitt 

Dickinson, '14 



Wilson, Francis G. 

Dickinson, '14 
Wilson, Stanley G. 

Dickinson, '15 
Woodward, Franklin Tuthill 

Dickinson, '01 



A.B. — BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Allison, Albert H. 
Baker, Eli as B. 
Bradley, George W. 
Brewer, Raymond Rush 
Bucher, Mabel Viola 
Craig, Margaret A. 
Curran, Thomas V. 
Ganoe , Robert Luther 
Garner, Gilbert Dickson 
Graham, Daniel Niel Frick 
Harman, Charles Henry 
Hart, F. Leslie 
Hodgson, Robert Spencer 
Jeffery, Thomas R. 
Kern, Russel Bernard 
Lamborn, Louis Emmor 
Lauman, Helen D. 
Lepperd, Julius Wayne 
Lippincott, Samuel Thomas 
Lutz, Sylvia Pearl 
MacGregor, Thomas Wilson 



McMahon, Mary J. 
Massey, Reynolds C. 
Meloy, Olga M. 
Michael, Raymond Stewart 
Mohler, Anna M. 
Moose, George C. 
Needy, A. Norman 
Nieman, Benjamin 
Prather, Perry Franklin 
Reisler, Herbert Steel 
Reitz, Charles Herbert 
Rupert, Beatrice Enyeart 
Rupp, David Mohler 
Shelley, D. Hummel 
Shope, Edward Pierce Lentz 
Shuey, Anna M. 
Smith, C. Hammond 
Stephens, William Ganoe 
Taylor, Lloyd Eilenberger 
Van Auken, Clark Lewis 
Wiener, Amelia K. 



PH.B. — BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Dysart, Russell Baldwin McWhinney, Robert Russell 

SC.B. — BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
MacGregor, Clarence Donald Rogers, David Paul 

LL.B. — BACHELOR OF LAWS 

Chase, J. Mitchell Garrahan, Daniel Matthews 

Claster, Joel Hibbard, John J. 

Coll, Joseph Francis Holtzman, Herbert P. 

Coplan, Harry Keller, Niemond Fooreman 

Courtney, James Henry Leopold, J. Bashore 



12 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Maeshall, Kendall C. 
Massinger, James Chester 
McCament, George G. 
McKone, John Cessna 
Miller, A. F. 
Pannell, John Dress 
Plessett, David 
Prince, Joseph Leonard 



rockmaker, hyman 
Rosenberg, Wolfe 
Scribner, Alex. St. John 
Shelley, John Lawrence, Jr. 
Shenton, Clarence George 
Staudenmeier, Charles W. 
Wise, William Barton 
Yates, James Russell 



ADMISSION 

Students are admitted by certificate and on examination. In 
all cases they must present testimonials of good moral character, 
and, if from other colleges, evidences of honorable dismissal. 

Applications for admission to advanced standing in the college 
will not be received later than the opening of the Senior year. 

Women are admitted to all the privileges of the college. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for work done in approved secondary schools are 
accepted, and students are admitted to the college on certifica- 
tion that the requirements for admission have been fully met; 
but certificates covering less than the full requirements may or 
may not be accepted, according to the amount of the short- 
age and the conditions under which the work was done. How- 
ever, students in arrears in preparation one full year's work in 
English, or more than one year's work in any other study, 
will be examined on all the work offered in the subject or 
subjects in which there is this deficiency. 

Diplomas or certificates of graduation will not be accepted, 
but blank forms of certificates will be furnished on application, 
and it is required that these certificates be sent to the college 
by the principal of the school. 

Certificates for advanced standing in the college may or 
may not be accepted, according to the institution in which 
the advanced work has been done, and the branches of college 
work for which the certificate is offered. In other words, 
candidates for such advanced standing must demonstrate their 
preparation for the work of the advanced classes for which 
they apply. 

ON EXAMINATION 

Examinations for admission are held commencement week, 
and on the day before the opening of the fall term. 

For advanced standing students must show that they have 
covered in a satisfactory manner both the preparatory work 



14 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

for entrance to college and the studies previously pursued by 
the classes they propose to enter. 

ENTRANCE UNITS 

Requirements for admission are stated in terms of units, 
a unit being a course of study pursued for a year at least four 
periods of forty minutes each per week. At least fourteen and 
one-half such units are required for admission, and graduates 
from literary courses of approved high schools or academies 
can meet the requirements. 

Units Required in All Courses x 

English 3 

History 2 

Mathematics: Algebra and Plane Geometry. . . 2J 

Additional Requirements for Courses 

Classical — 4 Latin and 3 Greek. 

Latin-Scientific — 4 Latin and 3 French or German. 2 

Philosophical — 

1. Requirements for Classical or Latin-Scientific Course. 

2. Eight units from the following: French, German, Latin, 

Science, History, and Mathematics, in addition to 
requirements for all courses. 
Seven units will satisfy this requirement if five of the 
seven are in two subjects and three of the seven are 
in Language other than English. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION BY SUBJECTS 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose 
work is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, idiom, or 
division into paragraphs. 

Reading and Practice. In the reading and study of English 
classics, the requirements are those recommended by the 
National Conference <>n College Entrance Requirements in 

i mora detailed Information ooneeraing th< i 26, 87. 80, 82. 

iiiui. uiii be accepted f oi Preach or German, but one oftbem trill be required 
dm Ing the ooHege course. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 15 

English. The work is usually covered by approved high schools 
of four-year courses of study. 

French. — The preparation in French should comprise 
careful drill in the rudiments of grammar, including the in- 
flection of the regular and the common irregular verbs, the 
inflection of adjectives, and the use of the participles and pro- 
nouns, constant attention being paid to pronunciation. Much 
time should be given to translations, both oral and written, 
of easy English into French. From six hundred to eight hun- 
dred pages of graduated texts should be read. If much atten- 
tion has been given to oral work, the amount of reading may 
be diminished. 

German. — Students offering German as an entrance re- 
quirement should be thoroughly familiar with the essentials 
of German Grammar; should be able to translate easy English 
into German; should be able to translate at sight easy German 
prose, and should be able to pronounce with a fair degree of 
accuracy. Candidates offering two years of German for admis- 
sion to college are expected to have read 200 pages of easy 
German; those offering three years are expected to have read 
400 pages besides reading at sight in class. From students who 
have been taught according to the Direct Method, a smaller 
amount of reading will be accepted. 

Greek. — Grammar; Xenophon's " Anabasis/' four books; 
Homer's "Iliad," three books. Fair equivalents will be accepted. 

Prose composition, based on the Greek texts read from day 
to day in preparation, is recommended, and ability to write 
simple Greek sentences is required. 

History. — Histories of Greece, Rome, and the United States. 
The following works will indicate the amount required : Wester- 
mann's " Story of the Ancient Nations "; Botsford's " Ancient 
World"; or Botsford's "Orient and Greece" with Abbott's 
" Shoit History of Rome "; any good history of the United 
States, such as Channing's, McLaughlin's, MacMaster's, or 
Hart's. 

Latin. — I. The Latin reading required of candidates for 
admission to college, without regard to the prescription of par- 
ticular authors and works, shall be not less in amount than 



16 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Caesar, " Gallic War," I-IV; Cicero, "The Orations against 
Catiline," "For the Manilian Law," and "For Archias"; 
Vergil, "JEneid," I-VL 

II. The amount of reading specified above shall be selected 
by the schools from the following authors and works: Caesar, 
"Gallic War" and "Civil War"; Nepos, "Lives"; Cicero, 
"Orations" and "De Senectute"; Sallust, "Catiline" and "Ju- 
gurthine War"; Vergil, "Bucolics," "Georgics," and "^Eneid"; 
and Ovid, "Metamorphoses," "Fasti," and "Tristia." 

The Latin requirements as stated above are those recom- 
mended by the American Philological Association in 1909. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; 
Algebra through Geometric Progression; Plane Geometry, 
including the solution of one hundred or more original exer- 
cises. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The college offers three parallel courses of study, each cover- 
ing four years: the Classical, the Latin-Scientific, and the 
Philosophical courses. The studies of the first two years are 
largely required; but in the last two years the work is mostly 
elective, as shown under Curriculum, pages 20-21. 

Classical Course. — Latin and Greek, four hours each per 
week, are required in the Freshman year, and are elective, 
three hours each per week, for the rest of the course. 

Latin-Scientific Course. — Latin is the same as for the Clas- 
sical course, but the Greek of that course is replaced by addi- 
tional studies in modern languages and science. 

Philosophical Course. — This course is akin to the Scientific 
course, but less science work is required. 

Scientific Course. — Although the college offers no scientific 
course, it allows the election of much science on the part of 
students, enough to cover half of the entire college course. 

Rules Governing Electives. — Elections must be made in 
May and musl have the approval of class deans. Change in 
electives may be made for good reason with the consent of class 
deans during the first three days of the college year, but Later 
changes can be made only with faculty approval. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 17 

Extra Elective Studies. — Elective studies may be taken as 
additional work by regular students, if, in the judgment of 
the faculty, such additional work will not interfere with their 
regular work. No student, however, with a general average 
of less than seventy-five per cent in any year, can take more 
than one extra hour of Junior or Senior work the following year. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

In addition to these four regular courses of study leading to 
graduation and an academic degree, the college provides a 
Partial Course for students not planning for so long a college 
residence as would be required to complete the full course. It 
also makes provision by electives for much special prepara- 
tion along the line of the intended life work of students, espe- 
cially for those purposing to engage in business or to become 
lawyers, physicians, or teachers. 

Partial Course. — Students with uneven preparation may 
be admitted to the college for a Partial Course upon showing 
by examination or otherwise that they are prepared for col- 
lege work. No such student, however, will be admitted unless 
fully prepared in English, History, and one other subject of 
college preparation, nor with less than eleven units of college 
preparatory work. 

Business Course. — The college recognizes the fact that an 
ever-increasing number of college-bred men are entering upon 
business careers, and to meet their needs it offers electives in 
preparation for their business careers, practical courses of 
cultural value. 

Modern languages are a valuable part of such a course in 
this day of close relations in all the business world, and in addi- 
tion to the ordinary French and German of the college course, 
Italian and Spanish have been added. Spanish especially is 
likely to be of increasing value as this country draws nearer 
in its business life to the great and rapidly developing countries 
of South America. 

At least one course in Economics is required of all candidates 
for a degree, and other similar courses are elective in Modern 



18 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

Industrial Development, Industrial Organization and Business 
Management, Principles of Sociology, Social and Economic 
Problems, and others. 

These electives as part of a cultural course are commended 
to the prospective business man. 

Engineering Course. — While many engineering schools admit 
students directly from the high school, some of them feel 
that it is a mistake both for the schools and for the students. 
Under this system engineers promise to be the least liberally 
educated of our professions. Law, medicine, and the ministry 
almost require part of the college course as preparation for their 
own professional studies. Engineers alone are educated largely 
without any college preparation, and there is beginning to be 
a protest against this on the part of the public and the wiser 
part of our body of youth. At Dickinson a considerable 
number of young people are taking the college course and pro- 
posing after that to take their professional course in engineering, 
giving to the subject one or two years as may be necessary, 
and having the liberal training as a basis for their professional 
work. If a young man is planning for a broad, cultural prepa- 
ration for life as well as for professional success, he ought 
certainly to take the liberal arts training and then his profes- 
sional specialty. The course in Dickinson College is arranged 
so as to prepare thoroughly for a prompt adjustment with pro- 
fessional engineering work for those choosing to take it after 
graduation. 

Law Course. — In preparation for law, as part of the college 
course three hours per week of law may be elected in the Junior 
year and five hours per week in the Senior year. By judicious 
election and a little extra work good students may thus save 
one year in their subsequent course in the School of Law, com- 
pleting the law course in two years after graduation instead of 
the three which would otherwise be required. An extra charge, 
however, is made when law is thus elected in place of college 

work. 

Medical Preparatory Course. -All good medical schools 
to-day require a good deal of preparation beyond thai of the 

high school, ranging from (he college degree to two yc:ir> of 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 19 

college work; and most good medical schools also require that 
certain particular subjects shall be taken as preparation for 
their work. Students who propose to study medicine may 
shape their college course in such a way as to meet fully the 
requirements of any of the great medical schools. The com- 
pletion of the college course is strongly recommended for those 
who expect to study medicine, but for those who plan for less 
than this arrangements can be made whereby the requirement 
of some medical schools may be met in a shorter time. 

Teachers' Course. — The growing high school demand for 
college-trained teachers has found expression in the school codes 
of most of the progressive states, and on the completion of a 
college course covering certain electives in History and Prin- 
ciples of Education, and Psychology, young men and women 
are given certificates to teach in these states. The college thus 
prepares a great many teachers, and they are at once certified 
by state authorities and authorized to teach in their high schools. 
No ambitious young man or woman ought to consent to enter 
upon the teacher's career as a life work without the college 
degree. With this degree a grade of work is at once open to 
the teacher which would otherwise be closed probably for his 
or her entire career. The educational requirements of Penn- 
sylvania and neighboring states may be fully met by proper 
choice of electives in the college. 



INSTRUCTION 

It is the fixed policy of the college to be a teaching institution, 
and its first aim is to furnish wise and expert teaching leader- 
ship of the young people of the student body. To attain this 
end the college has steadily exalted the teacher, and its policy 
has been to have only mature men and experienced teachers in 
its corps of instruction, with no immature or inexperienced 
tutors. The college's teachers, therefore, must all have teach- 
ing experience elsewhere before they begin to do its work. 

For the arrangement of the college work in the various regular 
courses of study see Curriculum pages 20-21 and for further de- 
scription of the work given in individual subjects seepages 22-39. 



CURRICULUM 

The candidate for the degree of A.B. is required to complete 
67 year-hours of work, Freshman 18, Sophomore 17, Junior 
16, Senior 16, (in addition to required essays, orations, and 
physical exercise). 

Required Courses 

(For detailed explanation of these courses see pages 21-39.) 

Rhetoric and Public Speaking A; English Literature B . . . 6 hours 

History A and B 4 hours 

Mathematics A 4 hours 

Social Science A 3 hours 

Foreign Language — three or more courses, according to 

the work offered for admission 10 hours or more 

Science — two of the group Biology C, Chemistry C, and 

Physics C 8 hours 

Of these required courses English A, History A, Mathematics 
A, and two language courses comprise the work of the Fresh- 
man year; the remaining required courses except the second 
course in science should be completed in the Sophomore year. 

Elective Courses 

In addition to the above required courses the candidate 
elects in the following fields such an amount of work as will 
complete the requirement of 67 year-hours. 

(For detailed statement of courses in each department see pages 21-39.) 

Art, History of 2 hours 

Astronomy 2 hours 

Bible 2-4 hours 

Biology 4-8 hours 

Botany I 5 hours 

Chemistry i 15 hours 

I tebal iti^ 1 i hours 

Education 2 7 hours 

English Language •> hours 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 21 

English Literature 2- 8 hours in addition to required work 

French 3-12 hours 

Genetics 1 hour 

Geology 2 hours 

German 4-13 hours 

Greek, Classical 4-13 hours 

Greek Testament 2- 4 hours 

History 2-9? hours in addition to required work 

International Law 2 hours 

Italian 3 hours 

Latin , . . . . 4-13 hours 

Law 3- 8 hours 

Mathematics 3-11 hours in addition to required work 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Physics 4-12 hours 

Psychology • 3 hours 

Social Science (Economics, Soci- 
ology, Political Science) 2-14 hours in addition to required work 

Spanish 3- 6 hours 

Zoology 2- 3 hours 

Grade Required 

No student will be graduated who has not attained a grade 
above D on at least half his hours of work, unless the entire 
course averages C or above, or two-thirds of the Junior and 
Senior work averages C or above. 

In grading work the following system is used : 

A indicates 90 % or above. 

B indicates 80 % to 90 %. 

C indicates 70 % to 80 %. 

D indicates 60 % to 70 %. 

E indicates failure with privilege of re-examination. 

F indicates failure with requirement that work be repeated in class. 

ART, HISTORY OF 
Professor Landis 

The development of architecture, of sculpture, and of paint- 
ing is studied, the greater part of the course being devoted 
to the history of painting from the time of Giotto to the pres- 
ent. An effort is made to familiarize each student with repro- 
ductions of important works of art. Two hours for the year. 



22 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

ASTRONOMY 

(See Mathematics) 

BIBLE 
Associate Professor Springer 

This is a course in the philosophy of history based upon the 
Scriptural narrative. It aims to determine the underlying 
facts upon which the Scriptural narrative is based; and, in 
and through these facts, to form a correct view of the evo- 
lution of religious thought and of its relation to present-day 
religious and ethical ideals. To this end, the Bible itself is 
used as the text-book, original study therein being developed 
by quizzes, written summaries and analyses, short essays, and 
debates; and these studies are directed and supplemented 
by frequent lectures upon the Scriptural narrative, the text, 
contemporary history, and ethical and scientific side-lights, 
all aiming to bring the facts vividly to mind. The books 
are rearranged according to the order of the events narrated, 
and special attention is given, as these subjects are reached, 
to character-studies, literary form, textual accuracy, inspira- 
tion, the successive canons of Scripture, and kindred topics. 
The method is inductive, the standpoint is modern, non-sec- 
tarian, constructive, orthodox, and the aim is rather to stimu- 
late individual thought and investigation along safe lines 
than to reach predetermined or dogmatic conclusions. A two 
years' course, two hours per week; Old Testament in the 
junior year, and New Testament in the senior year. The 
courses are practically indivisible, and for those electing only 
one year's work a special course of outside* reading will be 
necessary. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Stephens 

A. Botany. Lecture Course. Lectures and recitations in 
Plant Morphology. Two hours, first semester. 

Lectures and recitations in Plant Physiology. Two hours, 
second eem&eU r. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 23 

B. Botany. Laboratory Course. Two 2-hour periods per 
week throughout the year in Plant Morphology and Plant 
Physiology, including also a limited amount of field work in 
Plant Ecology. 

C. Botany. Courses A and B combined. Four hours for 
the year. 

D. Botany. Class-room and field work in systematic 
botany, aiming to acquaint the student with the local flora. 
Two hours, second semester. 

E. Zoology. Lecture Course. Lectures and recitations in 
Animal Morphology and Physiology. One hour for the year. 

F. Zoology. Laboratory Course. One 2-hour period per 
week in Animal Morphology throughout the year. 

G. Zoology. Courses D and E combined. Two hours for the 
year. 

H. Zoology. Genetics. Lectures and recitations. (Pre- 
requisite, Zoology or Botany C.) Two hours, second semester. 

BOTANY 

(See Biology) 

CHEMISTRY 
Professor Shadinger 

The chemical laboratories and lecture-room occupy the east 
wing of the Jacob Tome Scientific Building. The main labora- 
tory contains desks for ninety-two students. The smaller labora- 
tory for advanced work accommodates twenty-four. Each 
student is furnished with a desk and apparatus necessary for 
the performance of the experiments under the supervision and 
instruction of the professor. 

A. Lecture Course. An elective course in General Inorganic 
chemistry. The aim of this course is to cover the fundamental 
theoretical principles of the science in connection with the 
descriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements. The ma- 
terial presented in the text is supplemented by lecture experi- 
ments and explanations. Students are given practice in 



24 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

stoichiometrical and other types of chemical problems. Three 
hours for the year. 

B. Laboratory Course. The laboratory work of the first 
year consists of the performance by each student of a series 
of experiments illustrating the important general principles 
and facts of the science, the properties of the more important 
non-metallic elements, and the laws of chemical action. The 
details of manipulation of these experiments are given, but 
with a view to cultivating the powers of observation. The 
student is required to observe carefully and describe clearly 
the results of each experiment. Two hours (counting as one) 
for the year. 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Lecture Course. An elective course devoted to the 
principles of theoretical and physical chemistry, such as the 
kinetic-molecular hypothesis, theory of solution, atomic hy- 
pothesis, chemical equilibrium, theory of dissociation in solution, 
electrolysis, and the laws of mass action. This is followed 
by a study of the metallic elements based upon the periodic 
system. Prerequisite: course A. Four hours, first semester. 

E. Laboratory Course. Qualitative Analysis, to accompany 
course D. The usual course of preliminary work and analysis 
of simple and complex substances is pursued. The ionic theory 
and laws of mass action are applied to this work. Eight hours 
(counting as four), second semester. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. Lecture Course. Organic Chemistry. An elective course 
devoted to the principal classes of organic compounds, ali- 
phatic and aromatic, with emphasis upon class reaction and 
the structural theory. Prerequisite: courses A and B, and 
preferably D and E. Two hours for the year. 

H. Laboratory Course. . A course in Organic Preparations 
to accompany Lecture eourse G. Laboratory work in t ho 
preparation and purification of compounds selected Prom the 
aliphatic and aromatic series for the illustration of important 
synthetic reactions; verification of fche constants of these 
compounds; methods of organic analysis. Four hours (count' 
ing us lint) for ike year. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 25 

I. Courses G and H combined. 

J, K, and L. Laboratory Courses. Courses in Quantitative 
Analysis in its several branches. The work comprises a series 
of experiments which illustrate the fundamental principles of 
gravimetric and volumetric methods. The courses are flexible, 
and great latitude will be allowed students manifesting interest 
and ability. Prerequisite: courses C and F. 

J. Four hours to count as two. 

K. Eight hours to count as four. 

L. Twelve hours to count as six. 

DEBATING 

The course in debating is planned to give those interested 
an opportunity to study the technique of oral argumentation 
and to practice the art of debate under supervision. The 
work will supplement rather than replace the debating in the 
College Literary Societies. Open to all students in the college. 
This course may be elected in two successive years for credit. 
In this case additional work will be required of advanced 
students. Three hours, first semester. 

ECONOMICS 

(See Social Science.) 

EDUCATION AND PHILOSOPHY 
Associate Professor Norcross 

F. History of Education. The course is based on Monroe's 
" History of Education" with special lectures on important 
periods. Students are encouraged to do supplementary 
reading and special reports on assigned topics are required. 
Two hours for the year. 

G. Principles of Secondary Education. The first semester 
is devoted to the work of the elementary schools, and the second 
semester to the work of the high school. Two hours for the 
year. 



26 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

D. Ethics. Text-book study with special papers prepared by 
the students at stated periods. Three hours, second semester. 

E. Philosophy. The work in Philosophy is based on Paul- 
sen's " Introduction to Philosophy" and is supplemented by 
lectures and assigned readings. Three hours, first semester. 

B. Psychology. A careful study of the physiology of the 
nervous system introduces the course in Psychology. Detailed 
study of the fundamental phenomena of mental experience 
follows with special emphasis on the findings of experimental 
psychology, human and animal. A limited amount of labo- 
ratory work is given. Text-book study with supplementary 
reading in the most important current publications. Three 
hours for the year. 

The courses in Education and Psychology aim to meet the 
requirements for certification of teachers in Pennsylvania 
and neighboring states. 

ENGLISH 

Professors Mclntire and Sellers and 

Associate Professor Robinson 

A. Rhetoric and Composition, based upon English Composi- 
tion in Theory and Practice, by Canby and others. Required 
of all Freshmen. Professor Sellers and Associate Professor 
Robinson. Four hours for the year. 

B. An introduction to the history of English literature 
with illustrative readings in class and in private reading courses. 
The text-book is supplemented by lectures and comments. 
Pancoast's " Introduction to English Literature (Revised)." 
Manly's "English Prose and Poetry." Required of all Sopho- 
mores. Professor Mclntire. Four hours for one semester. 

C. Old English. Smith's "Old English Grammar and 

Reader." 
Middle English, Chaucer: "The Prologue" and the 

" Knight 's Tale." 
Modern English. Krapp's "Modern English, Its Growth 

and Present Use." 
Professor Sellers. Three hours for the year. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 27 

D. Literary Criticism. Winchester's "Principles of Literary 
Criticism" is used as a text-book and Manly's " English Prose 
and Poetry/' as supplementary reading and application. Elec- 
tive to Juniors who have taken English B. Professor Mcln- 
tire. Two hours for the year. 

E. American Literature. Page's "The Chief American 
Poets" is used as a text-book, and is supplemented by Pan- 
coast's "Introduction to American Literature" and a private 
reading course. Elective to students who have taken English 
D. Professor Robinson. Two hours for the year. 

F. English Drama, consisting of lectures, readings, and 
reports. The. readings are largely in the works of Shakespeare 
and his contemporaries. Elective with the permission of the 
instructor to a limited number of Seniors who have taken 
English D. Professor Mclntire. Two hours for the year. 

G. Victorian Poets. Studies and readings in the poetry of 
Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. Cambridge Edition. Elec- 
tive for Seniors who have taken English D. Professor Mclntire. 
Two hours for the year. 

ETHICS 

(See Education and Philosophy) 

FRENCH 

(See Romance Languages.) 

GEOLOGY 
Professor Stephens 

A. Geology. An introduction to the science of Geology, 
both for students who are planning further scientific pursuits, 
and also for the larger class who wish merely to obtain an 
outline of the methods and principal results of the subject. 
Open to Seniors. Four hours, first semester. 



28 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Prettyman 

A. Beginners' Course. German Grammar. German Prose. 
Practice in writing German. The work in this course is con- 
ducted in German according to the Direct Method. Three 
hours for the year. 

B. A continuation of course A, and open only to students 
who have completed that course. The method is the same, the 
work being conducted in German. Three hours for the year. 

C. A continuation of B, and open only to students who 
have completed that course. Three hours for the year. 

D. German Prose and Poetry. Grammar and practice in 
writing German. Required of Freshmen who offer two 3^ears 
of German for admission to college. Four hours for the year. 

E. History of German Literature. German Prose Composi- 
tion. This course is a continuation of Course D and is intended 
for those who have completed that course. Three hours for the 
year. 

F. History of German Literature. Lectures. Reading of 
representative works. Advanced Prose Composition. This 
course is open to students who have completed D and E and 
may be elected a second year, as the works read are not the 
same in successive years. Three hours for the year. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Associate Professors Springer and Wing, and Mr. Kelly 

A. Beginners' Greek. Emphasis will be laid on the acquisi- 
tion of a vocabulary and of a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of Greek grammar. Dining the spring term the 
class will read selections from easy Greek prose. Four hours 
for the year. 

B. Freshman (,'rccl:. Pinto's Socratic Dialogues will form 

the subject, of the work of the first semester, other prose 

authors will be studied during the second semester. There 

will also be some work in Greek Composition. This course 
i- intended to lay the foundation for all further study of 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 29 

Greek. Students desiring to enter it are expected to have 
completed satisfactorily three years of Greek in preparatory 
school or to have passed satisfactorily in Greek G. Four hours 
for the year. 

C. Sophomore Greek. Thucydides, iEschylus, Sophocles, 
Aristophanes. These authors are studied as representative 
expressions of the changing spirit of the Greek people. This 
course is necessary to those who wish further to pursue the 
study of Greek. Three hours for the year. 

D. Advanced Greek. The work of this course changes from 
year to year. In 1917-18 it is planned to take up the study of 
Ancient Philosophy. A large part of the works of Plato and 
Aristotle will be read in translation. Portions of the Republic 
of Plato and certain other philosophical works will be read in 
the original. Three hours for the year. 

E. New Testament Greek, Gospels. In the junior and senior 
years New Testament Greek may be elected by those who have 
completed Greek courses A and G. During these two years 
it is possible to read a large part of the Greek New Testament. 
Textual criticism, sight reading, New Testament introduction, 
and contemporary philosophy and history are given special 
attention. This course is taken up only in even-numbered 
years, alternating with course F. Two hours for the year. 

F. New Testament Greek, Epistles, etc., Similar to course E, 
alternating with it. Given in odd-numbered years. Two hours 
for the year. 

G. Continuation of Greek A. Grammar, Composition. 
Reading of prose works and Homer. This course is planned to 
connect the work in beginning Greek with that of Courses B, 
E, and F, for which it is a prerequisite. Three hours for the year. 

H. Greek Civilization. This course is intended to give an 
introduction to the Greek ideals and character through the 
study of their life and of the products of their civilization. It 
is planned especially to meet the needs of those who have no 
knowledge of the Greek language, but may be taken by stu- 
dents who have not taken a course in Greek more advanced 
than Greek B. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, 
second semester. 



30 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

HISTORY 
Professor Prince and Associate Professor Wing 

A. Ancient. The chief developments of the history of the 
Ancient World are studied both for their intrinsic interest and 
value and for the light they throw on modern civilization. 
Less attention is given to the political and military history of 
the Greeks than to the economic, social, artistic, and intel- 
lectual phases of their civilization. The course aims to give 
some acquaintance with proper methods of historical study as 
well as with the facts of history. Required of Freshmen. Two 
hours for the year. 

B. American History. From 1750 to the close of Recon- 
struction. Required of Sophomores. Four hours for one 
semester. 

C. Civilization in Europe. A philosophic study of the his- 
tory of Western Europe from the Fall of the Roman Empire 
to the close of the French Revolution. Open to Seniors. 
Two hours for the year. 

D. 1 Spain and the Spanish- American Colonies. An analy- 
sis of the parallel processes of national expansion and decay 
from the accession of Charles I to the end of the reign of Charles 
III, supplemented by a survey of Spanish colonial development. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four hours, first semester. 

E. 1 Europe from the Congress of Vienna. The theme of 
this course is the struggle between monarchy and democracy 
as the central fact in the political history of Europe in the Nine- 
teenth Century. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four hours, 
first semester. 

F. International Law. The historical development of the 
comity of states and the nature and growth of the rules which 
govern their intercourse. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four 
hours, second semester. 

INTERNATIONAL LAW 
(See History.) 
1 i > .Hid B are siren [n alternating yeaj D ii given la r.»ic>-i7. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 31 

ITALIAN 

(See Romance Languages.) 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professor Filler and Mr. Kelly 

A. Freshman Latin. Selections from Sallust, Livy, Cicero. 
Latin Grammar is carefully reviewed and emphasis laid upon 

the mastery of the art of translation. Much time is given to 
translation in the class-room, and to the writing of Latin 
Prose. 

The course is largely devoted to drill-work, and aims to 
prepare the student for the intelligent and sympathetic reading 
of Latin literature in subsequent courses. Open to Freshmen. 
Four hours for the year. 

B. Sophomore Latin. An outline study of the History of 
Latin Literature with illustrative readings. 

In the first semester Classical Mythology is rapidly reviewed, 
with particular reference to its use in literature and art. 

In the second semester the Manners and Customs of the 
Romans are considered. Open to Sophomores. Three hours 
for the year. 

For those who have completed A and B one or two of the 
following courses will be given each year, according to the 
needs and desires of those electing advanced work. 

In courses C and D attention is given to the needs of those 
planning to teach. 

C. Vergil, Works, Life, and Literary Influence, with read- 
ings from the Eclogues and ^Eneid, VII-XII. Three hours, 
first semester. 

Horace, Satires and Epistles. Three hours, second semester. 

D. Cicero, Letters and Orations, with particular reference 
to his political career and the public life of the times. Three 
hours, first semester. 

Lyric Poetry, particularly the poems of Catullus. Three 
hours, second semester. 



32 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

E. Tacitus and the other prose writers of the Silver Age. 
History and description of the Roman Government. Three 
hours for the year. 

F. Selections from the Elegiac Writers of the Augustan 
Age and the chief poets of the Silver Age. More extended 
study of the History of Latin Literature. Three hours for the 
year. 

LAW 

Dean Trickett 

A. Criminal Law, first two terms; Bailments, the third 
term. Open to Juniors. Three hours per week. 

B. Real Property. Three hours for the year. 

C. Contracts. Two hours for the year. 

D. Courses B and C combined. Open to Seniors. Five hours 
for the year. 

E. Torts, first two terms; Domestic Relations, the third 
term. Three hours per week. 

MATHEMATICS 
Professor Landis and Adjunct Professor Craver 

A. Algebra, including Theory of Equations, Determinants, 
the Binomial Theorem, Choice, Logarithms, Interest and 
Annuities, etc. (Wentworth). Solid Geometry (Durell). Trigo- 
nometry (Crockett). Four hours for the year. 

B. Analytic Geometry. The conies and a discussion of the 
general equation of the second degree (Fine and Thompson). 
Calculus. Differentiation, integration, maxima and minima 
curve tracing, areas, lengths, volumes, centers of mass, etc. 
(Hulburt). Three hours for the year. 

C. Calculus. Partial derivatives, curve tracing, evolutes, 
envelopes. Taylor's Theorem, special methods of integration, 
etc. (Hulburt). Three hours, first semester. 

I). Differential Equations (Murray). Three hours, second 
semester. 

E. Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions. The quadric 
surfaces and their more important properties, tin* general 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 33 

equation of the second degree, surfaces in general, and curves 
in space (C. Smith). Three hours, first semester. 

F. Projective Geometry (Cremona). Three hours, second 
semester. 

G. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Computation of annui- 
ties, net premiums, loading, etc. (Moir.) Three hours, one 
semester. 

H. Spherical Astronomy. Problems in latitude, longitude, 
time, etc. (Chauvenet and the American Ephemeris.) Three 
hours, one semester. 

I. History and Teaching of Mathematics. A reading course 
in the works of Cantor, Ball, Cajori, Zeuthen, Klein, Smith, 
Young, Schultze, etc. Three hours, one semester. 

Courses in the Theory of Numbers, Theory of Functions, 
Calculus of Probabilities, and other subjects have been given, 
and will be given whenever it seems desirable. Courses A 
and B are given each year. Of the remaining courses two are 
given each year, so that every student may follow at least 
four of them, and the student who presents course A for entrance 
may pursue six of them. 

K. Astronomy. An Introduction to Astronomy (Moulton). 
Two hours for the year. 

PHILOSOPHY 

See Education and Philosophy 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 
Director Craver 

The course in physical training is planned as a two-year 
course. One hundred and twenty periods of work are required 
of all male students of the college during their first two years 
in college. 

During the early months of his connection with the college 
each student is subjected to a careful physical examination by 
the director. All physical defects are noted and corrective 
exercises suggested. 



34 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

The courses in physical training are as follows: 

I. Outdoor work — walking, running, jumping, etc., non- 
competitive. 

II. Outdoor work — competitive sports — football, base- 
ball, track, tennis. 

III. Indoor work, calisthenics. 

IV. Indoor work — competitive games — basket ball, track 
athletics, gymnasium team. 

PHYSICS 
Professor Mohler 

A. Mechanics, Sound, Light and Electricity. Demonstra- 
tion lectures or recitations. Text — Kimball's " College 
Physics." Three hours for the year. 

B. A laboratory course to accompany Physics A. Exact 
measurements in Mechanics, Sound, Light and Heat. Two 
hours (counting as one) for the year. 

C. Courses A and B combined. 

D. Electricity and Light. Demonstration lectures or reci- 
tations. Three hours for the year. 

E. A laboratory course on Light, Electricity, and Pho- 
tography. Two hours (counting as one) for the year. 

F. Courses D and E combined. 

G. An advanced course in electrical measurement. Text 
— Franklin, Crawford and McNutt. Two hours (counting as 
one) for the year. 

Advanced laboratory work in Optics and Heat. Text — 
Mann's "Advanced Optics." Courses as follows: 
H. Two hours (counting as one) for the year. 
I. Four hours (counting as two) for the year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

\S<< Education and Philosophy.) 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 35 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Associate Professor Robinson 

Public Reading. Drill in articulation, pronunciation, em- 
phasis, pitch, inflection, pause, management of the voice, ease 
of bearing, gesture, etc. 

Public Speaking. Extemporaneous public speaking from 
outlines prepared in advance. Declamations. 

Debating. Extemporaneous and prepared debates, the former 
with the use of outlines prepared in advance. One hour for the 
year. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor Cole 
FRENCH 

The instruction in this department aims mainly at such a 
knowledge of the language as will enable the student to read 
the prose and poetry of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and 
nineteenth centuries, without the necessity of translating, and 
with understanding and enjoyment. To this end the Direct 
Method is employed, so far as conditions make it practicable, 
and French is progressively the language of the class-room. 
Throughout the course persistent attention is given to pro- 
nunciation and sentence stress. There is a large amount of 
translation of easy sentences into French, and a still larger 
amount of question and answer in French on the texts read. 
Dictation exercises are frequent. Translation into English, 
at first in detail, aims primarily at making the meaning clear 
from the French point of view, and gradually gives place to 
question and answer in French, and to translation only of the 
difficulties and of new words and idioms. 

In course A the reading is largely nineteenth-century prose. 
Some account is given of the authors read and of their place 
in the history of the literature. The reading in course B is 
mainly from representative prose writers of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries; but a considerable number of French 



36 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

lyrics is also read. Course C deals mainly, in class, with the 
great writers of the seventeenth century; it is supplemented 
by the reading, outside of class, of a considerable amount from 
modern writers. Courses B and C are intended to give a 
somewhat connected general view of the history of the lit- 
erature during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth 
centuries. 

A. Beginners' Course. Pronunciation. French Grammar. 
Conversation. Dictation. Practice in translating into Eng- 
lish. Practice in writing French. This course is conducted 
partly in French. Three or four hours for the year. 

B. Continues course A. A considerable amount of out- 
side reading is required. The work is conducted mainly in 
French. Three hours for the year. 

C. Continues bourse B. A large amount of outside read- 
ing is required. The work is conducted in French. Three 
hours for the year. 

D. Is intended to give further practice in understanding 
spoken French, and in French conversation. The recitations 
are conducted in French. It is open to those who, in the 
judgment of the teacher, have had sufficient training in French 
to profit by the work. Three hours {counting as two) for the 
year. 

ITALIAN 

A. 1 A rapid reading course, designed to enable the student 
to read and enjoy, without translation, modern Italian prose. 
Open ordinarily only to those who have had two years of 
college German and French, or their equivalent. Three hours 
for the year. 

SPANISH 

Mr. Kelly 

A. Spanish Grammar, with careful drill in pronunciation, 
conversation, composition, and translation into English. In 
the Latter part of the year easy Spanish texts, including the 
modern novel and comedy, are read. Three hours for ike 
year. 

1 Italian A la given In alternate years. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 37 

B. Spanish Literature and Composition, with a review of 
Spanish grammar. Exercises in advanced composition. 
Study of Spanish drama and poetry. In the second semester 
commerical Spanish will be studied with readings in Spanish 
novels and other prose writings. Three hours for the year. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 
Professor Patterson 

The aim of the department is to afford a comprehension of 
the factors and processes by which the past has become the 
present in order to serve the student in finding the larger 
meaning of life in society and the means of advancing most 
surely to the largest human achievement. 

Phenomena of social life, economic, political, educational 
and religious, are observed in the evolution of institutions and 
in the rise and fall of nations, present conditions being kept 
constantly in view and American conditions being specifically 
analyzed so that the student may be qualified for intelligent, 
responsible citizenship in addition to receiving great cultural 
benefit from the investigations. 

The department affords a broad view of the field of knowl- 
edge, enabling the student to find a proper setting and per- 
spective for his other studies, and at the same time find his 
own relation to the life of the world. 

In the Sophomore year the evolution of social institutions, 
with emphasis upon the economic and political, is traced in 
such a way as to qualify the student for advanced study in 
social problems, principles and policies, and aid him in dis- 
cerning the significance of social movements and social 
service agencies, — a survey of fields of social service affording 
suggestions in vocational guidance. 

A prize of twenty-five dollars, the gift of the Dickinson Chapter 
of the Chi Omega Fraternity, is awarded to the young woman 
student who excels in Sophomore work in the department. 

In the Junior and Senior years opportunity is afforded for 
the pursuit of more intensive courses in three important fields 
of social science. These courses acquaint the student in B 



38 DICKINSON COLLEGE 

with an analysis and evaluation of the forces involved in the 
wealth getting and wealth using activities in society (Eco- 
nomics); in C with the balancing, coordinating and directing 
of the various social forces to secure social progress (Sociology) ; 
in D with the control and direction of these forces through 
means devised by politically organized units of society to social 
ends (Politics). 

Courses E, F, and G dealing with the more complex social 
problems and involving the principles of the different fields of 
social science are given according to the qualifications and 
desires of students for more advanced work. 

A. Elements of Social Science. An understanding of the 
nature of society is afforded in a study of the origin and develop- 
ment of (1) social institutions, such as speech, writing, the arts 
and sciences, marriage and the family, religions, etc.; (2) the 
maintaining institutions (Economic), viz. the tools and processes 
of production, economic stages, and the correlated develop- 
ment of economic concepts; (3) the protecting, controlling 
institutions (Political), political activities and coordinated 
organization. 

In the light of their historical development, essential to an 
understanding of great social movements and to an intelligent 
direction of social evolution, some simpler social problems are 
considered, and certain fields of social service are presented as 
opportunities for furthering social progress. Required of all 
Sophomores. Three hours for the year. 

B. Principles and Problems of Economics. In the first 
semester the theory of value is developed in relation to con- 
sumption and production and is applied to the problem of 
distribution including the theories of rent, interest, wages and 
profits. 

In the second semester, money, credit and banking and the 
fundamental principles of exchange are studied with reference 
to the requirements of a good system, the relation of the govern" 
incut to the system, and the involved relation to public finance. 
TJiree hours for the year. 

C. Sociology. The first semester is given to an examination 
of the bases of groupings, cooperations and conflicts among 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 39 

men, and of the grounds, means and system of social control 
issuing in social order. In the second semester social principles 
and policies are considered in relation to problems growing 
out of modern industrial organization and changes in the family, 
population, etc. A practical study of social functions and ten- 
dencies in adjustment to changing demands of society. Three 
hours for the year. 

D. Politics. A study of the State and government as the 
means by which society makes its will effective. Special atten- 
tion is given to the actual working of present d